Author Topic: Farmer to teacher?  (Read 420 times)

Offline Evertonian2

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Farmer to teacher?
« on: Thursday 03 April 14 16:00 BST (UK) »
I am mystified by the fact that my gggrandfather, George Sedgwick was a farmer at Gaythorn Hall near Asby, Westmorland from 1815 to 1825 (baptism of his children confirm this), was a farm labourer on the 1841 census (at Brunthwaite near Kendal, Westmorland) but in 1851 was newly widowed and staying with his daughter Ann Nelson at Lupton, Westmorland and is described as a schoolmaster.  He is also described as schoolmaster in Mannex's directory in 1851, living at Burneside, Kendal, Westmorland.  How possible is it that this is the same person, or have I made a mistake?  What qualifications were needed to be a schoolmaster in 1851?  Can anyone help?


Offline conahy calling

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Re: Farmer to teacher?
« Reply #1 on: Thursday 03 April 14 16:31 BST (UK) »
http://www.ioe.ac.uk/services/documents/SG8_family_history_(March_2009).pdf

This link may help, see end of first page and following on. :)

Offline Evertonian2

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Re: Farmer to teacher?
« Reply #2 on: Thursday 03 April 14 16:56 BST (UK) »
Many thanks for your help - maybe this link will give me a lead.  I am most grateful to you.
Thanks again

Offline Ruskie

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Re: Farmer to teacher?
« Reply #3 on: Friday 04 April 14 01:23 BST (UK) »
I think I am correct in thinking that would be teachers served a kind of apprenticeship - learning on the job so to speak. They were called pupil teachers and were often just out of school themselves.

A move from farmer to teacher does seem to be unusual especially if he did so later in life. It could have been that when George was widowed and left the farm to live with his daughter, he took on a role in a classroom and 'big noted' himself on the census calling himself a schoolmaster. There were a lot of privately owned schools, some would have been little more than classes taken in someone's front room.

You may be looking at two different George Sedgwicks (I will check later when I have more time) so worth going back over what you've found. What was the occupation of his daughter Ann's husband? Was it related to teaching?


Offline Evertonian2

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Re: Farmer to teacher?
« Reply #4 on: Friday 04 April 14 16:40 BST (UK) »
Thanks for your helpful comments.  Ann's husband was, first, a tailor and then took over his father's farm (Fell End farm, Lupton), so no connection there.  George's wife died only in 1851, just before the census.  I have no details between 1841 ('farm labourer') and 1851 (Mannex and census - where he is described as 'schoolmaster').  This presupposes that he is the same George, but I think he is.  His age on the 1841 census (and that of his wife) is 50, when it should be 60 (born in 1781) but their son Thomas (born in 1820) is with them, so this supports the idea that he is the right George.  Incidentally, I have never found his marriage to Jane - the only possibility I have found is an 1810 marriage at St Bride's Fleet street, London.  Many thanks again.