Author Topic: Gipsy Dan Boswell  (Read 57273 times)

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #189 on: Friday 05 February 16 19:50 GMT (UK) »
http://cms.nottinghamshire.gov.uk/archives-planofredlionstreet1923.pdf

    click on this above and a map comes up, zoom it up till you may read the yard names,

now look at Taylors  Yard, wow it backs on to Martins Yard, do you believe it, so Linda's relatives  was neighbours, well if they was around the same month, I would say they would be always on the move , and at the top of those Yards is Red Lion Street, Narrow Marsh, and right next to Martins Yard is St Johns Church , I read this got bombed out later and the St Patricks 1880 1979  at the top right of the map is the church I went to as a  young boy, the Church got burned out and redeveloped, then relocated to the Meadows area,  I was born in an area known as Sneinton just a few streets away from Narrow Marsh, and look where it says the Loggerheads  Public House, that was one of the only building still standing after the demolition of the 20s 30s and rebuilding of the area now called Cliff Road,

the Loggerheads is where my Mother would take me for some food when we knocked Cliff road, wow all those years ago Linda's Family maybe  went there, the many Wiltshire Men would of drank  there, many many Wiltshire Men and every way of spelling the name  roamed these areas  at one time or another plus they had  many pals,  dangerous people to , 


SEQUEL TO A HORSE DEAL


 these incidents  were reported in  the Nottingham press
 1909

during the hearing a case in which Joseph Thompson, commonly known as Slabbs,” aged 38, hawker, 51, Narrow-marsh, and Frederick Wiltshire, aged 35,  horse dealer, living in a travelling van standing in Hawthorne street, the Meadows, were charged with stealing  £23 from the person of Samuel Potter, Nottingham  horse dealer,   
 the two prisoners  said the prosecutor, each holding an arm, and Wiltshire deliberately took Potter’s   gold out of his inside pocket. When Potter resisted, -Wiltshire struck him a violent blow under the jaw. knocking him down, and both men remanded.

  see how still in 1909 they are still using the old name Narrow Marsh, that's a good bit of history
this is just local writing, unless you were there in 1909 that's all it will be
 

  1900


THIS DAY'S POLICE NEWS

  The nets. were ordered to be confiscated.—Charles Bacon, gipsy, ailing from Shirerbrook. was summoned  for  aiding and abetting Fred Wiltshire, Richard Elliott. and  John Gregory, in  tresspassing in search of game 


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  by Pete Leary


The Loggerheads Pub was the last remaining Public House and Inn in what was known as Narrowmarsh, (now called Cliff Road) an area immediately South of the Lacemarket in Nottingham's City Centre. It was said to be the 4th oldest surviving pub in Nottingham and dated back to around 1640. For centuries, this was a notorious area and historically dates back to the 9th century. The pub itself was once at the heart of Narrow Marsh and was frequented by Dick Turpin in the 18th century. Today, although not a pub, the building is the only surviving remnant from the area and its fascinating but unmasked past. This history is close to extinction but should and still could play a major role in education, tourism, entertainment and economic growth for Nottingham and the wider community
 
  Pub crawl 1868 style

 Starting on the corner of Carrington Street/Broad Marsh - Middle Marsh - Narrow marsh - Red lion Square.

 Distance less than half a mile: Pubs..............................................SIXTEEN

http://www.picturethepast.org.uk/frontend.php

search in this link saying Red Lion Street, Narrow Marsh about 40 photos come up,

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #190 on: Saturday 06 February 16 14:13 GMT (UK) »
this small extract is from this link below, go to the link for much more in-depth information
I have just highlighted a few words I think researchers would find of interest,
 http://www.nottsopenchurches.org.uk/
 
St John the Baptist, Leenside, was built to cater for the population of working people living on the flood prone areas of Broad Marsh, Middle Marsh and, the most notorious of the three, Narrow Marsh. Collectively, these were known as the ‘Marshes’.

The new church was planned in 1842 and consecrated in 1844.
       
The church of St John the Baptist, Leenside was located in probably the poorest part of the parish of St Mary the Virgin. 
 
