Author Topic: nurseryman  (Read 1366 times)

Offline Gwen in gozo

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nurseryman
« on: Tuesday 28 February 17 22:00 GMT (UK) »
1909 found a relative who owned their own business and called themselves a nurseryman or nurseryguard
He left a sum of 200 pound to his son on death. His wife carried on the business as well.
Any idea what a nurseryman was (something to do with farming?) and would he be classed as a successful business man in those days? 
thanks

Offline Radcliff

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Re: nurseryman
« Reply #1 on: Tuesday 28 February 17 23:05 GMT (UK) »
A little more information about him might be useful
where did he live for instance
definition of a Nurseryman was someone who planted tree's
but without further information hard to say for your person
Gunning County Down,Kneale Isle of Man,Riddle Tynemouth,Bibby Kendal/Bradford,Colenso Penzance/Barrow-in-Furness,Steele Corney Fell,Chapman Ely,Dawes Alfreton,Blamire Westmoreland and Ulverston
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Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: nurseryman
« Reply #2 on: Wednesday 01 March 17 01:12 GMT (UK) »
A nurseryman was someone whose business was raising plants. A nursery besides being children's quarters is a rearing place for plants. Nurseries pre-dated garden centres. Some still exist. Flower shows are a good place to meet nursery(wo)men.
Nurseries vary in size. Smaller operate from owner's garden/ farm /land, selling plants on-site, or at a street / market stall, flower shows or by mail order. Larger may be size of a garden centre. Emphasis is on plants & related material . Plants may be grown from seeds, cuttings etc. on-site, or bought as very young plants and grown on.
As to how successful your man was, you'd have to do more research on him.
Cowban

Offline Ruskie

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Re: nurseryman
« Reply #3 on: Wednesday 01 March 17 04:53 GMT (UK) »
Nurseryman is a fairly broad term - I would agree with Maiden Stone's explanation.

What is his occupation in the censuses? Sometimes you can be given a little more detail, for example it sometimes tells you how many employees someone has, which can indicate the size of a business.  :)


Offline chempat

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Re: nurseryman
« Reply #4 on: Wednesday 01 March 17 06:44 GMT (UK) »
You have said he was a nursery man in 1909, but not when he died.  As he could have died from 1909 to 1989, or whatever, the value of that money varies a lot.

There are lots of different websites and reports to give you indications on wages. Many people lived from week to week  and would have nothing to leave to their children and no wills.  So depends on your idea of success.

For a very basic approximation, average weekly agricultural workers earnings were 75p in 1910 as from 'British Labour Statistics: Historical Abstract 1886-1968 (Department of Employment and Productivity, 1971'.

Offline Gwen in gozo

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Re: nurseryman
« Reply #5 on: Wednesday 01 March 17 07:46 GMT (UK) »
Hi thanks for all the replys.
His name was David Sharpe born 1842 in Newark died 1909 leaving 200 pound to his son. he live in Balderton All there is on the census is nurseryman and his son was an assistant nurseryman. After he died his wife also called herself a nurseryman It seemed to have the sense it was a family business.
thankyou
Gwen

Offline aghadowey

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Re: nurseryman
« Reply #6 on: Wednesday 01 March 17 08:50 GMT (UK) »
I'm wondering if you've just found the probate extract rather than read the actual Will?
1918 SHARP David of Barnby-road Balderton Nottinghamshire died 19 July 1909 Administration (with Will) Nottingham 2 July to Walter Henry Sharp nurseryman. effects 199 17s 6d.
https://probatesearch.service.gov.uk/#wills

If you have only seen the above extract in probate listings- son Walter was granted permission to administer the estate according to law but this doesn't mean that he was the sole beneficiary.
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Offline Gwen in gozo

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Re: nurseryman
« Reply #7 on: Wednesday 01 March 17 09:09 GMT (UK) »
yes that's what I have seen So I need to look for an actual will somewhere?

Offline aghadowey

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Re: nurseryman
« Reply #8 on: Wednesday 01 March 17 09:16 GMT (UK) »
I posted the link to probate site above  ;)

I suspect there might be a difference in value of between 1909 (when he died) and 1918 (when administration was granted).
Using this calculator 1 in 1909 was worth 110 but in 1918 1 was worth 63
http://inflation.stephenmorley.org/
Away sorting out DNA matches... I may be gone for some time many years!