Author Topic: Bury/Edenfield Areas  (Read 1130 times)

Online Maiden Stone

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Re: Bury/Edenfield Areas
« Reply #9 on: Monday 06 August 18 17:08 BST (UK) »
Nuttall was site of a factory + workers houses + a hall. Now Nuttall Park, Ramsbottom ( Holder of a Green Flag award and Finalist in Best British Park 2 years ago.  :))
 I downloaded a photo of ruined mill and cottages sometime ago. I'll see if I can locate it.
Holcombe was a much larger parish than it is now as the original chapel predated most others in the area. Holcombe residents married at Bury Parish church until mid 19thC.

I think Edenfield was a chapel-of-ease until 19thC.

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Offline heywood

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Re: Bury/Edenfield Areas
« Reply #10 on: Monday 06 August 18 17:12 BST (UK) »
That sounds very favourable and looks like the place I mentioned on 1893 map. :)
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Offline heywood

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Re: Bury/Edenfield Areas
« Reply #11 on: Monday 06 August 18 17:15 BST (UK) »
Is this it, Maiden Stone?

http://www.rootschat.com/links/01mgw/
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Re: Bury/Edenfield Areas
« Reply #12 on: Monday 06 August 18 17:36 BST (UK) »
According to the Victoria County History of Lancashire, Nuttall and Nuttall Lane were 2 hamlets.
The Victoria County Histories are digitised as " British History Online". See: Townships: Tottington: Tottington Lower End. The Manor and Township of Tottington consisted of 2 parts, Tottington Lower End and Tottington Higher End. Holcombe, Holcombe Brook, Brooksbottom,  Nuttall, Nuttall Lane and Ramsbottom were all in Tottington Lower End.

https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/lancs/vol5/pp143-150

An early census, possibly 1841 or 1851 has Nuttall or Nuttall Lane at top of page as township or village. I've found people residing in Nuttall at that time. It was a thriving place then. Tranquil now, except when steam trains chug through at weekends. One occasionally stumbles across industrial remains in the wooded area of Nuttall Park.

Online Maiden Stone

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Re: Bury/Edenfield Areas
« Reply #13 on: Monday 06 August 18 17:45 BST (UK) »
Is this it, Maiden Stone?

http://www.rootschat.com/links/01mgw/

Yes that's the picture. I can't see a date. Someone maybe able to date it from clothing of inhabitants.
Only building now is the Hall, long since converted into cottages. There used to be a solitary cottage beside a bridge  but I don't know if it's standing yet.                             

Offline heywood

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Re: Bury/Edenfield Areas
« Reply #14 on: Monday 06 August 18 17:47 BST (UK) »
Thatís very helpful MS.
I am sure Eric will be delighted.
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Re: Bury/Edenfield Areas
« Reply #15 on: Monday 06 August 18 18:27 BST (UK) »
A book "Always Turn the Page - The Robinson story 1600-2000" which is a family history  by David Robinson, published online by Manchester & Lancs. FHS, has a chapter on Edenfield in early 18thC with contemporary map, and a chapter on the village of Summerseat, just South of Nuttall. The Summerseat chapter has small pictures of Nuttall Hall and Grants' Tower and a little bit about the Grant and Peel families. Nuttall Hall was the home of the Grant family, the millowners who developed Ramsbottom. Charles Dickens put them in a novel as the Cheeryble Brothers.

David Robinson's book is available as a pdf. mlfhs.org.uk/articles/Always_Turn_the_Page.pdf
Chapter 6 Edenfield pages 30-35, map of Edenfield p.31. (Author may have added details to map.)
Chapter 7 Summerseat 1843-1851, photos of Nuttall Hall and Grants' tower p. 37.

There's a lot more information about the Grant family and their mills in local history publications.

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Re: Bury/Edenfield Areas
« Reply #16 on: Monday 06 August 18 18:40 BST (UK) »
I've just seen this about Summer 2018 edition of Bury & District Local History Society Journal. I haven't read the article so I don't know if it will be any help.

"Field Names in Walmersley" by Fred Slater. Apparently it's an old article, recently discovered. Neither do I know how large an area the article covers. Walmersley-cum-Shuttleworth was a township in 19thC and an electoral ward in 20th.
A meeting advertised in the journal is "Origins of place names" .
www.burylhs.org.uk/journal.html
An order form can be downloaded.

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Re: Bury/Edenfield Areas
« Reply #17 on: Monday 06 August 18 19:32 BST (UK) »
That sounds very favourable and looks like the place I mentioned on 1893 map. :)

Nuttall Hall is shown on the 1893 map, just south of the highlighted Shuttleworth square. The river forms a large curve to the west of the hall.  A little distance to the south of Nuttall Hall are the mill and some buildings which might have been terraces of workers' cottages. "Cotton mill" is written on map. Mill and cottages are conveniently situated between river and railway line. "Nuttall" is written near this collection of buildings. The solitary cottage and industrial archaeological remains, the latter hidden by vegetation, which I mentioned in earlier posts were in this area, late 20thC.
An area marked "Nuttall Lane" is about half-a-mile west of the hamlet of Nuttall, at the crossroads. Nuttall Lane was one of the original roads to Holcombe Village. The part of the lane above the present main road (Bolton Road West and Bolton St.) is now called Dundee Lane. A few cottages in Dundee Lane are very old and may have been handloom weavers' cottages, predating industrialisation. From this Nuttall Lane area it's a short, steep walk to Holcombe Church, shorter still through fields and wood.