 We regret that we are unable to answer queries regarding personal research, family history, etc, or to check on or provide information from parish registers, gravestones, monuments, or any other sources, as we do not hold information other than what is on this site. For this you might find the website of Nottinghamshire Ancestral Tourism useful.
With such a densely populated parish it is likely that a significant number were killed in the 1914-1918 war, but there is no record of a memorial in the 1937 inventory.
A public house, The Loggershead, only a few yards from the north side of St John’s did have a war memorial dedicated to the local men who were killed. This memorial has recently been re-housed within St Mary’s Church, the original mother church of St John the Baptist.

  on the 1882 OS map, a gate is also shown leading from Martin’s Yard at the south-west corner along a path to the south porch, and it appears that there was a main west doorway to the church leading directly onto Martin’s Yard.   

   early in the 1920s large scale housing clearance began. The residents were moved to new housing on council estates around the outskirts of the city  The courts, alleys and yards which formed the 1884 parish had passed into history   

   On the night 8th-9th May 1941 Nottingham was the target of a raid by the German airforce. St John’s, with many other buildings was destroyed by the high explosives and incendiary bombs that rained down on the city. 
 
 St John the Baptist Leenside was finally closed and demolished in 1946 ending its one hundred and two years of service.

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #191 on: Sunday 07 February 16 14:09 GMT (UK) »
 
A good bit of history

looks like Hawthorne street was a stopping place for the Wiltshire's
  1909 Frederick Wiltshire, aged 35,  horse dealer, living in a travelling van standing in Hawthorne street, this is the area called the Meadows,  now below William is there seven yeares later in 1916 its just south of the Marshes, Sneinton is to the East, St Anns more northwards but all join, this is where they may have kept there Wagons over the years, ready for when they took the notion to be on the move.


Nottingham 
  1916

IGNORANT OF THE LAW

  FAILURE TO REGISTER. The excuse that he was no scholar was offered by vandweller, named William Wiltshire, 39, of Hawthorne-street, who at the Nottingham Policecourt to-day was charged with being drunk and disorderly and also failing to Register

Now you have living at 25 Fyne Street Sneinton the Wiltshire's also using the name Wilsher same residence different name, same People.

Sneinton Nottingham
  1920


A DRUNKEN FRENZY

  NOTTINGHAM MAN DISCHARGES GUN IN STREET. The discharging a firearm in Fyne-street last night created quite a sensation among the residents, at the Nottingham Guildhall to-day,
James Wiltshire (45), described as a poacher, living 25,  Fyne- street  Sneinton
 
 “STAND BACK!” THREAT TO SHOOT NOTTM. POLICEMAN. EXCITING STREET AFFRAY.   . An exciting affair took place in  Fyne-street last night, as result of which James Wiltshire, aged 46. who  resided there appeared at the Nottingham Guildhall to-day 
 
SHOTS IN THE NIGHT

arrested, Wiltshire was found  to be mad drunk. Mr. W. E. (defending);

 Was he not firing in the air?

He was firing at us, One shot hit the wall in Fyne-street
NOTTINGHAM SHOOTING AFFRAY. PRISONER AGAIN REMANDED. Wiltshire. of Fyne-street.   discharging and threatening  an officer,  Nottingham Guildhall to-day, remanded 

NOTTM. HAWKER GETS  A MONTH FOR UNPROVOKED ASSAULT. 
at the Nottingham Guildhall  today James Wilsher 26. hawker. Fyne- Street   
 
1925

 NOTTINGHAM MAN. Said to have undergone the punishment of the cat, the birch, and penal servitude, James Thomas Wilsher, hawker, of 25. Fyne-street, Nottingham,
 was given two months imprisonment at the Guildhall to-day for being suspected person, and loitering.

