Author Topic: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts  (Read 47581 times)

Offline Billyblue

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #9 on: Tuesday 13 January 15 00:18 GMT (UK) »
To spend a penny
A 30 year old of my acquaintance was astonished to learn just a few days ago that once upon a time you had to pay to use a public loo, and that was where this phrase came from
 ::)  ::)  ::)  ::)

Dawn M
Denys (France); Rossier/Rousseau (Switzerland); Montgomery (Antrim, IRL & North Sydney NSW); Finn (Co.Carlow, IRL & NSW); Wilson (Leicestershire & NSW); Blue (Sydney NSW); Fisher & Barrago & Harrington(all Tipperary, IRL)

Offline Nettie

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #10 on: Tuesday 13 January 15 07:41 GMT (UK) »
I remember having to use coins to enter the Flinders St Station toilets as a young child but never since in Australia. It still seems fairly common across Europe...at least in places we stopped on tour.
Researching: Cronin / Nolan - Gortadrislig, Kerry
Finn/Clifford - Callinafercy and Scort, Kerry
Spillane - Milltown
Also:- Byrne / Tyrrell - Dublin

Offline Nanna52

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #11 on: Tuesday 13 January 15 07:49 GMT (UK) »
Quote
Keynsham rose to fame during the late 1950s and early 1960s when it featured in a long-running series of advertisements on Radio Luxembourg for Horace Batchelor's Infra-draw betting system.[12] To obtain the system, listeners had to write to Batchelor's Keynsham post office box, and Keynsham was always painstakingly spelled out on-air, with Batchelor famously intoning "Keynsham spelt K-E-Y-N-S-H-A-M Keynsham, Bristol". This was done because the proper pronunciation of Keynsham "Cane-sham" does not make the spelling of Keynsham immediately obvious to the radio listener

Oh now I know how to pronounce the town my great grandparents came from.  I had been pronouncing it how it looked.  Key-n-sham.  Learn something new every day.
I can remember spending a penny at Flinders Street Station too Nettie.  Some of the shops were the same.
James -Victoria, Australia originally from Keynsham, Somerset.
Janes - Keynsham and Bristol area.
Heale/Hale - Keynsham, Somerset
Vincent - Illogan/Redruth, Cornwall.  Moved to Sculcoates, Yorkshire; Grass Valley, California; Timaru, New Zealand and Victoria, Australia.
Williams somewhere in Wales - he kept moving
Ellis - Anglesey

Gedmatch A327531


Offline jim1

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #12 on: Tuesday 13 January 15 12:12 GMT (UK) »
Just as well old Horace didn't come from Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwyll-llantysiliogogogoch.

In my neck of the woods the saying " I'll go to the top of our stairs" was in common use but no idea why.
Today catch phrases seem to have taken over from sayings but don't seem to have the longevity.
Can you hear me mother.
TTFN.
Get out of that, you can't can ya.
Shut that door.
Allo, allo.
My own made up one is "if you can't hide it make a feature of it" which with a bit of imagination can be applied to almost any dilemma which makes me feel better about whatever misfortune I've visited on the family.
Warks:Ashford;Cadby;Clarke;Clifford;Cooke Copage;Easthope;
Edmonds;Felton;Colledge;Lutwyche;Mander(s);May;Poole;Withers.
Staffs.Edmonds;Addison;Duffield;Webb;Fisher;Archer
Salop:Easthope,Eddowes,Hoorde,Oteley,Vernon,Talbot,De Neville.
Notts.Clarke;Redfearne;Treece.
Som.May;Perriman;Cox
India Kane;Felton;Cadby
London.Haysom.
Lancs.Gay.
Worcs.Coley;Mander;Sawyer.
Kings of Wessex & Scotland
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Offline Peterjay

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #13 on: Tuesday 13 January 15 12:31 GMT (UK) »
I think it is a shame that no nicknames have been given to the decimal coinage, just that one the tiddler which is now gone, the decimal coins are rubbish anyhow no character design like the L S D.
See how many nicknames you can list on here for the good old s d, we have a Tanner to start.
Clover, Matthews, Bradley. Franklin, Dredger, West Ham London area. Clover's in Suffolk.
Tydeman West Ham

Offline Flattybasher9

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #14 on: Tuesday 13 January 15 12:55 GMT (UK) »
The best one of all

"It's yerself, is it?"

Regards

Malky

Offline granger

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #15 on: Tuesday 13 January 15 13:44 GMT (UK) »
I didn't know my old sayings where taken in by my American born grandchildren until one of them turned to her mother after seeing a waitress drop a tray and said "Trouble at Mill" .

Offline Finley 1

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #16 on: Tuesday 13 January 15 13:51 GMT (UK) »
I love all the old sayings:  well I am off an age -- and I do remember spelling K E Y N S H A M  over and over.

 I do miss my Uncles 'give us a buzzer' phrase...

But sitting here just now - have forgotten most of them.

remind me please, what is the one about the door - being left open -  and jam jar... oh my..
remind me of as many as you can please :) :)

ps - where on earth do I get 'dolallytap' from?


xin

Offline Flattybasher9

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #17 on: Tuesday 13 January 15 13:53 GMT (UK) »
When is a door not a door? when it's ajar!!

Regards

Malky