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Author Topic: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong  (Read 27456 times)

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #108 on: Monday 12 March 18 11:30 GMT (UK) »
 EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD, died Oct 24th 1878 in Old Hong Kong, last sailed on thye Dharwar....sister ship to thye Cutty Sark

Tuckers Court Alley was at the most southern end of Dingle Lane and Dolphin Lane. Adjacent to
Tuckers court in proximity to the Poplar Workhouse was an open sewer running straight into the W.India dock. This 'open' sewer was a link to the 18th century and endured the name "Rolling Turd Alley" at least until the mid 1870's
From here it was just a short 5mins WALK to West India Docks and the famous ship building DUNBAR WHARF in Fore Street (now Narrow St, Limehouse and the infamous Ropemakers Fields) where Edward Henry and his dad (John the ropemaker) WORKED as a shipwright, probably until Duncan Dunbar died in 1862. It seems from here Edward moved to Cawdor Street closer to the East India Docks where he could embark on his many ship voyages.

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=46471

Dingle Lane and Dingle Lane School (demolished).

Dingle Lane, to the east of No. 30, was one of the ways from the High Street to the Isle of Dogs until the southern part was removed by the construction of the West India Docks. There was some building along it by the early eighteenth century, (ref. 357) and in the early nineteenth century Tucker's Court (begun by Thomas Hale) and Dingle Court were built on its south side.  They consisted of a double row of 14 back-to-back two-storey cottages, each with two rooms and a kitchen or scullery.


http://www.merchantnetworks.com.au/periods/1800after/1800dunbar.htm

Edward(Master shipwright) and his father John (Dunbar Wharf roperies) were very well paid in the employ of Duncan Dunbar. the ships tariff of 64 shares divided among crew were remnants of days of piracy. A ship's carpenter below 1st mate was the second best paid job on ships compliment.

The great ship builders of the 17th and 18th centuries came from Durham and Scotland. The Collingwoods of Durham were mostly seafarers, 'MASTER MARINERS' AND ship builders and came to London after the English Civil WAR...A line of Collingwoods held office as The High Sheriffs of Northumberland, more research is needed to find our connections here.
BUT one thing stands out...the early Collingwoods of the 15th to the 18th centuries, the Williams, the Johns and Edwards all seem to be wealthier than their later shipworking descendants.
They came to London and spread throughout the World and some made money from legal or illegal piracy/privateering.

There is  evidence that this 'bounty' the pirates share has been used to finance the apprenticeships of their descendants. How else did they make the money in those days for highly skilled training of shipwrights?  In some cases the financing of 'Victuallers Stores', Inns around the Wapping and Ratcliffe areas of Stepney. How did they form the 'closed' shop of the father to son in the Dock Trade and the Guilds of Shipwrights, Sawyers, Cordwainers and Ropemakers ? Admiral Nelson used Swedish ropemaking techniques to be used in the roperies of Limehouse. A contingency of Swedish crewmen volunteered at Trafalgar and were considered the best ropemen of the time. Our 'Collingwood' history of the sea is prolific down the centuries, it may take me further..good luck, Daniel Collingwood

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Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #109 on: Monday 12 March 18 12:26 GMT (UK) »
Some of our ancestors can be found in trials at the Old Bailey mostly as witnesses and the stories in the court transcripts are chilling in their authenticity and the language of times gone by..

https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t17480526-18-person216&div=t17480526-18#highlight

Margaret Collingwood- witness, great great grandmother of Edward Henry Collingwood.

Jury. We should be glad to know what Mrs. Collingwood's husband is  (does)?

Collingwood. My husband is master of a Guinea-man . (Slaver)

Jury. Where do you live?

Collingwood. In Queen's-Square, Ratcliff-Highway .

Jury. Why was it improper for him to come to your house?

Collingwood. I thought it improper.

Jury. For what reason.

Collingwood. Why then, Gentlemen of the Jury, I will tell you. My husband has been gone these six years, trading on the coast of Guinea; and he being gone so long I was forced to take a lodging, and take in plain work , and go out to ironing. As to my sister, she lives in a very creditable manner, I do assure you.

