Author Topic: Gipsy Dan Boswell  (Read 55710 times)

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #216 on: Sunday 10 July 16 08:25 BST (UK) »
never ever forget, people in my mind and through time from what I have learned have always spoke bad and not truly understood what is known as the Gipsys, the truth is the Gipsys have always been on the run, from the dawn of the first flight, right up to the dark dark days of the early 1900s, a time in my mind that was the beginning not of the end but a new beginning, in my mind so much changed after the Great War, maybe I will dwell on that another time, below is just a little thing now for you to dwell on yourself before I start into the story, and remember I was going to write about the War, but no, there is so much sorrow and screams I feel it is for others to tell which of course they have and a sorrowful tale is told,

 




                               Dundee evening telegraph Thursday 19 august 1920

                                            GIPSIES CHANGED BY THE WAR.

                                               Now Attend Places of Worship. 
 
The travels of the gipsies from the Bohemian Estate, Southend, to the harvest fields in the midlands and West is now taking place. Until lately there have been as many as 250 caravans on the estate, which is the gipsies' freehold, and the migrants will return at the beginning of winter. The war has brought about a deemed change in the habits of these people, writes the Southend correspondent. Quite a number of them now attend places of worship in the vicinity of the encampment, a thing quite unknown before. Numbers of them lost relatives who served with the Forces, a fact which has brought them in to a closer touch with the villagers. Some of the caravans, too, are pictures- of neatness. Children in a good many hammocks slung beneath the wheel their parents occupying the bunks inside. The gipsies arrived in the neighborhood about sixteen years ago, their travels are gradually diminishing. Some go away on the summer exodus and fail to return; others become prosperous and take houses.


IV. AFFAIRS OF EGYPT, 1909 
By Thomas William Thompson

  All that is given below is a short precis, alas! Frequently couched
In uncouth 'journalese,' 
  The year 1909 was ushered in by the sequel to the Boxing Day
Quarrels of the Gypsies encamped on the Bohemian Estate, Eastwood, Southend.
This estate is partly owned and partly rented by about twenty-five or thirty
Families of Gypsies, who make it their permanent home. They are divided into
Two distinct camps the converted Gypsies, the Buckley’s and Smiths and their
Connections; and a varied mob of unregenerate pos-rats and ' mumpers ' belonging
to the families Smith, Stone, Bibby, Draper, Scarett, Webb, Livermore, Harris,
Laws, etc. Skirmishes naturally take place between the rival factions, whilst
Internal disturbances are almost as rife 


when I have finished writing  I will ask Questions, and I do hope someone will find the time to help, the writing will take several days or weeks, I have bits of paper  all over the place, then when I read some of them ,I,v no clue what they mean, just a date on them and say some words like Henry Wiltshire was poaching, when and where he was poaching I don't even know, so I have been updating my research techniques and trying to order things, but still I will just write in a fashion of my own talk, I would be very grateful if any of you Roots Chatters will help in my research about the Gipsys I will soon write about,

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #217 on: Sunday 10 July 16 08:41 BST (UK) »
so I will start, start with a steady hand to, start with conviction, start with Pride, Pride and Respect, Respect for all the long Dead, and  if you could but wait now till the end of the story, to think deep yourself on what I am about to write I would be obliged and thankful for your kind patience, this is a sad story, but still one that should be told and expanded on,


                                  Newcastle journal Monday 29 June 1914


                                                       LONDON LETTER. 

                           THE ASSASSINATION OF THE ARCHDUKE FERDINAND.

                                                  (BY PRIVATE WIRE.)

                                             (From Our Own Correspondent.)

                                                               London.


