Author Topic: Ordnance Survey maps  (Read 2311 times)

Offline Gone.

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Ordnance Survey maps
« on: Saturday 09 July 16 20:46 BST (UK) »
Hello All

Something I've being meaning to ask for ages:

If I take an OS map, e.g Dukinfield 1898 second edition  - the information on the map says surveyed in 1891-2 and revised in 1896. What exactly does 'revised' mean? What would have been revised?

How different is a revision from a re-survey? E.g Ashton map of 1907 was surveyed in 1849, re-surveyed in 1892 and revised in 1907.

Thanks!


Offline tomkin

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Re: Ordnance Survey maps
« Reply #1 on: Saturday 09 July 16 21:45 BST (UK) »
  It means what it says. You first draw a map and then at regular intervals

    you check new constructions such as railways and buildings and put these on

    on your map and delete items that have disappeared.

        Better explanation is:-

          http://maps.nls.uk/os/6inch-england-and-wales/info1.html

Offline stanmapstone

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Re: Ordnance Survey maps
« Reply #2 on: Saturday 09 July 16 22:22 BST (UK) »
A re-survey means just that. The orignal survey of 1849 was not considered accurate enough, for some reason, and a re-survey was required.

Stan
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Offline Gone.

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Re: Ordnance Survey maps
« Reply #3 on: Saturday 09 July 16 22:47 BST (UK) »
Thanks for the replies. What I was trying to work out is what is the difference between a re-survey and a revision, since a revision would entail some kind of re-survey to make the revision possible.  The link provided above mentions in the 1930s and 40s that selected change was regarded as a revision. That is fine for a definition of a revision for those decades. Whether it applies to earlier decades, I don't yet know as I haven't read all of the link - all in due course.

I have to reply to the first comment about it means what it says. I know that. What I am interested in is the precise meaning of what it says. If I can date certain maps accurately (leaving aside publication dates), which entails having precise definitions of terminology for the particular historical period in question, then that helps me with aspects of my family research.

Thanks again to all anyway. Onwards and upwards.


Online KGarrad

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Re: Ordnance Survey maps
« Reply #4 on: Sunday 10 July 16 07:27 BST (UK) »
Information re Revisions here:
https://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/about/governance/policies/os-mastermap-revision.html

In the History of the OS, (https://www.charlesclosesociety.org/files/HistoryOSGB.pdf)it says:

In 1820 Captain Thomas Colby (1784-1852) was put in charge of the Survey, and almost immediately he was confronted with evidence from several sources that OS work was not of the best standard. As a result, between 1821 and 1834 almost all OS field work in Great Britain consisted of revising existing surveys
Garrad (Suffolk, Essex, Somerset), Crocker (Somerset), Vanstone (Devon, Jersey), Sims (Wiltshire), Bridger (Kent)

Offline stanmapstone

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Re: Ordnance Survey maps
« Reply #5 on: Sunday 10 July 16 08:44 BST (UK) »
You need to understand the history of the Ordnance Survey. Initialy the country was surveyed at 1 inch to the mile, then at 6 inches to the mile. It was then decided in 1853 that  all cultivated areas should be surveyed at 1/2500, and this survey started in 1858 and was completed in 1890. By 1898 the few counties surveyed at the six-inch scale had also been brought up to the 1/2500 scale. The revision of the 1/2500 plans was approved in 1882, the intention being to undertake periodical revision every twenty years. The first revision was begun in 1891 and completed in 1914. The second revision was begun in 1904 but was never completed. From 1928 because of reduction of staff priority of revision was given to those areas in which most change had taken place.
The revisions of the six inch maps were derived from the 1/2500 revisions.

Stan
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Offline stanmapstone

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Re: Ordnance Survey maps
« Reply #6 on: Sunday 10 July 16 09:48 BST (UK) »
If you really want to know the dates of the various revisions for the whole country you need to get a copy of "Ordnance Survey Maps, a concise guide for Historians" by Richard Oliver. This lists all the maps produced by the Ordnance Survey with scales and the dates of revisions. For example Manchester: County Series Survey 1844-9, 1st revision 1888-9, 2nd revision 1904-5 and 1915-18, 3rd revision 1930-3, National Grid Survey 1948-9.
The book also has a chapter on the development of the Ordnance Survey.

Stan
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Offline Gone.

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Re: Ordnance Survey maps
« Reply #7 on: Sunday 10 July 16 11:57 BST (UK) »
Thanks to the latest posters for the additional information and links. Plenty for me to get on with on a wet afternoon in my part of the country!

I appreciate the time that everyone has taken in finding and posting the information to help me on my way.

Regards.

Offline stanmapstone

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Re: Ordnance Survey maps
« Reply #8 on: Sunday 10 July 16 14:16 BST (UK) »
In the History of the OS, (https://www.charlesclosesociety.org/files/HistoryOSGB.pdf)it says:

In 1820 Captain Thomas Colby (1784-1852) was put in charge of the Survey, and almost immediately he was confronted with evidence from several sources that OS work was not of the best standard. As a result, between 1821 and 1834 almost all OS field work in Great Britain consisted of revising existing surveys

That refers to the field work for the Old Series one-inch maps, and not to the later 6 inch and 1/2500 maps. By 1844 publication of the Old Series one-inch was complete for the whole of Britain south of a line from Preston to Hull.

Stan
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