Guilty *


https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t18480515-name-918&div=t18480515-1350#highlight

EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD- witness I am in the employ of a shipwright I was employed in taking some copper off the ship Earl Grey, belonging to Mr. Duncan Dunbar—I threw the copper on the punt—I can swear to all this copper, except two pieces—it came off that ship—two of these pieces in particular I can swear to, and the other I have no doubt of—they were all in the punt, which was under the ship acting as a stage for me to work at the vessel—I know this piece by my own marking on it, and this one by its acting as a brace under the pump case.



http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/search.jsp?foo=bar&form=searchHomePage&_persNames_surname=collingwood&kwparse=and&start=0

Henry Baxter, John Rook.
Violent Theft: highway robbery. 5th December 1733  - Verdict Guilty
Sentence   Death

http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t17331205-12-person106&div=t17331205-12#highlight

George Collingwood -witness - Great Uncle to John the Ropemaker  Going over the Fields with Mr. Wilmot and his Clerk, two Fellows came running along, and crying out, Lord have Mercy upon us! - O Lord! - a mad Bull! - the Devil! - has frighted us out of our Wits. I thought they look'd like a Couple of Rogues, and the Prosecutor said, he believ'd they were the Men that robb'd him, and so we made bold to secure them both.



THE ORDINARY of NEWGATE'S ACCOUNT of the Behaviour, Confession, and Dying Words. Of the EIGHT MALEFACTORS, Who were executed at TYBURN, On MONDAY the 17th of March, 1755,


http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=OA17550317n23-2&div=OA17550317#highlight
At the Place of EXECUTION.

ON Monday morning, the 17th instant, about nine o'clock, the several malefactors ordered for execution, were brought out of the press-yard, and being put into three carts, Gill and Delarant , in one; Trevis , Haynes and Burton , in a second; Burk , Preston and Dyson , in a third, were carried to the place of execution, about ten o'clock. When they were tied up to the fatal tree, some time was passed in recommending their souls to divine mercy; and they were very intent to prayers, in the name of Christ and his church, offered up to the throne of grace in their behalf; and prayed as heartily in others, which they repeated for themselves, acknowledging their unworthiness, and dependance only on Christ's merits.

Dyson, at getting into the cart at Newgate, as also when he was in the cart from which he was executed at Tyburn, shewed such extraordinary marks of senselesness of his condition, as surprised every beholder. But where's the wonder, when we consider him as scarce past childhood; having never been exercised, but in puerile amusements; having had no education; and scarce ever having heard there was a God and a future state, till under sentence of death. Notwithstanding, as horrible a dread overwhelmed him, as did, perhaps, any of the rest, who behaved as became people in their last moments.

Only Burk died a Roman catholick ; who declared, as Gill did to the last, that the robbery, for which Isaiah Robbins, now under respite for three weeks, was convicted, was by them committed near Whitechapel- mount , upon Mr. Richardson. Execution was done upon them without any disturbance, tho' a vast multitude were gathered together on the occasion. Their bodies were delivered to their friends.

This is all the Account given by me, JOHN TAYLOR , Ordinary of Newgate.


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Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #110 on: Monday 12 March 18 13:11 GMT (UK) »
You can trace back all the Collingwoods that appeared at the Old Bailey.
Click the forward button to access each page.



Hannah Brown, Esther Collingwood -
Theft: grand larceny.
6th December 1693

http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/search.jsp?foo=bar&form=searchHomePage&_persNames_surname=collingwood&kwparse=and&start=0

Esther Collingwood - believed to be great aunt of Margaret Collingwood and was a regular at the Old Bailey.