Sunday Evening. London has been thrilled to-night by the tidings of the assassination of the Archduke Francis Ferdinand of Austria and his wife, which became generally known in the course of the evening through the publication of special editions of some of the Sunday newspapers and the posting of the news on the windows of Fleet Street offices. The first feeling which everywhere found expression was one of sympathy with the aged Emperor Francis Joseph, who, after a life of storm and sorrow, has been thus suddenly bereft in tragic circumstances the heir to the dual monarchy. It is only some seven months or so since the Archduke and his Consort visited England as the guests of the King and Queen at Windsor, prior to which they spent a few days privately in London, where they went about a good deal, and were enthusiastically greeted whenever they drove through the streets. The Archduke was a man of fine physique, and his handsome, vigorous personality impressed all who saw him. There is no doubt also that the cordiality of his reception at the hands of the public made a strong impression on the mind of the distinguished visitor. It may remembered that, after taking leave of their Royal hosts at Windsor on November 22, the Archduke and his Consort travelled to Welbeck, and were the guests of the Duke and Duchess of Portland until the end of the following week. Although the visit to England was not concerned with any business diplomacy, was believed at the time that it was bound to have a satisfactory influence on the relations between this country and Austria- Hungary.

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #218 on: Sunday 10 July 16 08:55 BST (UK) »

                             Leamington spar courier Friday 4 September 1914

                 A LOCAL  LADY'S EXPERIENCES. AMID AUSTRIAN WAR PREPARATIONS.


A leamington lady living in the Avenue Road, who left her home in June for three mouths’ tour on the (Continent, to be spent chiefly in Austria, has had an experience which may well be described interesting though not devoid of anxiety and apprehension, being it was right in the centre, geographically, of the beginning of things which are having such terrific issues. The first part of the tour was spent at Munich, Manx, and Salzburg. From Salzburg Miss X went to Gratz. Two days after her arrival occurred the assassination of the Arch-duke Ferdinand, an event which started state of unrest throughout Austria as, continuing her travels. Miss X soon discovered. But everywhere she went the hotels were full visitors, especially at Bad Gastrin. Where large number English people had gone for the cure. From Gratz* Miss X journeyed Innsbruck, which she reached at the end of the week in July. Here she had rooms at the Hotel I ‘Europe. Where she found great number of Austrian officers were staying, and whither also came four Arch-dukes with whose dress, appearance, and bearing she was much impressed. They were magnificent men—tall, big, handsome—brave looking in their uniforms. And with many medals decorating their breasts. Indeed, the military rig-out ought to have been worth looking at considering it took four men to dress an officer, performance which could be witnessed by anyway passing down the corridor, the door of the room of the officer in question being wide open. The most magnificent military personage of all. said Miss X to Courier representative, was the Archduke who is now (commander-in-Chief of the Austrian Army. But it was at Trafoi that things had a more serious aspect. The town was full of officers and soldiers. They covered valley, hill, and mountain height. It was evident that mobilisation was going on. Although visitors were told that only an inspection was taking place. Asking if preparations were being made for war. “War! No," replied the Hotel Manager; "it is only paper war. Don’t fight with weapons nowadays." "Well." answered Miss X “all i can say is that it looks uncommonly like it." Crossing by the Stelvio pass by diligence into Italy she arrived at From this place she travelled to Florence, and ten days after her arrival came the declaration of war. The first intimation the English had of this tragic proclamation was on Sunday morning when, arriving at the church attached to the British Embassy for the o’clock service the people were met by the verger who told them there would service, the chaplain (a locum the regular minister being in England on his holiday) having been suddenly ordered to proceed to Malta the next day to join his regiment. " Guerra , Guerra” ("War, War”) was the explanation. War it truly was. And one in which England had been forced to take part. Week later visitors were not to envied. letters came through, banks closed down, and it was impossible to get any money. Their days were spent at Cooks, who advised everybody to remain where they were. One morning they were told it was not thought possible that any English people would be able leave Florence before Christmas. But at last news arrived that Cooks had succeeded in securing from the Government steamer the Critic leaving Genoa. It was expressly for the accommodation of British subjects first and then for Americans if there was any room left. In a very short time —barely an hour—Miss X packed and with difficulty procured a passport. The kindness of the Italians was beyond everything. She had but little money and her landlady would take payment. "do you think i could take your money? ho, Signora, not for one minute; i would rather lend you some till you get to England." This was typical of treatment received generally. All were thankful to reach Genoa, and after two days there to board the friendly Critic, for friendly it was truly found to be. Captain, officers, doctor and stewards worked hard. And so did the lady passengers, who, after every meal, helped the stewards in the pantry " wash up”. The voyage was without any undue scares. Italy said Miss X, is now quite for war. At Florence entraining was splendidly carried out. There was no excitement, but everything has been done thoroughly and quietly, no one imagined that there were barracks near, so quiet was the town at night. All over Italy the people are prepared to guard their towns, every citizen over 50 being told off for this specific duty. The Italians love the English, and ready to stand by us, said Miss X.


