Author Topic: Irish traveller surnames  (Read 45150 times)

Offline Steve G

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Re: Irish traveller surnames
« Reply #45 on: Friday 25 January 19 21:22 GMT (UK) »
Oh, and, sorry: " is that when they became travelers? "

No. The dates Bob gives are just when he found an official record (Census or what ever) of a person declaring themselves Gypsys (or, perhaps, being found living in a tent or wagon) and proffering the given name.
GAITES (Alverstoke / Bath Pre 1850)
CURTIS (Portsmouth & 1800's Berkshire).
BURGE (Dorset, Somerset and Hampshire)
HUNTLEY (Dorset, Hampshire, Sussex, 'Surroundings')

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Offline Puffin81

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Re: Irish traveller surnames
« Reply #46 on: Friday 25 January 19 21:38 GMT (UK) »
A Pav (Pavee) is an Irish Gypsy.

How does one 'become' a Gypsy / Traveler? Depends on ones personal definition. Could vary from being directly descended from people who came out of India, a very long time ago.

Or, one could ~ last I knew ~ for example; Claim 'Gypsyship Under Statute'. There being a UK statute which defines what a Gypsy is. Basically, one who lives a normally nomadic existence and earns their living that way.

Can of worms there .....  :-X

Well they donít tell you all that on my big fat gypsy wedding!

So to become an Irish gypsy you had to lose your home and job & be nomadic, live by own means and camp? 

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Offline Steve G

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Re: Irish traveller surnames
« Reply #47 on: Friday 25 January 19 21:57 GMT (UK) »
So to become an Irish gypsy you had to lose your home and job & be nomadic, live by own means and camp?

I've never watched that (Said to be) appalling programme. I did hear it said, though, that it pretty much Only featured Pav's.

I must say; Your idea of how one would become a Pav actually sounds just about spot on!  :D I mean; I actually have virtually nothing to do with them, despite living here. But, they do have a completely different culture and even language.

The Irish govt. recently granted them " Ethnic " status, however. Under law then they are now considered distinct from 'normal', Irish people.

But, yeah, from what little I've ever gathered about them? It does seem reasonably well accepted that they are the descendants of Irish people, displaced (Some say by Cromwell) and who wandered ever since.

Doesn't take a genius, of course, to spot the anomaly there. But, I'm a grateful guest in this country and I'm not about to start second guessing the laws.

Don't want YouTube video's appearing, either; some hardy buck in a white vest, calling me out and saying he's steeped his hands in pitril!  ;D
GAITES (Alverstoke / Bath Pre 1850)
CURTIS (Portsmouth & 1800's Berkshire).
BURGE (Dorset, Somerset and Hampshire)
HUNTLEY (Dorset, Hampshire, Sussex, 'Surroundings')

Offline Puffin81

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Re: Irish traveller surnames
« Reply #48 on: Friday 25 January 19 22:14 GMT (UK) »
So to become an Irish gypsy you had to lose your home and job & be nomadic, live by own means and camp?

I've never watched that (Said to be) appalling programme. I did hear it said, though, that it pretty much Only featured Pav's.

I must say; Your idea of how one would become a Pav actually sounds just about spot on!  :D I mean; I actually have virtually nothing to do with them, despite living here. But, they do have a completely different culture and even language.

The Irish govt. recently granted them " Ethnic " status, however. Under law then they are now considered distinct from 'normal', Irish people.

But, yeah, from what little I've ever gathered about them? It does seem reasonably well accepted that they are the descendants of Irish people, displaced (Some say by Cromwell) and who wandered ever since.

Doesn't take a genius, of course, to spot the anomaly there. But, I'm a grateful guest in this country and I'm not about to start second guessing the laws.

Don't want YouTube video's appearing, either; some hardy buck in a white vest, calling me out and saying he's steeped his hands in pitril!  ;D

Disclaimer - I only watch the wedding programme as they film a quite bit where I live.

Iíd imagine there are a lot of gypsies created in Ireland due to all the poverty and troubles in the 1800s, I think itís estimated around half the population left for either mainland England or the USA

Offline hushiebaa

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Re: Irish traveller surnames
« Reply #49 on: Tuesday 26 February 19 15:42 GMT (UK) »
Hello, My Mother - in - Law asked me to look into her family history, especially the story that her Gt, Gt Grandfather met her Grandmother when he came over to Appleby Fair and that he was an Irish Traveller. I dont really know how to find out if this is true. I can certainly verify that he was Irish the census' has him born abt 1830 Banbridge, County Down. His name was Richard McCullough. Any help would be gratefully received