Author Topic: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts  (Read 43059 times)

Offline Nettie

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #63 on: Thursday 22 January 15 21:58 GMT (UK) »
A word rather than a saying...grand.

My mother has been in Australia since 1967 and over my lifetime I have rarely heard her using the word grand in conversation. However, five minutes on the phone to her sister who still lives in Dublin and everyone and everything is grand.
Researching: Cronin / Nolan - Gortadrislig, Kerry
Finn/Clifford - Callinafercy and Scort, Kerry
Spillane - Milltown
Also:- Byrne / Tyrrell - Dublin

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Offline Roobarb

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #64 on: Thursday 22 January 15 22:21 GMT (UK) »
My mother's alternative to that was 'champion'.  :)
Bell, Salter, Street - Devon, Middlesbrough.
Lickess- North Yorkshire, Middlesbrough.
Etherington - North Yorks and Durham.
Barker- North Yorks
Crooks- Durham
Forster- North Yorks/Durham
Newsam, Pattison, Proud - North Yorks.
Timothy, Griffiths, Jones - South Wales

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Offline bykerlads

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #65 on: Friday 23 January 15 08:16 GMT (UK) »
Grand and champion were words regularly used when I was a child, especially by my dear old grandad.
I can picture him now - a lovely chap with such  a positive view on everything.

Offline andrewalston

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #66 on: Friday 23 January 15 22:19 GMT (UK) »
I adopted "grand" a few years back and now use it automatically where I used to use things like "OK".

I was very pleased when "A Grand Day Out" introduced Wallace and Gromit to the world.
Looking at ALSTON in south Ribble area, ALSTEAD and DONBAVAND/DUNBABIN etc. everywhere, HOWCROFT and MARSH in Bolton and Westhoughton, PICKERING in the Whitehaven area.

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Offline Treetotal

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #67 on: Friday 23 January 15 22:48 GMT (UK) »
Everything was "Smashing" when I was growing up.
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Offline molar

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #68 on: Saturday 24 January 15 07:30 GMT (UK) »
When I complained to grandma about her de-tangling my hair or tying tight rags for ringlets she would always reply "pride must abide, and we being quality must bear it!!"
I haven't ever heard of this outside our family so haven't any idea where it came from .
Allison:Atkinson:Cooper:Forster:Greenway:Grieves:Hickman(also Staffs):Mason:Reed:Tennent:Waggott: Nothumberland/Durham.
Armitage:Balam:Bowden:Dean:Etchells: Farney: Stockport /Manchester
Pollitt: Failsworth.
McVeety: Melia: Ireland/Manchester.
Wathen: Bristol
Voigt: Germany/Bristol/Manchester.
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Offline ruth52

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #69 on: Saturday 24 January 15 14:22 GMT (UK) »
A phrase I've used for years - came from my mum- "Its as broad as its long", meaning obviously there is no difference!
Does anyone else remember being told to " get hold of my danny" when you were little - meaning get hold of my hand?
whyatt/wyatt - chesterfield,de rusett/quigley,crosbie -india, barber, beswick- yorkshire, astridge- portsmouth,
travis, gill, barker, fielding- derbyshire

Offline LizzieL

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #70 on: Saturday 24 January 15 16:35 GMT (UK) »

But one  I have never sussed is my Gran's 'ditto brother chip' to someone having a go at her


My Gran used to say "ditto brother smut" to someone who was like a pot calling a kettle black. She came from Yorkshire and had quite a lot of unusual phrases.
Berks / Oxon: Eltham, Annetts, Wiltshire (surname not county), Hawkins, Pembroke, Partridge
Dorset / Hants: Derham, Stride, Purkiss, Scott, Sibley
Yorkshire: Pottage, Carr, Blackburn, Depledge
Sussex: Goodyer, Christopher, Trevatt
Jersey: Fowler, Huelin, Scott
Essex/Herts: Livermore, Holgate, Law, Day, Myson, Boyton
Norfolk/Suffolk: Stone, Alexander, Tipple, Ingate

Offline KGarrad

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Re: Old Sayings and Modern Counterparts
« Reply #71 on: Saturday 24 January 15 16:39 GMT (UK) »
One that sprung to mind, seeing as how I'm feeling today!

I feel like Death warmed up. ;D ;D
Garrad (Suffolk, Essex, Somerset), Crocker (Somerset), Vanstone (Devon, Jersey), Sims (Wiltshire), Bridger (Kent)