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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #219 on: Sunday 10 July 16 09:48 BST (UK) »
 like I have stated I will not write the many thousands of words that I had ready, be it that some were in my head some on scraps of paper and much in order but I would have got there, but  no, people must if they wish use the few words I transcribe as a guide for their own research on the past events, I will talk much soon of the Gipsys , it is just a basic outline I am giving, you would be well to forget all the talk about Germans, Germans this Germans that, that's all I ever new when I was young, far more went on and had a terrible impact on the Gipys of Britain , a savage story I will soon tell of the cruel plight of the Gipsys of these lands, all will become clear, Liston to the points I make, then do your own research, I think the Great War myself could of and should of been avoided, intern the Second World War descended on this nation, through the birth of the first, I will only tell of the beginning of the 1900s, like I have stated forget about Germans as in it was just us and them,

what I have found is they say Death is a certainty, well, I know it dosent sound good but War War War , is all I have found over and before the early 1900s, you have the Ottoman Empire, the British Empire, the Austrian Hungarian empire, the Pan Slavic Nations lead by the Mighty Russians, much went on, Nationalism, Imperialism, Empires, to be won and lost, and you tell me through all my research Gipsys living in an old wagon ,in a field or on some abandoned dirt road new of any of these things, there was no televisions or radios that they would tuned into, and what of the Back Hand, what of the East India Company, what of General Gordan and the Sudan, what of the plight of the Zulus, the Suez Canal, I read the Chief of Egypt  offloaded is share to Queen Victoria for many millions in secret, there was the alliances here there and everywhere, War War War, Money Greed and Power, betrail deceit lies , even Lions lead by Donkeys, you must all research the Royal Familys of the Great War, did you know there mostley related, I will not go into the details of the many things I have found, but again why again did the Gipsys of Britain suffer, 


On 31 July 1914, Tsar Nicholas II ordered the full mobilisation of the Russian Army in response to Germany’s obvious preparations for war in the east. Enver Pasha, the Ottoman Minister for War, reacted by ordering the full mobilisation of the Ottoman Army. On 2 August he signed a secret treaty with the German Ambassador. Although this was essentially a defensive military alliance, calling on each party to come to the other’s aid against an attack by Russia, it revealed Enver Pasha’s view as to who was the Ottoman Empire’s most important friend – and who was its most bitter enemy
                                                             
                                                             Slavs
                                               
                                                extract  from   pan Slavism

many Pan-Slavs looked for leadership as well as for protection from Austro-Hungarian and Turkish rule. Russian Pan-Slavists, however, altered the theoretical bases of the movement. Adopting the Slavophile notion that western Europe was spiritually and culturally bankrupt and that it was Russia’s historic mission to rejuvenate Europe by gaining political dominance over it, the Pan-Slavists added the concept that Russia’s mission could not be fulfilled without the support of other Slav peoples, who must be liberated from their Austrian and Turkish masters and united into a Russian-dominated Slav confederation.

                                                             The black hand


                                               extract from Spartacus educational 

                                                                 Black Hand
 
In May 1911, ten men in Serbia formed the Black Hand Secret Society. Early members included Colonel Dragutin Dimitrijevic, the chief of the Intelligence Department of the Serbian General Staff, Major Voja Tankosic and Milan Ciganovic.
The main objective of the Black Hand was the creation, by means of violence, of a Greater Serbia. Its stated aim was: "To realize the national ideal, the unification of all Serbs. This organisation prefers terrorist action to cultural activities; it will therefore remain secret."

