Author Topic: Gipsy Dan Boswell  (Read 57280 times)

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #234 on: Saturday 16 July 16 14:16 BST (UK) »
 
                                                           "Gipsy Hunts"
 
                                      Extract from the web site  western Europe
 

In 1734, the Landgrave of Hesse offered six “Reichstaler” for every “Gypsy” captured alive, and half the amount for every killed one.

 Incentives of this kind were at the basis of the notorious “Gypsy hunts”, during which the Roma were hunted like game by the town people.

 In Saxony, such houndings were called “Kesseltreiben” and were considered public entertainment.

In the inherited Austrian territories the Roma were not treated less brutally than in other parts of the Holy Roman Empire. Only in Hungary, more exactly in the western parts of Hungary, which had stayed under the reign of Habsburg after the Turkish invasion, some local rulers tended to tolerate the Roma as long as they could be useful. For instance, György Thurzo, Palatine of the Hungarian Empire, in 1616 allowed a group of Roma to settle on his territory and to go about their work as smiths, which was useful for the Hungarian nobility for war

When I have been researching I have found out that nothing is knew under the sun, I have researched also conscription, well the ideal and feel of this strange savage cruel yet to be argued needed forced armed bondage, The Gipsys don’t need the likes of me talking for them, they are strong and Proud, what did they know of the Black Hand, and their Slavic fight for Freedom, what did the Gipsys of Britain know of the rivalries of the European monarchs, I tell you what they did no, they havue been a despised People from the dawn of their first flight, unlike what as been writen I would say they are a mixed People with a mixed lanuage that replects the many times and countrys ,pluss the many People they have met along the way, I am learning day by day from joining RootsChat, and soon will ask some questions, I hope Relatives now and in the future will join this web site and learn to through my words and others, try and read all the storys I will soon tell, if I get something wrong know I am on my own terms speaking for the long Dead Gipsys, only They may judge me

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #235 on: Saturday 16 July 16 14:20 BST (UK) »
                 


                                                    Quote from Jane Austen



Imagine that your beloved husband or son suddenly disappeared after meeting friends at a neighborhood bar, and that you would not know for months what had happened to them. You fear that he has been taken by a pressgang.

In Jane Austen’s time, Great Britain fought long wars over land and sea. Since medieval times it had been the royal prerogative to impress free men into a seamen’s service. The custom was roundly condemned, except in cases of

              “necessity of the sudden coming in of strange enemies into the kingdom.”

During times of war, “the temptation of impressment” was “too strong to be resisted by Parliament.” And so pressgang would roam towns and the countryside to take men against their will to serve in His Majesty’s navy

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #236 on: Saturday 16 July 16 14:25 BST (UK) »
                                       Newcastle courant Saturday 26 April 1729


                                                         LONDON, April 19   

 Last Saturday a young Fellow was pressed as he was going to Church with his Bride to be married, the Bride begged hard to be married before they carried him off, but this being a Religious Press Gang, they would carry him off before Marriage, because they said it would be a Sin to part Man and Wife.



                                      Stamford mercury Wednesday 21 march 1716


last Saturday a Press-Gang being in the Strand, had Information of a Sailor lodging in near the Water-side, the Lieutenant of the Gang going up to his Chamber, and the Sailor having notice of it, leaped out of a Window two Pair of Stairs,, into the Thames and was drowned.



                                          Calonian mercury Thursday 3 February 1726
 

The Press for Seamen continues very hot, most of the Merchant Ships in the River being cleared of their Men ; and we suddenly expect to hear a Call made for the Watermen, of whom several Thou- sands may be spared. A Press-gang having the other Day taken one of the Harponiers belonging to the Greenland Ships, the Men resisted, and wounded the Lieutenant of the Gang so dangerously , that 'tis reported he is since dead.
Newcastle courant Saturday 17 November 1739



                                        Extract of a Letter from Liverpool; Nov. 13.


Yesterday the Press-Gang of one of his Majesty's Tenders boarded a Jamaica Ship which was just come in; and carried off not only such of the Crew as they inclined, but even impressed the Mate, whom they also fondly drubbed, for pretending to tell them they were doing amiss. This Morning he broke out of the Tender's Hold, and stripping, thought to have escaped by swimming, but unfortunately perished. The Merchants here are drawing up Remonstrance’s to the Admiralty on this affair.


                                     Hampshire chronicle Monday 18 august 1777


A terrible affray happened on Monday at Hungroad about ten miles from Bristol, between the press-gang under the command Lieut. Brice, and the crews of a Jamaica fleet just come in. The poor fellows had no sooner landed on terra firma and made the hearts of thousands glad by the seight they had brought home, than a gang, under the sanction of a press-warrant, attempted to force them on board their tender the honest tars roused with indignation resisted, and in the affray one sailor lost his life, and eight or ten were desperately wounded.



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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #237 on: Saturday 16 July 16 14:30 BST (UK) »

                                 Newcastle courant Saturday 17 November 1739


                                     Extract of a Letter from Liverpool; Nov. 13.