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #192 on: Wednesday 10 February 16 20:27 GMT (UK) »
 me


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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #193 on: Friday 19 February 16 13:20 GMT (UK) »
                     This is the story of Hawthorne Street Kings Meadow Road
 
 Thompson the so called writer found one story in 1909 and merited it warranted but a single line   
 
 
AFFAIRS OF EGYPT  1909

By  Thompson

These notes are compiled almost entirely from the large volume  weighing seven pounds of Press cuttings collected by the Society's Honorary Secretary On March 15 some so called Gypsies were evicted from a camping ground in Hawthorne Street, Nottingham
                 

AFFAIRS OF GIPSYS  2016

By Me

Nottingham 1909

After numerous written notices and two and one quarter hours of argument, a body of Gipsies were removed from land in Hawthorne street, Nottingham. belonging, Mr. H. Brown and Messrs. Brothers. For two or three years  this land has been the free habitat of the Bohemians,  the landowners, in co-operation with the city sanitary inspector,  determined to them,   notice of eviction  Mr. Brown's agent, together with two gentlemen from Red Lion-street, two other men' on behalf of Chorley Brothers, and a couple of policemen, at nine o'clock this morning.   Perhaps the order had not been taken seriously, for the encampment had yet made the slightest preparation, and the only horse fetched from the fields was promptly sent away when the police were spotted. There were three caravans, in which some 15 people lived, Billy Bacon, pleaded that his only available horse was lame, and refused to quit. Thereupon the two gentlemen from 
Red Lionstreet, capable looking, stepped to the front
 “The first man who touches my van  I'll lay  out" intimated Billy, the powerful looking fellow  standing over six feet high.  The gentlemen from Red Lion-street consulted, and decided that they could not interfere under the  circumstances. Meanwhile, one of the owners of the other vans said he was quite willing
 "to have a flutter'’  and stand the consequences. 
someone was despatched to negotiate 
 

Nottingham 1900

Charles Bacon, gipsy,  ailing from Shirebrook. was summoned for  aiding and abetting
Fred Wiltshire, Richard Elliott. and John Gregory, in trespassing in search of game, on land belonging the Duke of Portland


Nottingham 1909
                         
                                                 REMARKABLE CASE 

A  story  unfolded in the Nottingham Guildhall  during the hearing a case in which Joseph Thompson,  hawker, Narrow marsh, and Frederick Wiltshire,   horse dealer, living in travelling van standing in Hawthorne street, the Meadows, were charged with stealing a leather bag, containing £23 in gold, from the person of Samuel Potter, general dealer, who resides at 9, Victoria place, Fishergate, on Saturday the 4th.
Mr. R. A. Young, who prosecuted, explained that on the date named Potter met the prisoners in the Nottingham Cattle Market, and bargained with Wiltshire for some time about the purchase of a horse. The deal did not come off, but while it was in progress Potter happened to show them his money,   Afterwards all three adjourned to a public house, and later in the evening met in the Great Market place. They sat drinking for some time, and Wiltshire introduced Potter to  couple of women, the three men set off towards the tramway depot, the two women being some distance behind. On a piece of waste land Wiltshire deliberately took Potter’s purse gold out of his inside pocket. When Potter resisted,  Wiltshire struck him a violent blow under the jaw. knocking him down .
  threats had bean made against the women in the event of giving evidence,  necessary to subpoena. Evidence was then given by the woman referred to Ethel Lakin, 17 Kid street The witness, spoke to seeing the robbery committed. she threatened to give information, and Wiltshire retorted that he would smash a bottle on her head . Wiltshire Offered her £8 to leave the town and let the case fall through, when charged Wiltshire replied that he knew nothing about the £ 23, but Potter was “flashing the money about"  Thompson denied the theft. the identity of the other woman concerned, Castle said he had never been able to  trace her. She was referred to "Birmingham Annie.'' and had reason to believe that she had left the town 


Nottingham 1916
 
                                              FAILURE TO REGISTER

The excuse that he was no scholar was offered by vandweller named William Wiltshire, 39, of Hawthorne Street   