                                                   Austo Hungarian empire

                          extract from Austrian Hungarian empire ww1   alfa history

Austria-Hungary before World War I was an empire, the largest political entity in mainland Europe. It spanned almost 700,000 square kilometers and occupied much of central Europe: from the mountainous Tyrol region north of Italy, to the fertile plains of the Ukraine, to the Transylvanian mountains of Eastern Europe. Eleven major ethno-language groups were scattered across the empire: Germans, Hungarians, Polish, Czech, Ukrainian, Slovak, Slovene, Croatians, Serbs, Italians and Romanians. Like Germany, the Austro-Hungarian Empire was a new state comprised old peoples and cultures; it was formed in 1867 by a compromise agreement between Vienna and Budapest.

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #220 on: Sunday 10 July 16 09:59 BST (UK) »
                                                    extract from Authentic history

                                                                   Imperialism
 
One of the main causes of the First World War was imperialism: an unequal relationship, often in the form of an empire, forced on other countries and peoples, resulting in domination and subordination of economics, culture, and territory. Historians disagree on whether the primary impetus for imperialism was cultural or economic, but whatever the reason, Europeans in the late 19th century increasingly chose to safeguard their access to markets, raw materials, and returns on their investments by seizing outright political and military control of the undeveloped world.  Between the 1850s and 1911, all of Africa was colonized 
 
except for Liberia and Ethiopia.  The British, who had imposed direct rule on India in 1858, occupied Egypt in 1882, probably a strategic necessity to protect their Indian interests. The French, who had begun missionary work in Indochina in the 17th century, finished their conquests of the region in 1887, and in 1893 they added to it neighbouring Laos and a small sliver of China. 

After 1897 Europeans began staking out “spheres of influence” in China, and the Dutch gradually expanded their old Company holdings to include all of modern day Indonesia. In 1911, Italy conquered Libya from the Ottoman Empire, providing glory and the opportunity to relieve the population pressures in the south.  In the East, Russia completed the Trans-Siberian Railroad (1891-1903) and established itself as a major Pacific power.  Only Japan managed to contain European aggression by adopting European industrial techniques,  Germany, a late arrival at the imperialism game, achieved only a limited empire in East and southwest Africa, and on the coast of China.  Although Germany successfully established colonies in the Pacific Southwest 
 
By 1914 the net result of imperialism was a world in which the Western powers had established themselves competitively on every continent. Britain had an empire 140 times its own size; Belgium, an empire 80 times its size; Holland, 60 times; and France, 20 times.

                                                 
                                                     
                                                     The British Empire

                 
                   extract from the British Empire ww1 then click on colonial troops


Race, empire and colonial troops When the great powers went to war in 1914, they didn’t start a European war, but a world war. At the start of World War One, the whole of Africa, except Ethiopia and Liberia, was under European rule, and Great Britain and France controlled the two largest colonial empires. They would draw on them extensively for both human and material sources. Even by conservative estimates, well over 4 million non-white men were mobilised into the European and American armies during the War, in both combat and non-combat roles. This section gives a small glimpse into their experiences. 


                                             extract from royal family's of ww1

The First World War saw millions of men separated from their families and sent to the front line but very few were pitted against their relations.
For the royals, however, World War I truly was a family affair.
A new documentary has revealed how the roots of the Great War lay partly in the tangled web of Royal family relationships - in particular that of the British-hating Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany and his cousins, George V  of Britain and Tsar Nicholas of Russia.
 
 
for all the Royal Family search this web site I found it very interesting

European Monarchs at the Start of World War I 

 

 

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #221 on: Sunday 10 July 16 17:49 BST (UK) »
                                            Northampton mercury 7 august 1914

                                                DIARY OF THE WAR CRISIS.
                                               CHRONOLOGICAL SUMMARY.