Yesterday the Press-Gang of one of his Majesty's Tenders boarded a Jamaica Ship which was just come in; and carried off not only such of the Crew as they inclined, but even impressed the Mate, whom they also fondly drubbed, for pretending to tell them they were doing amiss. This Morning he broke out of the Tender's Hold, and stripping, thought to have escaped by swimming, but unfortunately perished. The Merchants here are drawing up Remonstrance’s to the Admiralty on this affair.



                                          Ipswich journal Saturday 26 march 1726


A homeward bound Ship newly arrived from France, having the usual Visit paid them by a Man of War's Boat, all the Crew locked themselves up in their Chests, except those that were absolutely necessary for the Safety of the Ship, by which Stratagem they escaped the Press. Last Week as a Labourer was going over Black-Heath to work, he met with four Fellows who pressed the poor Man , but he begging heartily, and telling them his Family must starve, &c. they yielding to his ln- treaties, provided he would give them some Money, which he complying, they marched off. In a quarter of an Hour he falls into another Gang, with a Lieu- tenant, who likewise stopped him, upon which he be- moans his Condition, saying, it was a very ill Fortune to be pressed twice in a Day, that he had not one Farthing left, having given half a Guinea and three Shillings to the other Press Gang. The Lieutenant hearing the Story went in Quest of those who had extorted the Money from him, and found them car- rousing at an Ale- House, and that they were the Press-Masters; upon which he ordered the Labourer his Money, set him at Liberty and carried off the other Chaps.

 
   
                                          Newcastle courant Saturday 5 June 1725


                                                             London, May 27.   


Yesterday a Sessions of Admiralty was held at the Old Baily, and three Persons were found guilty of several Pyracies and Felonies com- mitted by them in the West Indies. The Pyrates that acted on board the Revenge, lately taken in the Orkneys on the North of Scotland, were also found guilty of divers Pyracies and Murders committed by them. John Smith the Captain of the said Pyrate Ship refusing to plead, had his Thumbs drawn with Whip-cord, and he is to be pressed to Day, unless he submits to plead guilty or not guilty.


                                          Newcastle courant Friday 5 January 1739


                                              From several London Prints, Dec. 29,


We hear that last Night Letters came to the Admiralty- Office from Vice Admiral Vernon in the West-Indies. The Cumberland, an 8o Gun Ship, that has for some time lain as a Guard-ship at Long-Reach, is ordered to be victualled with all Expedition for a Voyage. Yesterday a strong Press Gang, of about forty Sailors. and three Officers, visited Tower-Hill and the Parts adjacent, and swept off a good Number of Seamen for his Majesty's Service, who were immediately clapt on board the Tenders, lying off the Tower for that Purpose.


                                 Derby mercury Thursday 20 February 1794


A curious matter was heard on Monday before the Borough Police, respecting the wife of a gentleman at Sheerness, who had eloped with a black servant. They were pursued to the Nag's Head in the Borough on Sunday, where Blackey fired a pistol at his pursuers, for which he was taken up and committed. The Lady had two children by her husband. The matter we understand, is since settled in the following manner: The husband took her two children and all the property he found in the coach, de- sired his wife to go where she pleased, after she said she'd live with no other but the Black, and Mungo who was then taken by a press-gang, and put on board the tender.



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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #238 on: Saturday 16 July 16 14:38 BST (UK) »
                                   
 
strange how words linger,I know this is a different example
but who can not love words


                                 Portsmouth evening news Tuesday 25 June 1901
                                                       
                                                            Strawberry Land.


Under this title the Globe an interesting article on the cultivation of the strawberry in Hampshire, and remarks a tremendous growth of the culture of the sweet red berry in the district of which Salisbury is the centre From Fareham alone as many as twelve or thirteen 'strawberry trains' a day leave for London, and many as fifty tons have been known to off one day. Locally the price of the baskets starts at half-a-crown, for the six pounds, going down the height of the season to low as four pence and two pence a pound. The cultivation needs much time and care outside the harvest time. Annually the runners have to be taken up and new beds planted. Three years is the life of a bed. The third year it allowed to run wild, unhoed, unweeded, but yields, nevertheless, often good berries even in its old age. The coming of the loop line from Southampton to Portsmouth, over the Hamble at Bursledon Bridge, has opened out the country and made the markets more accessible. Last year, Royalty on its way back from a visit to the sick and wounded at Netley Hospital, hard by, drove round that way to see the fields, which scent the air for miles along the road. The gipsies are "pressed" into the service when the picking season begins. Hampshire is a great haunt of the gipsies, with its great waste of forest lands. There are more of them be found here than in any other county, and the diocese keeps a missioner specially to attend to their spiritual needs.


                              Hampshire advertiser Saturday 20 august 1904


That so short is the supply of harvest labourers in Hampshire that in one case a whole camp of gipsies was pressed into the service



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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #239 on: Saturday 16 July 16 14:49 BST (UK) »


                                                Aberdeen journal 31 may 1898

                                                         THE GIPSY TRIBES.

