Author Topic: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts  (Read 47560 times)

Offline spike59

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #27 on: Tuesday 13 January 15 16:52 GMT (UK) »
in Deptford and I'm not saying Deptford is better than anywhere else we had slang for money
ounce,duece,tray,rouf,jacks,cockle,score,pony,bullseye,longun,monkey,grand,

Offline Treetotal

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #28 on: Tuesday 13 January 15 17:14 GMT (UK) »
We called a pound note a "Greenback" and a Theepenny Bit a "Threpenny Dodger" a shilling was a "Bob" and sixpence was a "Tanner" ..Two shillings was a  "Florin"
Carol
CAPES Hull. KIRK  Leeds, Hull. JONES  Wales,  Lancashire. CARROLL Ireland, Lancashire, U.S.A. BROUGHTON Leicester, Goole, Hull BORRILL  Lincolnshire, Durham, Hull. GROOM  Wishbech, Hull. ANTHONY St. John's Nfld. BUCKNALL Lincolnshire, Hull. BUTT Harbour Grace, Newfoundland. PARSONS  Western Bay, Newfoundland. MONAGHAN  Ireland, U.S.A. PERRY Cheshire, Liverpool.
 
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Offline Sinann

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #29 on: Tuesday 13 January 15 17:27 GMT (UK) »
We called a pound note a "Greenback" and a Theepenny Bit a "Threpenny Dodger" a shilling was a "Bob" and sixpence was a "Tanner" ..Two shillings was a  "Florin"
Carol
Florin is English spelling for the Irish word for Two shillings.
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florin_(Irish_coin)


Offline Treetotal

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #30 on: Tuesday 13 January 15 17:30 GMT (UK) »
Thanks for that Sinann...I never knew...you learn something every day  ;D
Carol
CAPES Hull. KIRK  Leeds, Hull. JONES  Wales,  Lancashire. CARROLL Ireland, Lancashire, U.S.A. BROUGHTON Leicester, Goole, Hull BORRILL  Lincolnshire, Durham, Hull. GROOM  Wishbech, Hull. ANTHONY St. John's Nfld. BUCKNALL Lincolnshire, Hull. BUTT Harbour Grace, Newfoundland. PARSONS  Western Bay, Newfoundland. MONAGHAN  Ireland, U.S.A. PERRY Cheshire, Liverpool.
 
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Offline ThrelfallYorky

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #31 on: Tuesday 13 January 15 17:31 GMT (UK) »
The old yellow metal three penny coin was a "thruppenny bit" or a "thruppenny Joey" ? No idea why. "Half crown was self-evident, being half of 5 shillings (A crown). "Wrenny" for a farthing, "Bob" of course for shilling, "Quid" of course for 1, but I don't really recall many more as proper names usually used.
By the way, recently I heard on television a complete mangling of an amount originally stated in guineas (1, + 1 shilling) that came out as some ridiculous figure.
"OOp north" we never needed names for amounts above 5!
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Offline KGarrad

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #32 on: Tuesday 13 January 15 17:36 GMT (UK) »
We called a pound note a "Greenback" and a Theepenny Bit a "Threpenny Dodger" a shilling was a "Bob" and sixpence was a "Tanner" ..Two shillings was a  "Florin"
Carol
Florin is English spelling for the Irish word for Two shillings.
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florin_(Irish_coin)

Florin originates in the city of Florence and originally referred to a gold coin there (fiorino d'oro, 1252).

The name was then used in other countries - like a Dutch florin - and became the dominant currency in Europe.
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Offline Sinann

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #33 on: Tuesday 13 January 15 17:37 GMT (UK) »
Thanks for that Sinann...I never knew...you learn something every day  ;D
Carol

Thinking about it now I could be wrong,  it might be latin or old English word.

Offline Sinann

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #34 on: Tuesday 13 January 15 17:40 GMT (UK) »
Thanks KGarrad.
It was the memory of it written on the coin that threw me for a while there.

Offline KGarrad

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #35 on: Tuesday 13 January 15 17:43 GMT (UK) »
It's what comes of living in the Netherlands for 16 years, and drinking at The Florin & Firkin!! ;D ;D
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