June 29—Assassination of the Archduice Franz Ferdinand (heir to the Austrian throne) and his wife by Pan-Servian conspirators.

 July 2. —Austria presents ultimation   to Servia, demanding, cessation of the greater-Servia agitation.
 
July 25.—Russia asks For extension   for Servia. Austria refuses.

 July 26.—Servia gives reply which Austria considers evasive, and the Ambassador leaves Belgrade. Servian mobilisation begins. Belgrade evacuated and seat of Government transferred to Nish.

July 27.—Sir  E Grey proposes mediation France, Germany  Italy and Great Britain to prevent a quarrel between Austria and Russia that would drag in all of Europe. First shots in the war fired Servian troops on the Danube.

 July 28.—Austria declares war. Russia at once begins to mobilise her southern and south-western armies,
 
July 29.—Belgrade bombarded. Russia threatens full mobilisation, Kaiser holds all-night council with his Ministers and officers.

 July 30.—Belgrade occupied by Austrian troops.

July 31.—Martial law proclaimed in Germany. Germany demands explanation of Russia’s military preparation.

Aug. 1. —Germany declares war on Russia. German troops invade Luxemburg. British Naval Reserves called out.
 
Aug. 2. —Sir E. Grey gives conditional assurances of British assistance to France. Naval battle in Baltic between Germans and Russians. Latter’s fleet driven back. Germans capture Aland Islands. German ultimatum presented to Belgium.
 
Aug. 4.—England presents untimatum to Germany regarding neutrality of Belgium and, later, declares war.




 so I have been looking at many many books and references and before World War 1 started, there was a series of alliances between many European countries. 

 France, Britain and Ireland, and Russia formed an alliance known as the

                                                   "Triple Entente".

Germany was allied with Austria-Hungry. They were known as the

                                                    "Central Powers".
 
Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the heir to the throne of Austria-Hungary, was assassinated in Sarajevo on 28th June 1914, it  resulted in World War 1.
    
  Austria-Hungary,  blamed Serbia for the death of the Archduke,   they placed harsh demands on serbia. Germany sided with Austria-Hungary, Russia backed Serbia, Serbia looked to Russia as the leader of the Slavic Race, the Game was on.    

the War began on July 28, 1914 and lasted until November 11, 1918. 

The two main sides were 

                                           France, Great Britain and Russia

                                                            the foe was

                                              Germany and Austria-Hungary

 later a   total of 30 countries  would become involved. Italy, once part of the Triple Alliance with Germany and Austria-Hungary,  they then changed to fight with  the Allies.
 
I will not talk of the War, search yourself, a cruel time.



these are the facts that I have found in a small part,

now around this time of great agitation what of the Gipsys of Britain, let us see a few facts of the  times before we move on

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #222 on: Sunday 10 July 16 18:38 BST (UK) »
 

                                   ANNUAL REPORT OF MEDICAL OFFICER

                               Middlesex chronicle Saturday 31 January 1914
                                                     
                                                  The Gipsy Nuisance.
 
The Clerk read a letter from the Commissioner of Police, New Scotland Yard, with reference to the nuisance caused by a number of gipsies camping in August, etc., on each side the watersplash in the village of Cranford, and stating that attention would be paid to the matter the local police in order to prevent gipsies remaining at the spot in question, and adding that if any begging, by children, came under the notice of the police, the necessary action would be taken.—Mr, Whittington moved the following motion with reference to this matter: “That this Council respectfully wishes to pay the serious attention of His Majesty’s Secretary of State for the Home Department to the fact that under the present condition of the law there is no power to abate the rapidly increasing nuisance and annoyance caused to the residents and others by hordes of gipsies and other van dwellers camping and squatting upon the roadsides in their own and adjoining districts, and to urge that all necessary steps be taken to so amend or extend the law that the authorities in Middlesex and adjoining counties may quickly be invested with the necessary powers to prevent continuance such intolerable nuisance. That a copy of this resolution be sent to the whole the surrounding authorities, and to the County Councils of Middlesex, Surrey, Buckinghamshire and Hertfordshire, asking them to support the same by sending a similar resolution to the Home Secretary.—Mr. Lee seconded, and this was unanimously agreed to.
                   

