Author Topic: welsh equivalent of Newhouse  (Read 2355 times)

Offline MiniHistory

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welsh equivalent of Newhouse
« on: Sunday 11 March 18 22:48 GMT (UK) »
Is there a Welsh surname which translates as Newhouse?

Offline Gadget

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Re: welsh equivalent of Newhouse
« Reply #1 on: Sunday 11 March 18 22:49 GMT (UK) »
Ty newydd is the only one that I can think of at the moment - not a surname though.

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Offline Gadget

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Re: welsh equivalent of Newhouse
« Reply #2 on: Sunday 11 March 18 22:53 GMT (UK) »
Could you give some clues as to why Newhouse would be a surname?
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Offline Gadget

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Re: welsh equivalent of Newhouse
« Reply #3 on: Sunday 11 March 18 23:02 GMT (UK) »
Welsh surnames are relatively recent.

It was more usual to use a patronymic form with an ap/ab or ferch/merch (son of/daughter of) before the name of the father - i.e.<given name> ap efan/evan, etc.  This form continued well into the 18th century and in some areas into the 19th, when the Englsih form of surname was adopted.  The remnants of the patronymic form can be seen in Bowen and Pugh, for example, from ap owen and ap hugh/huw.

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Offline MiniHistory

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Re: welsh equivalent of Newhouse
« Reply #4 on: Sunday 11 March 18 23:30 GMT (UK) »
Hi, Gadget, and thank you. I was attempting to justify why someone with a Welsh first name (Geraint) and an English surname (Newhouse) might have come from New Zealand to Australia in the late 19th century. I thought perhaps they might have anglicised their surname somewhere along the line. I think it's more likely that the first name came from, say, a mother with Welsh ancestry and that the person himself was born in New Zealand.

Offline pinot

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Re: welsh equivalent of Newhouse
« Reply #5 on: Monday 12 March 18 00:26 GMT (UK) »
I don't think that a Welsh surname, translated, would end up as 'Newhouse'. It might conceivably arise from a Welshman being named as 'John etc Tŷ Newydd', common as a form of Welsh nickname, but seems unlikely to be have been used for official purposes.

Offline MiniHistory

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Re: welsh equivalent of Newhouse
« Reply #6 on: Wednesday 17 July 19 00:43 BST (UK) »
I don't think that a Welsh surname, translated, would end up as 'Newhouse'. It might conceivably arise from a Welshman being named as 'John etc Tŷ Newydd', common as a form of Welsh nickname, but seems unlikely to be have been used for official purposes.
Thank, Pinot. I worked around the problem eventually.

Offline DavidFliesTesco

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Re: welsh equivalent of Newhouse
« Reply #7 on: Wednesday 04 December 19 16:01 GMT (UK) »
Another possibiltiy is that the Newhouses moved first to Wales and then they, or a descendant, emigrated having assimilated, possibly even speaking Welsh but certainly using Welsh given names.

This would be quite common, e.g., lots of south-west England agricultural labourers moved to Wales in the 1850s-70s in my own family, and another tree I have created has the Parker family, originally from Somerset, in Neath in the 1700s.

Offline MiniHistory

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Re: welsh equivalent of Newhouse
« Reply #8 on: Thursday 09 January 20 22:18 GMT (UK) »
Another possibiltiy is that the Newhouses moved first to Wales and then they, or a descendant, emigrated having assimilated, possibly even speaking Welsh but certainly using Welsh given names.

More food for thought. Thank you.