FIGHT AMONGST THE GIPSIES 1918

 
                                             SEQUEL TO A MELEE 

As sequel to regular melee  between bands of  Gipsies who have settled on a waste piece of land in Hawthorne street, Nottingham, George Smith, 57, popularly known as "Gipsy Smith," appeared at the Nottingham Guildhall to day charged with wilfully damaging a caravan, three violins, and other property, value £20. belonging to  basali, a  swarthy looking foreigner who has not yet mastered the english language. Smith was also charged with assaulting Barthelmy Ferret, another van dweller. so far as the charges of assault were concerned permission was asked to withdraw them on the understanding that prisoner compensated prosecutor for damage. Mr. Clayton for Smith facetiously remarked that was a demonstration of Gipsy love, adding that prisoner was not an  evangelist, though born and bred in a tent. (laughter) Smith ordered to pay the £20 to Basali, Prisoner expressed his gratitude to the magistrates

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #194 on: Friday 19 February 16 16:46 GMT (UK) »
 
http://www.nottstalgia.com/images/nottingham_1920s_map.jpg

you can zoom this map up, follow the trent to your left, there is the old Wilford  toll bridge, just above is Hawthorne street leading on to Kings Meadow road, to your left is old Lenton were the Gipsy Isaac Herron says he liked to stay, just below the toll bridge is Wilford, that's were lots of Gipsys are buried
 
http://www.nottshistory.org.uk/resources/maps/Nottingham/nottinghamstreetmapc1960.pdf

scroll down eight pages and see Hawthorne Street and Kings Meadow Road, the land where Gipsys would stay was next to the power station and cliffton colliery

in the photo below you will see the river, to the top middle is the places I talk, this photo is from the twenty's so this is more or less how it was

https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjs_f78x4TLAhUDNxQKHYYPAG4QjRwIBw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.britainfromabove.org.uk%2Fimage%2Fepw021043&psig=AFQjCNHm8XjF24wX40pNVIar6ueQqGmYow&ust=1455996453213373

Robert Mellors, Old Nottingham suburbs: then and now  Wilford 1914
 
NORTH WILFORD

By an Order of the Local Government Board, made in 1894, the parish of Wilford was divided, and that part of the parish to the north of the Trent was directed to be called North Wilford. It will surprise some people to be told how large a portion of Nottingham Meadows was in the original parish, and now forms the new parish named

 The Wilford Meadow was the land west of what we call Wilford Boad, now the Colliery district, and south of "The King's Meadow." In a perambulation of the boundaries of Sherwood Forest in 1505, the officers started from the King's Castell att Nottingham, "and then by the Ould Trentt to the oulde corse of the watter of Leene (which is the bound between the King's medows and the medow of Wilford " etc. B. B., 413.
Between the King's Meadow and Wilford Meadow, it is probable, the boundary was a great dyke. A lithographic view of Nottingham was taken by Henry Burn in 1845, apparently from the northern boundary dyke of Wilford parish, at the junction of King's Meadow and Wilford Roads. It shows the footpath to the ferry, and the dyke, with a tree prominent in the foreground. A copy of this picture appears in "In and about Notts.," page 248.

Crocuses. At the middle of the last century millions of crocuses were growing on both parts of North Wilford meadows, forming a sight of beauty such as no-one who had seen them could ever forget. They are nearly all gone now. Two fields near the Colliery survive, west of Bosworth road Schools. But why mourn over lost flowers?
The places where they grew are occupied with houses, and the houses are full of children, and the children are more beautiful, and of greater value than the flowers.

Colliery. There are in North Wilford two parts necessarily and permanently divided. In the west section the Colliery is the principal feature. When the Pit was sunk, and the Colliery opened out, the business was for several years carried on in the name of Mr. Saul Isaacs as proprietor, until in 1876 the Clifton Colliery Company, Ltd., was formed. It is now the largest employer of labour in the parish, usually having 1,000 workmen and boys,

Schools.
The Bosworth Road Schools were opened in 1886,  suggests that the names of local streets are reminiscent of the end of the Wars of the Roses, and of the Civil War.