                         Buckingham advertiser and free press Saturday 11 April 1914

                                                             GIPSIES.

The Mayor
the adoption of the recommendation that this Council respectfully desire to draw the serious attention to his Majesty’s Secretary of State for the Home Department to the fact that under the present condition the law there is power to abate the rapidly increasing nuisance and annoyance caused to the residents and others of hordes of gipsies and other van dwellers camping and squatting upon the roadside in their own and adjoining districts, and to urge that all necessary steps be taken to so amend or extend the law on the subject, that local authorities may quickly be invested with the necessary powers prevent continuation of such intolerable nuisance. Councillor F. Adcock seconded. Councillor H. R. Harrison moved amendment to leave  out the words hordes of.  he did not think it was a description that should be applied to human beings. He knew that the word "horde ” was applied to dwellers in tents and wagons, but the same time it was closely allied to the term herd, which applied to the lower animals. He did not think they would like to be described as a herd of Councillors; and "horde” was to his mind hardly a suitable term to apply to human beings. The Mayor said the Councillors did not wander about in tents and vans. (Laughter.) Councillor R. E. Bennett thought there were several words in the resolution that might have been improved upon. But the resolution would not apply much to that district. He seconded the amendment, remarking that he believed the resolution would even then be sufficiently strong. . .  the amendment was accepted without a division, and the resolution as amended carried.

                                         Buckingham advertiser and free press 

                                                    Saturday 11 April 1914

 The committee recommended the adoption the resolution that had been received from Staines, and adopted by many public bodies, protesting against the nuisance caused by the camping of gipsies by the road sides, and asking for the local authorities to be given more power to deal with the matter. But  in the recommendation occurred the words hordes of Gipsies." Councillor H. R. Harrison took exception to the word hordes,' as it appeared to be allied to the word “herd, and which was applied as a rule to animals, and therefore should not be  Applied to human beings. It was decided to delete the word hordes. The dictionary, however, gives the definition of “horde” a tribe dwelling in tents wagons and wandering about. And which seems very applicable to the gipsy tribe.



this is what I know about the word Horde, but in 1914 it is plain to see what the authoritys thought about the People known as Gipsys

Horde Origen,    a tribe or troop of tartar or other nomads deriving from polish ” horda”
 turkish “ordu”…. royal camp, turdic tarta , “udar”
  An army or tribe of nomadic warriors
Horde a moving pack, swarm of animals
Horde of barbarians ,savage or uncivilized people, a large group, a moving pack, swarm of animals, a tribe or troupe of Asian nomads
A wandering troop or gang especially a clan or tribe of a nomadic people migrating from place to place for the sake of pasturage and plunder
A large existed crowd, frightening and unpleasant
For it was in the primal horde that the first murder was performed, and this has haunted mankind ever since.
We should recall that man did not originally evolve in a liberal democracy, but in the primal horde


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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #223 on: Sunday 10 July 16 19:16 BST (UK) »
I will just put this on before I move on , something to think about, a Gipsys life and warmth for His Family was not worth the price of a bundle of wood, I could put hundreds of accounts on here of such cases, bear this in mind when I continue my writing

                                         Sheffield daily telegraph july 11 1871

                                               ROTHERHAM POLICE COURT.


 MONDAY.—Before G. W. Chambers, Etq., CoL St. IIEGF.B, and Jab. Yatks, Esq.     Gipsies Fined for Stealing Underwood at Wentworth —Joseph Wilsher and Joseph Wilsher. uncle and nephew, gipsies, were charged with stealing six bundles of underwood, the property of Earl Fitzwilliam, from & wood situated between Wentworth and Brampton Ball Head, about five o'clock that morning. Mr. Whitfield prosecuted, and Mr. Willis defended. It appeared that the prisoners, with a party of gipsies, where encamped near the wood, and took the fuel for their camp fire.— They were discharged on the payment of damages, and expenses.


