Author Topic: Why would a family not be on the 1939 census if known to be alive?  (Read 3290 times)

Offline thebottos

  • RootsChat Extra
  • **
  • Posts: 26
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Why would a family not be on the 1939 census if known to be alive?
« on: Wednesday 06 April 16 16:05 BST (UK) »
Hi I am looking for relatives that were known to be living in the Durham area, The Lumsden family, consisting of husband, wife and daughter Jean. We know where they were in 1911 but by 1939 there is no trace of them. We know they were still alive and not known to have moved abroad. Can anyone help with how we might trace them. Ralph Lumsden was a coal miner but could have been called up to the army?

Offline StanleysChesterton

  • RootsChat Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 711
  • My G-grandmother on right, 1955
    • View Profile
Re: why would a family not be on the 1939 cencus if wknown to be alive?
« Reply #1 on: Wednesday 06 April 16 16:11 BST (UK) »
Hi I am looking for relatives that were known to be living in the Durham area, The Lumsden family, consisting of husband, wife and daughter Jean. We know where they were in 1911 but by 1939 there is no trace of them. We know they were still alive and not known to have moved abroad. Can anyone help with how we might trace them. Ralph Lumsden was a coal miner but could have been called up to the army?
Like all record sources, it could be that their record has been mistranscribed, or even that they were away that week/month for a variety of reasons, so they aren't where you expect.

I have a few "missing" that I know must be in there.
Related to: Lots of people!
:)
Mostly Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire, some Kent and Dorset.
 
Elizabeth Long/Elizabeth Wilson/Elizabeth Long Wilson, b 1889 Caxton - where are you?
- -
Seeking: death year/location of Albert Edward Morgan, born Cambridge 1885/86 to Hannah & Edward Morgan of 33 Cambridge Place.
WW1 soldier, service number 8624, 2nd battalion, Highland Light Infantry.

Offline rosie99

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 41,843
  • ALFIE 2009 - 2021 (Rosbercon Sky's the Limit)
    • View Profile
Re: Why would a family not be on the 1939 census if known to be alive?
« Reply #2 on: Wednesday 06 April 16 16:21 BST (UK) »
Have you tried searching by first name & birth date.  :-\   

Are any of them still alive. If Ralph was in the Army at the time the register was compiled he would not be on it.
Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline BumbleB

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 14,242
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Why would a family not be on the 1939 census if known to be alive?
« Reply #3 on: Wednesday 06 April 16 16:26 BST (UK) »
If it is Ralph, born 1884, then he would be too old to be called up!!!

Transcriptions and NBI are merely finding aids.  They are NOT a substitute for original record entries.
Remember - "They'll be found when they want to be found" !!!
If you don't ask the question, you won't get an answer.
He/she who never made a mistake, never made anything.
Archbell - anywhere, any date
Kendall - WRY
Milner - WRY
Appleyard - WRY


Offline Sc00p

  • RootsChat Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 166
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Why would a family not be on the 1939 census if known to be alive?
« Reply #4 on: Wednesday 06 April 16 17:20 BST (UK) »
If it is Ralph, born 1884, then he would be too old to be called up!!!

Being born c1884 would not make him too old to be called up.  He may have been exempted though if he worked 'underground'.

Offline BumbleB

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 14,242
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Why would a family not be on the 1939 census if known to be alive?
« Reply #5 on: Wednesday 06 April 16 17:27 BST (UK) »
He'd be 55 in 1939!! 
Transcriptions and NBI are merely finding aids.  They are NOT a substitute for original record entries.
Remember - "They'll be found when they want to be found" !!!
If you don't ask the question, you won't get an answer.
He/she who never made a mistake, never made anything.
Archbell - anywhere, any date
Kendall - WRY
Milner - WRY
Appleyard - WRY

Offline groom

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 21,144
  • Me aged 3. Tidied up thanks to Wiggy.
    • View Profile
Re: Why would a family not be on the 1939 census if known to be alive?
« Reply #6 on: Wednesday 06 April 16 17:38 BST (UK) »
If it is Ralph, born 1884, then he would be too old to be called up!!!

Being born c1884 would not make him too old to be called up.  He may have been exempted though if he worked 'underground'.

Far too old, by 1942 conscription had gone up to men aged 51, he'd be 58 by then.
Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline BumbleB

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 14,242
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Why would a family not be on the 1939 census if known to be alive?
« Reply #7 on: Wednesday 06 April 16 17:41 BST (UK) »
If I've got the right Ralph Lumsden, then he was an underground worker, even in 1939 - Colliery Horseman below ground.

Transcriptions and NBI are merely finding aids.  They are NOT a substitute for original record entries.
Remember - "They'll be found when they want to be found" !!!
If you don't ask the question, you won't get an answer.
He/she who never made a mistake, never made anything.
Archbell - anywhere, any date
Kendall - WRY
Milner - WRY
Appleyard - WRY

Offline ScouseBoy

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 6,142
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Why would a family not be on the 1939 census if known to be alive?
« Reply #8 on: Wednesday 06 April 16 17:58 BST (UK) »
If it is Ralph, born 1884, then he would be too old to be called up!!!

Being born c1884 would not make him too old to be called up.  He may have been exempted though if he worked 'underground'.

Far too old, by 1942 conscription had gone up to men aged 51, he'd be 58 by then.
  Maybe too old  to be called up for Active Service in the Army.  But  not too old for the Merchant Navy.  Not old  to be directed to specific work if he had specific skills.     
Nursall   ~    Buckinghamshire
Avies ~   Norwich