                                           
NOTTINGHAM POLICE-COURT 1924
                                           
                                              BRAWL IN A CARAVAN

For considerable time, magistrates at the Nottingham Guildhall to-day were engaged in hearing a case of alleged theft and assault. Thomas Smith, 28, dealer, 71a, Red Lion-street, William Smith. 57. labourer, 2, Essex-street, and George Smith, 59. hawker living in a caravan in Kings Meadow road were charged with stealing  eleven and a quarter yards of linoleum  belonging  William Wiltshire, senr., a caravan dweller,  Kings Meadow road, George Smith was also charged with assaulting William Wiltshire jun, while the later and his Farther were summoned for assaulting George Smith. Mr R.A Young, represented the Wiltshire's, while  Mr A.F Heane appeared for the Smiths.For the prosecution it was alleged that the three men entered the caravan of William Wiltshire Senr. In Kings Meadow road, late on the night of February the 28th and stole a role of linoleum.

George Smith who was alleged armed with an iron bar, afterwards struck William Wiltshire jun, who was injured in the groin.

                                      " ATTACKED WITH A SPADE"

It was admitted George Smith was injured on the head, but it was alleged that he was hit by his own son Tommy by mistake.
For the defence it was contended that George Smith had lent Wiltshire Senr money, and as he had been unable to get some of it back he went to the caravan to get the linoleum.
The Wiltshires, George Smith alleged, attacked him with a spade, the result beying he had to be conveyed to hospital, where two stiches were put into his head,
what happened in the caravan, said Mr Heane, was something akin to a drunken brawl.
The summonses against the Wiltshires was dismissed and the bench considered the assault by George Smith proved, but taking all the circumstances into consideration, they imposed a fine of one pound.The charge of theft against the three Smiths was dismissed.

 

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #195 on: Saturday 20 February 16 13:20 GMT (UK) »
        from when I was young my Mother would tell of the times and people, one such talk was of the hard Smiths, they are related to lots I talk of, we would visit Gipsy George Smith, he had the far away look in his eyes, he sort of looked at everything without those dark eyes being captured, he would stand straight and true, he always had the neck tie of bright colours, a dark looking fellow, we would go round for a cup of tea, He said and my Mother said we was Cousins, what that means in there manner of thought is not for me to guess, i don't claim ever to be related to a soul, they are both gone now to this world, may they both rest, they spoke some old Romany talk, I telled Linda of only one word , do you know she said she only ever heard Boswells say that word, but like I have said you will hear time and again Red Lion Street mentioned, St Anns, Sneinton and the Meadows,  maybe not on the census for the Gipsys was wild and out and about like free birds, but hard Gipsys have passed this way, into the town, do the business, then of round the shires, many   times,   the Smiths round this way were another great Gipsy Family, manys the Legend trod the streets of Nottingham, there story untold,                                     

                       
             
            THE GIPSY'S PROMISE. NOT'TM. MAN IN TROUBLE AGAIN.


Nottingham 1918

Although he had a considerable number of convictions against him, George Smith, 54, horse dealer, of Albion-Street, who was charged at the Nottingham Guildhall to-day with being drunk and disorderly, received lenient treatment on promising to sign the pledge. According to the police the defendant was creating a disturbance at the entrance to the cattle market, and had caused a great crowd to collect. He had previously been fighting and served a sentence of imprisonment, he bought a horse, and because would not  sell it, a man attacked him, and he defended himself. He was arrested. It shall never happen no more, your Honour,  promised Smith, who was only fined 30s. on consenting to sign  the pledge.

 
                                   GIPSY AND THE MOTOR CAR
                             PENALTY FOR USING BAD LANGUAGE
Nottingham 1913

Mr. Dalgleish, of Bobbers Mill, was motoring down Adame-hill yesterday afternoon at the same time as gipsy, named George Smith, of no settled residence, was allowing his horse to rest. For some reason or other Smith used disgusting language concerning motor cars, and Mr. Dalgleish who was accompanied by his wife, proceeded further until he saw Sergeant Clarke and P.c. Mach in whom he drove back in his  car to where the gipsy was. A struggle between the officers and Smith took place, both the former being kicked on the legs and hands, and it was some time before the man could be handcuffed and taken to the police-station. In the process Smith fought like a madman, Smith kept up a running fire of interjections during the hearing. Prisoner was fined 7s. 6d. for the bad language, and sentenced to seven days’ imprisonment for the assault. Smith, shouted from the dock to his wife,
" l want to see you before I go; I have got seven days.”