Hannah Brown, alias Batson , and Esther Collingwood , were both Tried for stealing a Gown, val. 20 shillings. six Napkins val. 6 shillings. a Table-Cloth 6 shillings. the Goods of John Racey ; and a Gown and other Goods from Mrs. Ann Smith ; Brown was Mr. Racey's Servant ; and whilst he and his Wife were abroad, she robbed the House, which she confessed when taken: and a Mantua and Petticoat was found upon Collingwood; but it did not appear that Collingwood had any hand in the Felony, so she was Acquitted , but Brown was found guilty .
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Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #111 on: Monday 30 April 18 10:44 BST (UK) »
the crew list of the DHARWAR -1878.

http://marinersandships.com.au/1878/05/032dha.htm

She left London for Sydney 14th May 1878. It is not certain if the DHARWAR participated in the tea trade to Hong Kong and Shanghai. BUT she pulled into Hong Kong to bury my dear old great-great-grand-dad-Edward Henry.Around 1875-77 tea clippers turned to the 'wool fleets' and carried both cargoes to fill up their holds. The Dharwar was one of the 'Iron Clads' fully rigged for sail and engines she was quite fast. She was luxuriously decked out and Edward Henry is fourth rated among the ships crew as carpenter/shipwright, and very well paid.

http://www.bruzelius.info/Nautica/Ships/Merchant/Sail/D/Dharwar(1864).html

Built in 1864, she was fulled rigged, iron body sail/engine. Constructed for the Australian emmigrant and wool trade. Provisions were also made for the transportation of convicts.

nb..Edward's age on the crew list is given as 58 but this may be Edward telling porkies as he was 61 in 1878...and the oldest crew member by 16yrs. I don't think he wanted to retire back home in dreary Poplar. Australia was the 'new' New Adventure but maybe he was getting to the age where his life became an indecision. Australia and the gold rush was underway...Edward was losing his sea legs?  His eldest son Robert Edward had travelled with him on an early trip in 1859 on the Camperdown...it is thought Robert  stayed in Australia - disembarked. After 1859 all records of him are lost

1878 This was the fateful trip where EH lost his life after doing 'at sea' repairs to steering and sails damage during a storm....he contracted pneumonia and was taken to Old Hong Kong...where he died in hospital.

http://marinersandships.com.au/shipdate.htm

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Mrs Wiseman's Bequest
« Reply #112 on: Tuesday 29 May 18 22:28 BST (UK) »
Mrs Mary Wiseman's Bequest left £1,000 in her will Jan 1758 to train six young boys as shipwrights at Woolwich Yard. The one condition was that they had to be sons of deceased shipwrights of the Woolwich Yard.

https://goo.gl/DV4UGU

The accademy that she created proved successful and the boys were under the watchful eye of the Master Attendant...Edward Collingwood grand father of Francis Edward Collingwood of Trafalgar initiated and encouraged the training of boys to become sawyers and shipwrights.

https://goo.gl/DV4UGU
 
 John the ropemaker died when Edward Henry was 4yrs old in 1821. He most likely  used his father's and grandfather's 'tickets' and went on to become a 'freelance' shipwright working for Duncan Dunbar until 1862 and then moving on to working for Green and Wigram until his demise in Old Hong Kong, 1878. I will be making further checks to see if EH had been apprenticed under the auspices of Mrs Wiseman's Bequest!


I hope to establish a family connection through Edward the Sawyer (nephew?) and Edward the Master Attendant(uncle-in-law?) through Francis of Trafalgar and the Lord Admiral Cuthbert Collingwood and Sir Daniel Collingwood of Brandon.

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #113 on: Friday 15 February 19 21:33 GMT (UK) »

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #114 on: Friday 15 February 19 21:49 GMT (UK) »
I have corrected the transcribed mistakes from the archive document of 1823. The wording is in the tense as written originally. Francis Edward Collingwood with mid-shipman John Pollard were both finally credited with killing the French sniper who killed Admiral Lord Nelson, from the mizzen mast of Le Redoutable. The dispute as to who killed the sniper had raged for 40 years, 30 years after Collingwood died

https://archive.org/stream/cihm_37593/cihm_37593_djvu.txt
page 258

*The Victory, 1744, here, is of course an earlier ship of the same name and not Nelson's flag-ship of which Francis Edward Joined at Spithead one month before Trafalgar......

FRANCIS EDWARD COLLINGWOOD, Esq.

Is descended from a very ancient family, the CoUingwoods,
of Eslington, co. Northumberland, led by their attachment to the House of Stuart, suffered a great reverse of fortune, in 1715. His grandfather, Edward, successively  master- attendant of the dock-yards at Plymouth, Portsmouth, Chatham, and Deptford, (the first person of the name  of Collingwood whom we find mentioned in our naval annals),  sailed round the world, as midshipman, with Anson, by whom  he was ever afterwards patronised, and was master of the  *Victory, first rate, flag- ship of Admiral Sir John Balchen, a  short time previous to her loss, in Oct. 1744 *.

