Author Topic: 1939 Register update codes - Nr230 what does it mean? Name change by deed poll?  (Read 4861 times)

Offline ChristopheN

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Looking at a woman in the 1939 Register - they have been updated on 6.3.1950 with a name change
The entry is coded NR 230 DBD (possibly 250). DBD is Billericay
Other entries with name change by marriage do not have NR 230 but have a M instead
I can find no marriage for this person to account for the name change

Interestingly higher up the same page Mr and Mrs Weinberg have both their names changed to Wayne and they are coded NR 230

Can anyone confirm NR 230 is name change by deed poll?

Offline stanmapstone

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Re: 1939 Register update codes - Nr230 what does it mean? Name change by deed poll?
« Reply #1 on: Thursday 07 January 16 21:19 GMT (UK) »
Interestingly higher up the same page Mr and Mrs Weinberg both their name changed to Wayne and they are coded NR 230
Can anyone conform NR 230 is name change by deed poll?
Welcome to RootsChat
From 1914, all deeds poll enrolled in the Supreme Court had first to be advertised in the London Gazette.
There is a Deed Poll notice in The London Gazette 12 August 1941 Issue:  35244 Page: 4692 by Solomon Weinberg that he was changing his name to Stanley Wayne.
https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/35244/page/4692

Stan
Mapstone, Mapston.
Census Information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline stanmapstone

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Re: 1939 Register update codes - Nr230 what does it mean? Name change by deed poll?
« Reply #2 on: Thursday 07 January 16 21:29 GMT (UK) »
Looking at a woman in the 1939 Register - they have been updated on 6.3.1950 with a name change
The entry is coded NR 230 DBD (possibly 250). DBD is Billericay

You could try searching for her in the London Gazette. https://www.thegazette.co.uk/

Stan
Mapstone, Mapston.
Census Information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk


Offline ChristopheN

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Re: 1939 Register update codes - Nr230 what does it mean? Name change by deed poll?
« Reply #3 on: Thursday 07 January 16 21:47 GMT (UK) »
Really helpful - thanks

I managed to look up Hyman Weinberg who changed his name to Wynne on 31.8.1945
1939 Register entered it as Wayne - the entry was dated 1947 so that answers the other question, there is often a delay of several years before the Register is updated - it is not the date of the event

https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/37247/page/4402

Offline ChristopheN

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Re: 1939 Register update codes - Nr230 what does it mean? Name change by deed poll?
« Reply #4 on: Sunday 10 January 16 10:04 GMT (UK) »
Dear Stan
I still have not nailed this down
The person Lily Staff (nee Timcke) changed to Lilian Wilkinson
The entry is dated 1950 with a Billericay code and NR230

I still think this is deed poll
I cant find a London Gazette entry
Perhaps the Gazette did not bother with women?

Thanks again, you got me on the way with Weinberg

Offline helvissa

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Hello,

At the risk of annoying everyone by commenting on an older thread...

This might answer a mystery regarding someone in my family. I was told she had married "Uncle Fred" (Frederick Victor Smith) but I've never been able to find their marriage in the BMD indexes (I looked on several sites!). Although his name isn't that unusual, his wife was called Doris Lily Nunn, but I just can't find the record.

When the 1939 Register was released, I saw that beside her name is says NR230 DBZ, and 30/12/49, with her name changed from NUNN, Doris L to SMITH, Doris Lily. So I thought maybe the marriage had taken place but there's an error in the indexes which is making it impossible to find. [DBZ, I have just discovered thanks to this link: https://www.findmypast.co.uk/articles/1939-register-enumeration-districts is Harwich, not Southend, which is where Doris was living when the register was taken, nor is Harwich in Suffolk, where Doris eventually lived, though of course it's not far from Suffolk at all]

I know they met in the guesthouse that Doris' mother ran when Fred stayed there during or just after the war. Fred had been in both the Navy and the Army, and I've got his Army log book - this gave me his date of birth, which was fortunate as I could then find him on the 1939 Register and other records.

I found him on the 1939 Register with another woman and two closed records. One of the records has recently been opened, and it turns out this is for a daughter who was born in 1921 (so might've been opened by someone doing their family tree!). I can see around the black strip for the last closed record and (having checked other records) it's for another daughter.

So I found out that Fred was married before he "married" Doris, and as I can't find a marriage entry for Fred and Doris, I assume that Fred's first wife was still alive and that they'd separated without divorcing. Based on what's in this thread, then I'm assuming (until any other evidence turns up!) that Doris changed her surname to Fred's without them actually marrying - and NR230 is referring to a change of name that didn't come about by marriage.

I can't see her in the London Gazette, though!

Offline ChristopheN

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My further thoughts on this are as follows and they are only opinions:-
The 1939 Register was only intended as a register of the population (not in the armed forces) at the end of September 1939
It was updated with information from marriages and deaths for how long and how accurately I do not know
A major later function was to provide a reference for NHS registration for the new GP services introduced from 1948 onwards
Amendments were generated by the population registering with GPs
Searching on Google for Nr230 suggests that the National Archives produced a circular with this reference in 1946 which will not be publicised until 2021
Nr230 entries appear to refer to name changes without marriage, some are supported by Gazette entries, but most are not
They are overwhelmingly individuals changing from foreign sounding to British names and this was probably allowed without question under the provision of this circular Nr230
There would have been many
Others who claimed to have a changed name at NHS registration may have just been coded Nr230 to avoid complicated investigation
The name Nunn in the previous post could have slipped through

Just my ideas





Online Rena

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I started reading newspapers in the 1950s and occasionally would see notification that a name change had taken place.  I also noticed that when a company was in trouble the event was placed in a private notification in the local newspaper - however, I thought it a bit sneaky that my local newspaper wasn't the town where the company was registered.  Quite often there'd be an entry by a husband to say he wasn't responsible for any debts incurred by his Mrs. Perhaps you might find the deed poll name change in the local newspaper, or perhaps it could be in a neighbouring town's newspaper which would be a means of hiding the fact that the couple hadn't eloped and married.

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Offline helvissa

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That's a good idea - just had a look though and no joy!

I've just emailed a family member to ask if they remember a Harwich connection. And I just looked through an archive box of photos etc that I've picked out from the main "family archive" (massive, confused bundle in the garage is more accurate!) and found a drawing of Harwich which looks like it was once the front of a greetings card. I have to wonder if maybe Doris pretended to elope and sent a card of Harwich to her family to say "Guess what, guys? We're married!"

But actually weren't....

(a massive guess, I know... who knows how that picture of Harwich ended up in the collection, and why it was kept? Could be anything, but...)