The frequent allusions cf late in the “Chronicie'’ to the gipsy tribe in the neighbourhood of Yetholm  writes  a correspondent recalls an incident the particulars of which are yet told at many a farmer's ingle in Aberdeenshire. It is well known that the 92nd, Gordon Highlanders, were raised in 1794 by the late Duke of Gordon, then Marquis Huntly. And by his mother, the beautiful, and witty Duchess Jane; but the method! By which the  thinned ranks of the regiment were once recruited during the Peninsular war, preceding the battle of Waterloo, has not became much a matter of history.

It appears that the county gentlemen of the shire were sorely beset how best to meet the ever-recurring applications for drafts from home, and in thier extremity they bethought themselves of a plan, the carrying out which would bring in its train a two-fold gain strengthening the ranks of the Gordons and

                               "clear the shires of the gang of tinkers and gipsies"


 which it was over run. The scheme was carried into effect with success, all the able-bodied tinkers being seized and conveyed to the nearest seaport. Few of them returned from the Peninsula, but the old pensioners were wont to declare that the tinkers were at once the greatest thieves and the smartest soldiers in the regiment. “Newcastle Chronicle.”

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #240 on: Saturday 16 July 16 14:50 BST (UK) »


                                                   Gipsies  pressed ganged 
 

                                                  The Essex Chronicle of 1779   
 

Monday, upwards of 30 stout fellows, who call themselves gypsies, and get their bread by plundering the poor country farmers of their livestock, having some intimation given them of their being likely to be pressed, cut off the first joint of their forefingers in order to avoid serving his Majesty.

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #241 on: Saturday 16 July 16 14:58 BST (UK) »
                 

                      Derbyshire times and chest field herald Saturday 24 November 1928


                                                    POLICE OBSTRUCTION

                                       Chesterfield Van Dwellers Summoned.


A disturbance in Knifesmith Gate, Chesterfield. had a sequel at the local Police Court Monday, when James Callender and Fred Shephard, van-dwellers, Bold Rodney Yard, Chesterfield, were summoned for obstructing a police constable while in the execution of his duty. P.c. Turner said that he was in plain clothes in Knifesmith Gate, when he considered it was his duty to arrest a man named Smith (who was accompanied by the two defendants) for being drunk and disorderly. When he caught hold of Smith Shephard said:

 “You leave him alone. You have no right to touch him when you have not got your proper clothes on. If you take him you are taking the three of us.”

As a result of the defendants’ obstruction witness eventually had to let Smith go, and his companions managed to get him away. Witness later chased them in company with another constable, to the Rodney Yard. where he arrested Smith, and told the two defendants that they would be reported. In reply to questions by the defendants, witness denied that he came out of the “King’s Head” With a bottle in his hand, adding that the allegation was ridiculous. Callender, in the witness-box. Said that the man Jack Smith had had a fit and shouted


“They killed my brother in the war, and you are not going to kill me. I’ll fight the lot of you.”


When P.c. Turner came up witness pointed out that Smith was not doing any harm, whereupon the constable squeezed his hand, and witness made him let go. There was no obstruction. Witness added, reply to Chief Inspector Parkin, that he really caught hold the constable’s thumb to make him release his hold. He saw the constable come from the direction of the “King’s Head.” but he would not swear he was carrying a bottle, although he had an object of some kind in his hand. Shephard said that he did not know P.c. Turner was policeman at the time, "as he was dressed rough,” he added. In fact he was dressed worse than myself. Turner, alleged witness, used bad language and said that he was not a constable. but afterwards stated that he might be. He certainly had a bottle his hand. At this stage the defendant burst into tears and cried out:


                                 “It was Flanders Day on Sunday. God help us .”


 In reply to Chief Inspector Parkin, who remarked that it was a  serious allegation to make, defendant repeated his previous statement with reference to the constable carrying a bottle. There was. he said, no obstruction, as he did not do anything to the constable. After the Bench had arrived at their decision in private, the Mayor ,'Coun. P. M. Robinson) said that the magistrates considered that the defendant had been very foolish, but in view of their previous good record they would be let off on payment of costs. Mr. W. Jaoques. AM- T. W. Lack, Mr. R. Eyre and Mr. G. J. Edmunds also adjudicated

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #242 on: Saturday 16 July 16 15:03 BST (UK) »


                                                 Belper news Friday 12 July 1918


                                                           THEFT OF BRASS.   

                                       ALLEGED RECEIVERS COMMITTED FOR TRIAL 


                Charged with receiving brass, Levi and his wife Minnie smith, john smith junr
                            of the bold Rodney yard Brampton chesterfield Derbyshire

                                          MR W.E.Wakerley defended john smith


Mr Wakerley said his client had been discharged from the Army on account of nervous debility. He did not usually deal in scrap metal and did not know the regulation regarding it. He Dealt, mostly in rags and bones,  Insp. Parkin said had known John Smith four years. He had been buying metal all his life when he could get hold of it. Witness had spoken to him about metal transactions at least 50 times, and he knew as much about the regulations as witness did. Prisoner was not very intelligent, but was possessed of any amount of low cunning.  Levi and Minnie smith were committed to the Quarter sessions for trial; the charge of receiving against John Smith was dismissed, but was fined for purchasing smaller quantity of brass than was allowed in law.