Author Topic: YDNA confusion, surnames, sales hype  (Read 1095 times)

Online Ruskie

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Re: YDNA confusion, surnames, sales hype
« Reply #18 on: Friday 14 December 18 11:17 GMT (UK) »
NPE can also stand for "Not Parent Expected"

https://www.yahoo.com/gma/dna-test-upends-identity-family-secret-facebook-group-124208111--abc-news-topstories.html

https://www.npefellowship.org/

The term "Not parent expected" is a bit deceptive in regards to family history. A female will always know that she is the mother of her child, but the male can't always be sure he is the father.
I think the use of "paternal" is preferable.

"Not parent expected" may be used in America rather than elsewhere.


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Offline pughcd

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Re: YDNA confusion, surnames, sales hype
« Reply #19 on: Friday 14 December 18 12:01 GMT (UK) »
Hi @diplodicus

Yes you are correct the FT-DNA Y-DNA Haplotree will show your presumed or confirmed SNP results in specific colours.
SNPs tested positive will show in green.
SNPs tested negative will show in red.
SNPs presumed positive will show in brown.
SNPs presumed negative will show in black.
SNPs downstream show in blue.

I have a number of SNPs downstream (blue) of my current terminal SNP,  BY151. I could take these as individual tests or upgrade from 111 markers to the Big-Y500.

pughcd
Ingham, Crabtree, Ogden, Haworth, Wharfe, Proctor - Yorkshire, Dixon, Spooner - Westmorland, Drinkwater - Lancashire,  Gonsalves - Goa, India, Oberbremer, Baute, Rieke, Lindemeier, Sewing, Mesterheide, Clauss, Breitenkamp, Schulten, Hohenschild, Althoff, Wortmann, - North-Rhine Westphalia, Germany, Grolms, Schonscheck, Weiss, Schwartz, Stephan, Weissin, Kossiner -West Prussia

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Offline pughcd

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Re: YDNA confusion, surnames, sales hype
« Reply #20 on: Friday 14 December 18 12:38 GMT (UK) »
Hi @Ruskie,

Yes the acronym NPE explanation seems to depend where you live.

Thanks,
pughcd
Ingham, Crabtree, Ogden, Haworth, Wharfe, Proctor - Yorkshire, Dixon, Spooner - Westmorland, Drinkwater - Lancashire,  Gonsalves - Goa, India, Oberbremer, Baute, Rieke, Lindemeier, Sewing, Mesterheide, Clauss, Breitenkamp, Schulten, Hohenschild, Althoff, Wortmann, - North-Rhine Westphalia, Germany, Grolms, Schonscheck, Weiss, Schwartz, Stephan, Weissin, Kossiner -West Prussia

Offline RobertCasey

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Re: YDNA confusion, surnames, sales hype
« Reply #21 on: Sunday 30 December 18 18:26 GMT (UK) »
"Non-Paternity Event" is the original and most accepted term for NPE. It really means that the surname associated with the father is not consistent with YDNA results. There are many ways the transmission of surname from father to son may not track the YDNA transmission: 1) the most common is probably via adoption (children of neighbors/relatives killed by war, famine, disease, etc.) or young widow remarries and her children take on the surname of her second husband; 2) swearing an allegiance to a clan and taking on the clan surname; 3) due to the wealth of the mother, the father has to take on the surname of the mother in order to get blessing for marriage and received inheritance or gain favor from the wealthy; 4) Infidelity of the wife during marriage to husband; 5) rape of wife by slavery, conquest during wars, sexual crimes, etc.; 6) Changing of surnames - avoiding the law, did not like the surname and just changed it, etc.; 7) Some lords had bedding rights of new brides under their protection.
Casey - Tipperary or Clare, Ireland
Kelly - Ireland
Brooks, Bryan, Shelton (2), Harper, Williamson - England
Tucker, Arrington, Stevenson, Shears, Jarvis - England
Hill (2), Reed, Olliff, Jackson, Potter, Cruse, Charlton - England
Davis. Martin, Ellison, Woodward, Alderson - England
Pace - Shropshire, England
Revier - Netherlands
Messer - Germany
Wininger - Switzerland

Offline RobertCasey

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Re: YDNA confusion, surnames, sales hype
« Reply #22 on: Sunday 30 December 18 19:25 GMT (UK) »
I am one of the admins for the R-L226 haplogroup project, the third largest haplogroup (dominated by Irish heritage) that has one YSTR signature (which is over 99 % predictable). For an extreme case, we now have 81 67 marker or higher testers that belong to one particular O'Brien surname cluster (descendants of King Brian Boru, the first king to unite/conquer the entire island of Ireland). Being royal and conquering your neighbors has its advantages as this line has a prolific number of male descendants that can be tested.

The O'Brien surname cluster has 81 testers at 67 or more markers, 19 YSNP branches within this surname cluster and another 25 YSTR branches. This is 44 branches just for one man who first used the surname of O'Brien around 1,000 AD. R-L226 also has 20 other surname clusters where there are at least five testers with the same surname (or variants) and have less than a 50 % NPE rate at any branching event (YSNP or YSTR). This surname cluster starts with the box labeled "TMRCA = 1000 AD" and takes eight pages to show the connections:

http://www.rcasey.net/DNA/R_L226/Haplotrees/L226_Home.pdf#Page=76

My Casey surname now has 24 67 marker testers, two YSNP branches and five YSTR branches.

http://www.rcasey.net/DNA/R_L226/Haplotrees/L226_Home.pdf#Page=44

So R-L226 is finally making some serious progress - but this is not consistent for everyone. But our project has grown over 100 % in size during the last 18 months and now has 160 Big Y tests due to the significant progress that our prolific project is making. The largest Irish/Scottish haplogroup that has one YSTR signature is much older and has five times as many testers. The second largest Irish haplogroup, CTS4466 is around 50 % larger than L226. Around one third of our 760 testers are assigned to branches under surname clusters - that is a lot of genealogically significant information to work with. On the other hand, some haplogroups only have 20 or 30 testers and five or so branches which is really too small of a sample size to determine all the connections. But even these smaller haplogroups have 20 or 30 % of the tester belonging to well defined YSTR branches within YSNP branches.
Casey - Tipperary or Clare, Ireland
Kelly - Ireland
Brooks, Bryan, Shelton (2), Harper, Williamson - England
Tucker, Arrington, Stevenson, Shears, Jarvis - England
Hill (2), Reed, Olliff, Jackson, Potter, Cruse, Charlton - England
Davis. Martin, Ellison, Woodward, Alderson - England
Pace - Shropshire, England
Revier - Netherlands
Messer - Germany
Wininger - Switzerland