FLAT IRONS AND POKERS. SEQUEL TO PUBLICHOUSE QUARREL. .NOTTINGHAM                              WOUNDING CHARGE DISMISSED.

Nottingham 1921
 
the Nottingham Guildhall this afternoon, Frederick John Spencer. 26. hawker, 75. Red Lionstreet, and George Jones alias Spencer. 21. hawker, 95, Red Lion-street  were charged  with unlawfully wounding George Smith, with intent to grievous  bodily harm, shooting with a firearm, also with attempting cause grievous bodily harm to Tom Smith. There was a further charge against Frederick John Spencer possesion of loaded revolver and six rounds of ammunition, The Chief Constable said that  at 3.30 p.m. on the 17th George Smith Went to the Crown and Anchor public-house in Sneinton-street, and there he met the two prisoners. Conversation took place and a quarrel arose. One  of the prisoners produced a revolver from his pocket, but put back again. Smith afterwards went home,  saw to his horse, and then went past the house where the two prisoners lived. Evidently they saw him, and then the proceedings commenced. Flat irons, pokers, and large lumps of wood seemed to have been used quite freely. revolver was in the possession of one of the prisoners, a pellet, or bullet entered the cheek of George Smith. "I'LL. BLOW YOUR BRAINS OUT." He was known as '"' Gipsy Smith," being a gipsy bred and born.


                                    NOT THE EVANGELIST 
                                         "GIPSY SMITH”
                           BEFORE THE NOTTM  MAGISTRATES 

Nottingham 1920

Alleging that George Smith, hawker. Red Lionstreet, threatened her husband  then her and her children Margaret Wheat, married woman. 23, Lomas-yard, Bellar gate, brought proceedings against Smith for threats, and for using abusive language. In her evidence complainant said defendant  added it is only a month since he leathered my husband.  She was afraid of him. For defendant, Mr. H. B. Clayton said Smith was locally known as Gipsy Smith.  The Chairman Mr. W. Hunt, said  I think  he is pretty well known. Mr. Clayton: He is not the evangelist, although he dwells in a van.  he his a man of very excitable nature.   The magistrates said they would give Smith the benefit of the doubt, and warning him to- behave himself in the future, dismissed the case.

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #196 on: Saturday 20 February 16 14:54 GMT (UK) »
 
                                              MAULED BY GIPSIES.
CONSTABLE'S ENCOUNTER NEAR LENTON. PRISON FOR TWO "VERY LOW BLACKGUARDS."

Nottingham 1918

exciting the road near Lenton Abbey, led to the  appearance in the Nottingham  police court to-day of George Smith, 57, gipsy, who had a total of  £130 in his  pockets,  charged cruelty to a horse and assaulting P.c. John  and damaging his bicycle to the extent £10 Albert Smith, a son, aged 23, and two young  women Maria  Elliot and Amy Webster, both  Gipsys were also  charged with assault.    Johnson, a member 1   bounty Force. who was riding a bike  spoke to  the elder Smith about  thrashing a horse, Smith thrashed him with  the whipstock, while the younger Smith and one of the women threw bricks at him. Not content with this, all four burled stones at the wheels of the bicycle. Smith, sen., leading off jumping on the wheel twice. Although the constable followed the quartets to Nottingham, where Sergeant Marriott arrested the prisoner for being drunk and ill-treating the horse.  Prisoner  denied the assault and damage. The two Smiths, however,  were described by the Chief Constable as "very Low Blackguards," were each sentenced to two months  imprisonment, for the assault, the father in addition being fined 20s. for drunkenness, £5 for cruelty, and £6 for the damage.                 

          MAULED BY GIPSIES, ANOTHER WARRANT AGAINST SMITH. 