 On the 3d Oct, 1744, the fleet under Sir John Balchen, then returning home from Gibraltar, encountered a violent storm, in which several  of the ships were much shattered. On the 4th, the "Victory separated  from her consorts, and was never more heard of. It is supposed that she  struck upon a ridge of rocks off the Caskets ; as from the testimony of  the men who attended the lights, and the inhabitants of the island of (GIBRALTA)
 
Mr. F. E, CoLLiNGWooD, only son of Francis Collngwood,  of Greenwich, Esq., by Sarah, sister to the hite Captain  Thomas Richbell, K. N., chief magistrate of the Thames  Police, was born at Milford, co. Pembroke 1785 and entered the royal navy, as midshipman on board the  America  commanded by his **uncle-in-law, the late Vice-Admiral Sir William Parker,  and subsequently served in the Pheasant sloop, Beaulieu and Alligator  frigates. Elephant and Victory of 100 guns, the latter  ship bearing the flag of the immortal Nelson, whose death he  avenged by shooting the French rifleman who had, after repeated attempts, succeeded in mortally wounding that illustrious hero at the ever memorable battle of Trafalgar. During  that tremendous conflict, he was sent from his quarters on  the poop, where the carnage was most dreadful, with a few  men, to assist in extinguishing a fire on board the French 74-  gun ship, le Redoubtable, which service he performed in a  manner highly satisfactory to his captain, the present Sir  Thomas M. Hardy. His promotion to the rank of lieutenant  took place on the 22d Jan. 1806.

After serving for some time in the Queen, flag-ship of  Lord Collingwood, and Bahama 74, one of the Spanish ships  captured off Trafalgar, this officer was appointed to the. Pallas  in which frigate we find him present, under the command of Captain (now Sir George F.)Seymour, at the destruction of five French men-of-war, in Aix Roads, April 12th, 1809  In the ensuing summer, he accompanied the  grand expedition sent against Antwerp, and was constantly  employed, in guard boats and on shore, during the occupation  of Walcheren. His next appointment was, Dec. 13th, 1809,  to be first lieutenant of the Iris 30, in M'hich ship he continued for a period of five years.

Alderney, many guns were heard on the nights of the 4th and 5th, but  the weather was too tempestuous to hazard boats out to their assistance. In this ship perished near one thousand men, besides fifty volunteers,  sons of the first nobility and gentry in the kingdom.
The Iris was principally employed in co-operation with the  patriots on the north coast of Spain, where Lieutenant Collingwood appears to have been a constant volunteer for boat  and shore service; and on many occasions obtained the particular approbation of Captain Sir George Collier, senior  officer of the squadron on that station.

 In  Nov. 1814, Mr. Coliingwood was appointed first lieutenant of the Niger, Captain Peter Rainier, under whom he served  for a short time on the Cape of Good Hope station. In December 1820, he obtained the command of the Kite revenue cruiser,  employed on the coast of Ireland, where he continued for the  usual period of three years.

During this time he had two  ribs and his breast bone fractured, was wounded by a pike
through the leg, and received two severe contusions on the  head, hie was also washed overboard in a heavy gale of  wind, and must have perished, all his boats having been previously lost, had not a following sea thrown him on the  square-sail brace, to which he clung until assisted in-board.

His promotion to the rank of commander took place January 15th, 1828.

This officer married, in May 1822, Ellen second daughter of the late Rev. Samuel Collis, of Fort William, co. Kerry, ly whom he has several children. His only surviving sister  was wife the of Dr. J. D. Burke, late surgeon of H. M. dockyard at Pembroke, and is now the widow of the Rev. Hugh
Taylor.

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #115 on: Friday 15 February 19 21:57 GMT (UK) »
previous post,

 read original 1823 text scroll down to.....
 Collingwood, Francis Edward 258

page 258
 https://archive.org/stream/cihm_37593/cihm_37593_djvu.txt