Author Topic: The term Moor  (Read 1112 times)

Offline stanmapstone

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Re: The term Moor
« Reply #9 on: Thursday 26 April 18 14:37 BST (UK) »
In the 1881 census for Cornwall there are numerous entries where the "Road, Street, etc., and number or name of House" is given as ****** Moor

Stan
Mapstone, Mapston.
Census Information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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Offline Stormô

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Re: The term Moor
« Reply #10 on: Thursday 26 April 18 15:17 BST (UK) »
In the 1881 census for Cornwall there are numerous entries where the "Road, Street, etc., and number or name of House" is given as ****** Moor

Stan

Stan you're a star. I did wonder but because I've never had this on a census before I wanted to be sure. 

Since then I've located it on the 1841 census and several others lol. The terms that have been used to describe it have been


Last house along lane.
Name Croft
Name Moor
Na me Gate.

All valid given its location and so again thank you very much.

So it's 40 years older than I thought and may well be older.

If only there were another way to get further back.

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Offline ShaunJ

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Re: The term Moor
« Reply #11 on: Thursday 26 April 18 15:38 BST (UK) »
Quote
If only there were another way to get further back.

Do you have access to the deeds of the property you are interested in? They should record the history.

Are there copyholder records for the area?
UK Census info. Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Online Maiden Stone

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Re: The term Moor
« Reply #12 on: Thursday 26 April 18 23:16 BST (UK) »
Have you searched tithe records? Accompanying maps are detailed, showing every field.
Possibly leases.
Each census enumerator filled in a page recording numbers of people not in houses i.e. outhouse, tents etc.

Offline Stormô

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Re: The term Moor
« Reply #13 on: Friday 27 April 18 08:33 BST (UK) »
Have you searched tithe records? Accompanying maps are detailed, showing every field.
Possibly leases.
Each census enumerator filled in a page recording numbers of people not in houses i.e. outhouse, tents etc.

I havent I am afraid ..... I have heard of tithe maps but thats as far as I knew. How do you get hold of tithe maps for the area you are researching. I have ancestry .... but I have a feeling you are going to say records office locally held lol.

Offline alpinecottage

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Re: The term Moor
« Reply #14 on: Friday 27 April 18 08:59 BST (UK) »
The Genealogist (subscription website) has all the English and Welsh tithe maps online.
Otherwise, the county record office will have them - phone to check they are open/accessible/don't have to be ordered in advance etc.
Also Old maps can be viewed via various websites, some free of charge eg https://maps.nls.uk/os/6inch-england-and-wales/  and also use google for specific areas since you don't want to say where you're interested in.
Also try Genuki for the area of interest (use Google)
Perrins - Manchester and Staffs
Honan - Manchester and Ireland
Hogg - Manchester 19 cent
Anderson - Newcastle mid 19 cent
Boullen - London then Carlisle then Manchester
Comer - Manchester and Galway

Offline Stormô

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Re: The term Moor
« Reply #15 on: Friday 27 April 18 10:44 BST (UK) »
The Genealogist (subscription website) has all the English and Welsh tithe maps online.
Otherwise, the county record office will have them - phone to check they are open/accessible/don't have to be ordered in advance etc.
Also Old maps can be viewed via various websites, some free of charge eg https://maps.nls.uk/os/6inch-england-and-wales/  and also use google for specific areas since you don't want to say where you're interested in.
Also try Genuki for the area of interest (use Google)

Thank you. Actually after the previous post I did have a quick look online and as suspected they are digitising some of them but the vast majority are held at the records office. Its appointment only and you have to book quite a way in advance. So that had to go one the back burner for the time being. Walked away from laptop to make a coffee and then I froze .....

.... The area wasnt Cornwall back then it was Devon! Tried again online and Devon have them all located online and for free .... the term moor is used to name various fields ..... but the property I am interested in isnt on those and has its own name. Which is brilliant because it gives me a name to trace to see how the field got its name. But as the property is in that field and the people living at the "moor" have their own field I have to see where they were living. Cant wait.

Conclusion so far is that the house did'nt exist in 1841 ... it may have existed in 1851 oinwards.


Thank you guys all so much this has been a very very useful if steep learning curve. Take Care.