I have traced the movements of these Serbian Gipsys across Britain, they sure get up to allsorts, but truly they are hounded like the Horde, on several accounts the authority's maybe thought they where evan spies, strange when  more than likely most Gipsys of Britain are likely evan in a far way to share an ancestry directly or through Relatives with these Serbian Gipsys, so the Serbian Gipsys may be spies, and must be sent to an unprohibited area, and what of there long Cousins the hordes of Britain, soon you will see how no longer they are valued by the bundle of wood they steal to warm and feed there Children, yes soon you will see the value of there body's, or should I say price, it is a strange time indeed, yes a strange time when Gipsys of Britain became not the plundering horde but something of great value, I will leave the final judgment to you,of course we all see things through our own eyes.                     




                                         Daily record Thursday 16 December 1916

                                                         SERBIAN GIPSIES.

                                      STROLLING BAND HALTED BY MIDLOTHIAN POLICE.

 A considerable number of people were attracted to Pathhead yesterday afternoon, where the Midlothian police had stopped twenty persons composing a Serbian native encampment, who, with horses, donkeys, and performing bears, were travelling "to Edinburgh Waverley Market Carnival. They had journeyed on road from London, giving entertainments at many villages. The men. accompanied  by a police constable, proceeded to Dalkeith. They explained matters, but being without passports they were ordered to go  back to the Scottish borders into an unprohibited area.

 

Offline panished

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #224 on: Saturday 16 July 16 13:39 BST (UK) »
   

                                                         First World War


                                                   “Your country needs you”


Yes, it was not long, not long at all,no not long before Britain new, the politians new, the generals new, they new and understood Britain could no longer carry on in the fight of what came to be known as the Great War, as brave as brave could be the body count of the volunteers and standing army were being decimated on the front line, a very savage and brutal war was being fought with what seem now antiquated rules of engagement, yes best suited in my view to the Wars of a previous era, horses were still being used with echoes of the fabled infamous disaster known to us all as the "charge of the light brigade", yes Great Britain on declaring war with Germany in August 1914, new now at this defing moment, maybe they always new, yet now they new and it had become obvious that it was not possible to continue fighting by relying on voluntary recruits and what was left of the bravest of men whos comrades now litter the fields of Europe   

Under the poster campaigned by Lord Kitchener which in its self had encouraged over one million men to enlist by January 1915 yet now through the death and mounting casualties
Conscription  was mentioned and inturn evan thoe  200,000 are said to have demonstrated in London, conscription was introduced, what does this meen to me and you, well compulsory active service, it is true through many accounts I have read parliament and the people were divided, it is stated that the French army was near to collapse,
 
In March 1916 the Military Service Act was passed. Conscription on all single men aged between 18 and 41 was imposed, but exempted the medically unfit, teachers and clergymen, A second Act passed in May 1916 extended conscription to married men. in the first year over one million enlisted. 

In 1918 during the last months of the war, the Military Service (No. 2) Act raised the age limit to 51.  It is stated that over two million men would eventually be conscripted ,
I have read many many accounts of these times and facts ,they do differ and change but that as to be expected, I have watched hour after hour of many many documentarys of the great war, they are all there to whatch if you have a computer, a very very savage time, I will soon show you the effects on the Gipsys of Britain, the storys are very sad, it is true no one in my mind ever as liked truly Gipsys in any time scale, a bit of a fascination, yes to some, a good bit of study for others, a way to make a name for yourself, I have never really read of much that I think is honest and true, I am trying to learn things about Relatives of my Mothers, intern I hope I will help others and most  importantly thoe I am a nobody and just a bit of a scag end, I will be the voice for the long Dead Gipsys, I choose and draw no distinction, no barrier, I place none higher or Lower, yet I am mindful of the quote from also a long Dead Man who like the Gipsys lives this day in my words,

                            "The first shall be last and the Last shall be first"