Nottingham 1918

 further warrant for assault granted to the Nottingham magistrates to day against George Smith the Gipsy who was yesterday sentenced to two months' hard labour for assault in a matter near Lenton Abbey. The application for the warrant was made by two dark skinned Belgians, who appeared in court with their heads bandaged, Bench ordered a  warrant to be served on the completion of Smith's sentence.                                           

                                            THE GIPSY'S VISIT.

                          MUCH DAMAGE CAUSED AT A LEEN SIDE HOME.

Nottingham 1919

Gipsy's visit to 12, Lees-yard, where  he assaulted Rose Hannah Merrick and destroyed property the value of £l5. led to the appearance of George Smith at the Court to-day, where was ordered to pay damages and costs, Smith who is a general dealer, and  resides in Sussex-street, Broad-marsh, visited her house. He forced his way in and assaulted her by striking her in the mouth, after which seized several bunch-s artificial  Flowers  which she was making and threw them on to the fire. also destroyed expensive china vases and pictures.  complainant admitted that defendant had once loaned her money, but deigned she asked him to call at her home to repay him, he acted  like a mad bull and wrecked practically everything in the house.


                             A DERBY DISTURBANCE. NOTTM.
                           HAWKER HIS WEALTHY SONS-IN-LAW.
 
Nottingham 1919

A  melee in the Derby Cattle Market on Friday, in which prisoner was rescued from custody and a constable had to make use of his staff, had a sequel at the police-court to-day. Joseph Wiltshire, hawker, 6, Gedling-street, Nottingham, was fined 10s.  assaulting Pc. Bristow, and for assaulting Special Constable H. A. Wallace (market  superintendent), whom he struck several times on the face and body; while Alfred Smith, dealer,  living in a van at Cotton-lane, was fined 7s. 6d. for fighting. Bristow apprehended Smith and his antagonist, whereupon Wiltshire (the father-in-law of the men) and others intervened and succeeded in getting one of the prisoners away. Wiltshire then ran off, but was stopped by Mr. Wallace who told the Bench that Wiltshire made a mad struggle for freedom. Wiltshire, against whom there were eight previous convictions. including one for police assault, stated that  his sons-in-law had a lot of money in their possession and was afraid they would be robbed.


 

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Re: Gipsy Dan Boswell
« Reply #197 on: Sunday 21 February 16 13:37 GMT (UK) »
 

                                                               COUNTY OFFICE
                                                           A Gipsy Named Smith
Leicester  1837                                     

 Was charged with breaking a window at the Crown and Magpie beer_bouse,  because the landlady refused to furnish him with spirits, for the very sufficient reason that she had none on the premises. A policeman joked to the violence of the prisoner's conduct, and the Mayor asked him if he had any ques- tions to put to the witness. Prisoner (surveying the policeman): Really I don't know — is this the man as took me? (Loud laughter.) I was so tossicated in liquor at the time, I don't recollect him ; and I'm sure i didn't know I was at the Crown and Magpie — l thought I was at the Waggon and Horses. (Laughter.) The Mayor : I have to congratulate you, Sir, on the great improvement in your appearauce since I first saw you— you were then as dirty and as wretched a looking object as could possibly be, but the gaol has altered you for the better. Prisoner: I was always likely to look lost and dirty, when the Police pulled me about so. The Mayor : Did the Police pull that long beard into existence which you wore when you first made your appearance ? (Laughter.) The prisoner admitted that the Police were not answer- able for his beard, and, in reply to the Bench, said, that he lived in the lanes with his wife in the warm weather, but was not a gipsy altogether : he had led a wandering life from his birth, like his father before him. The landlady stated that the gipsy's friends had re- paired the window, and the Magistrates then said that the prisoner had rendered himself liable to a fine of £5 but they would mitigate it to 5 s. and the costs, or, in default, seven — " I'll pay the fine for him, your honour," exclaimed a gruff voice from the body of the room. The Mayor: You're so prompt, that you make us almost regret we did not inflict the whole penalty— l don't doubt but you would have paid the £5 for your friend as cheerfully as the 5 s. (Laughter.)