Author Topic: 1812 Free Settler going to join Convict Spouse - Pay for travel? or sent free?  (Read 701 times)

Offline PK-KTK

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In 1812/1813, would a Free Settler travelling from the UK to Australia to join a life sentenced convict spouse sent previously, would they have paid for their travel, or would they have been sent "complements" of the government?
If the settler paid, how much would they have paid? and would they have had to pay that all up front, or would they have been able to pay it off over time after arrival in the colony?

Thanks
Surnames: Argent, Baldock, Barnes, Bowles, Carter, Clemons (+var), Crisp, Dawson, Devereaux, Ferrier (+var), Fox, Glascock, Glew, Hardman, Hins ?, Holden, Holes, Holiday, Leach, Leiper, Mabley, Macdonald / Mcdonald, Marshall, Naylor, Paine, Reid, Sandford / Sanford, Siddle (+var) / Liddell, Stagg, Tongue, Vickers, Warner, Webb, Whitehead, Wilcox, Wood.
Locations: England to 1940's, Eastern Australia from 1820's, New Zealand 1870-1910, Scotland to 1880's

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Offline jorose

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Re: 1812 Free Settler going to join Convict Spouse - Pay for travel? or sent free?
« Reply #1 on: Thursday 04 July 13 14:01 BST (UK) »
Spouse and family could be sent out (usually once the convict had ticket of leave and could support them), see:
http://www.records.nsw.gov.au/state-archives/guides-and-finding-aids/archives-in-brief/archives-in-brief-34

Try looking at the Index to Colonial Secretary's Correspondence 1788-1825  (linked from the above page), which has a lot of references.
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Offline PK-KTK

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Thanks jorose

Not sure there is enough time between his arrival in Oct 1813 and her arrival in Jan 1814 for all of the necessary bits to happen though.
She'd almost be leaving England as he's arriving in Australia since it took him 4 months to get here, and it would take her a similar amount of time.
Surnames: Argent, Baldock, Barnes, Bowles, Carter, Clemons (+var), Crisp, Dawson, Devereaux, Ferrier (+var), Fox, Glascock, Glew, Hardman, Hins ?, Holden, Holes, Holiday, Leach, Leiper, Mabley, Macdonald / Mcdonald, Marshall, Naylor, Paine, Reid, Sandford / Sanford, Siddle (+var) / Liddell, Stagg, Tongue, Vickers, Warner, Webb, Whitehead, Wilcox, Wood.
Locations: England to 1940's, Eastern Australia from 1820's, New Zealand 1870-1910, Scotland to 1880's

Offline majm

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In 1812/1813, would a Free Settler travelling from the UK to Australia to join a life sentenced convict spouse sent previously, would they have paid for their travel, or would they have been sent "complements" of the government?
If the settler paid, how much would they have paid? and would they have had to pay that all up front, or would they have been able to pay it off over time after arrival in the colony?

Thanks

May I ask for some details about this prospective free settler.   For example:
Her name as found on the arrival in Jan 1814 ....  What ship?  What port of arrival? 

The Governor at the time was Lachlan Macquarie, and it was during his administration that we find the 'bureaucrats' setting up administrative systems.  Many of the original records from that era are available at the NSW SRO.   There are RChatters who are usually on the Aussie Board who are known to volunteer to go along to the Kingswood Archives office of NSW SRO and look items up for other RChatters. 

On the other hand, there's also Ancestry which NSW SRO has a current partnership with and the Col Sec's papers 1788-1825 are currently available there.  So if you have access to a public library you may find they have access to the images too, via Ancestry.

Yes, depending on the Trade Winds, depended on how many ports the ship needed to call into and collect any supplies etc for the voyage.  So four months is a fair estimate for any voyage arriving Jan 1814 from any UK port. 

Of course, you need also to consider

a) when was the person convicted .... therefore how much time had the free settler had to make the arrangements and

b) if the free settler had sufficient means to 'want' to come and thus be the support for the convict 

(Afterall in 1814 the convict did NOT have any barracks to house himself, and thus was likely to be assigned to someone already residing in the colony.  That person could well be a former convict, or a merchant, or a town resident.  But in 1814 it is not likely the convict was sent west over the Blue Mountains (explored and passage found over these in May 1813). 

c) If the convict was NOT in Sydney Town, then where was he assigned, perhaps to Newcastle or further north or perhaps to VDL ....

So to answer your question ..... Gov Macquarie did have authority to approve requests for spouse to join a convict, but usually only gave such permission after he had determined the convict was of good character usually evidenced by issue of a ToL.....  and then the fare would be covered by the English Admin and the spouse found passage usually with a garrison force despatch.    If on the other hand the free settler wanted to come anyway and thus without permission of the Governor, then the passage would need to be organised and funded by the settler.  Of course, strictly speaking the settler needed permission to enter a penal colony and settle there.  That could be sought from the Governor of NSW or it could be sought by the applicant (the settler) applying to the Secretary of State for the Colonies in England, (Whitehall ?) 
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secretary_of_State_for_the_Colonies


Cheers,  JM 
 

 
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Offline PK-KTK

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Re: 1812 Free Settler going to join Convict Spouse - Pay for travel? or sent free?
« Reply #4 on: Saturday 06 July 13 02:58 BST (UK) »
hi majm

I've actually found a newspaper clipping this morning telling me that the spouse would have left England on the same day as the convict, but due to travelling via a different route, has take 3 months longer to arrive.

the Convict is John Wood alias Leach, arrived on Earl Spencer in Oct 1813
the spouse is Elizabeth Leach, arrived on Kangaroo in Jan 1814
both arrivals in Port Jackson / Sydney in New South Wales.

I'm actually still trying to track down a passenger list for the Kangaroo, but the musters of the colony give her as arriving on that vessel at that time.

There was approx 6 months between John Wood alias Leach's conviction and his departure, so probably plenty of time to sort out her travel as well.

Still, the question remains, did she pay for it herself, and if so, how much would it have cost her, was she allowed to pay it off over time before or after arrival, or was she sent out at crown expense due to her married status and the life sentence given to her husband? (or did she just stow away  ;) )
Surnames: Argent, Baldock, Barnes, Bowles, Carter, Clemons (+var), Crisp, Dawson, Devereaux, Ferrier (+var), Fox, Glascock, Glew, Hardman, Hins ?, Holden, Holes, Holiday, Leach, Leiper, Mabley, Macdonald / Mcdonald, Marshall, Naylor, Paine, Reid, Sandford / Sanford, Siddle (+var) / Liddell, Stagg, Tongue, Vickers, Warner, Webb, Whitehead, Wilcox, Wood.
Locations: England to 1940's, Eastern Australia from 1820's, New Zealand 1870-1910, Scotland to 1880's