Author Topic: World War One. Gipsy Roll of Honour.  (Read 22888 times)

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Re: World War One. Gipsy Roll of Honour.
« Reply #162 on: Monday 13 April 20 21:43 BST (UK) »
In this link below the knowledge as helped me greatly, I have not though found a link to the writing in the stated book Tomlinson's Comprehensive Guide to Northumherland, everything I find is free to read through links yet Tomlinsons one I have not found, the rest of the genealogical story accounts are readable through their original sourse



 
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=inu.39000005845693



 SCOTTISH  GYPSIES
UNDER THE STEWARTS
BY
DAVID  MACRITCHIE 
AUTHOR OF "the GYPSIES OF INDIA," ETC.
EDINBUEGH: DAVID DOUGLAS 1894 
extracts
   

IT is evident, therefore, that the word " tinker " or " tinkler," although often applied to genuine Gypsies, cannot be regarded as actually synonymous with " Gypsy." A similar uncertainty attaches to the word " faw." Under the forms Faw, Faa, and Fall it has figured conspicuously as a Gypsy surname for about four centuries, especially in connection with the Border districts. " In Northumberland," says one writer, " the name has become generic for the whole tribe of travelling tinkers and muggers, who, in that county, are much more frequently called Faas than Gypsies." So much is this the case that Wright, in his Provincial Dictionary, defines " Faw " as signifying " an itinerant tinker, potter &c. ; " and Halliwell, in quoting the Cumberland term of a " Faw-gang," or " a gang of faws," refers to a certain "Francis Heron, King of the Faws who was buried at  Jarrow in 1756. " One thing is certain," observes a writer in Wilson's Tales of the Borders " that the name Faa not only was given to individuals whose surname might be Fall, but to the Winters and Clarkes—id genus omne—Gipsy families well known on the Borders……………………………….



…………………………… extracts from Sykes's Local Records (1833)   — viz., J. Fall and Margaret, his wife ; William Fall and Jane, his wife These felons were part of the very numerous gangs of Faws who infested the county of Northumberland, and who were incessantly shopbreaking and plundering. Fourteen were advertised as having returned within two years, and were again lurking about Northumberland……………………..


………………….See also E. Mackenzie. History of Newcastle, 1827, vol. i. p. 57. (P. 203)—] 752, July 1 1.—Seven of the gang of Faws, who had been a terror to Rothbury and its neighbourhood, were apprehended, and sent to Morpeth Gaol. Several more were pursued to the mountains ; but could not be come at…………………..   



……………………………………(P. 209)—1754, Aug. 24.—A woman named Elizabeth Rochester made her escape from Durham Gaol. She was one of the gang of Faws, or strolling depredators, who infested the northern counties at this period. (P. 213)—1756, Jan. 13.—In the burial register of Jarrow Church under this date, occurs "Francis Heron, king of ye Faws" (Sharpe, Chronicon Mirabile). (P. 261)—1767, Apr. 18. —Richard Clark was executed at York for breaking into a house near Knaresborough. As this man was one of the Faw-gang which so long infested the county of Northumberland ……………………

………………………Tomlinson's Comprehensive Guide to Northumherland, p. 309 : — " One Margaret Crozier was murdered, 29th Aug. 1791, at Haws Pele, 3 miles N. of Elsdon, by William Winter, a desperate character, 'at the instigation and with the assistance of two female faws (vendors of crockery and tinwork) named Jane and Eleanor Clark, who, in their wanderings, had experienced the kindness of Margaret Crozier ………………


………………..Winter is thus described by another writer : — " This man belonged to a family which was one of the worst of a bad gang of faws, itinerant tinkers, who formerly infested this part of Northumberland in considerable numbers, robbing and threatening the small farmers, who would not allow them to lodge in their out-houses, and who did not, either in provisions or money, pay them a kind of black-mail, Winter is described, by the country people who remember him, as a tall, powerful man, of dark complexion, wearing his long black hair hanging about his shoulders, and of a most savage countenance. The appearance of this ruffian in a small village was a signal for the inhabitants to close their doors ; Avhile he, as if proud of the terror which he inspired, would keep walking back and forward, with his arms a-kimbo, on the green."  From these various extracts it is evident that the name " Faw " has long been used on the Borders to denote the Gypsy or semi-Gypsy castes, although the people spoken of as " Faws " bore, in a great many cases, such surnames as Winter, Clark, Heron, or Rochester, and only occasionally were actually named " Fall," otherwise " Faw." 

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Re: World War One. Gipsy Roll of Honour.
« Reply #163 on: Monday 13 April 20 21:50 BST (UK) »

 https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Blackwood%27s_Magazine/Volume_1/Issue_2/Notices_Concerning_the_Scottish_Gypsies
1817   
extract
 
"Mr Smith, the respectable Bailie of Kelso, can give the most complete information concerning those who reside at Kirk-Yetholm. Formerly, I believe, they were much more desperate in their conduct than at present. But some of the most atrocious families have been extirpated; I allude particularly to the Winters, a Northumberland clan, who, I fancy, are all buried by this time.
"Mr Riddell, Justice of Peace for Roxburghshire, with my assistance and concurrence, cleared this county of the last of them, about eight or nine years ago. They were thorough desperadoes, of the worst class of vagabonds. Those who now travel through this county give offence chiefly by poaching and small thefts. They are divided into clans, the principal names being Faa, Baillie, Young, Ruthven, and Gordon.

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Re: World War One. Gipsy Roll of Honour.
« Reply #164 on: Monday 13 April 20 21:54 BST (UK) »

 https://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/NBL/Crime
extracs
 House of Correction, Newcastle, January 10th. 1782.
THREE PERSONS (Part of a Gang of Thieves) in PRISON here.
A MAN who calls himself HENRY CUNNINGHAM, appears to be about 30 years of age, 5 feet 9 inches high, of a dark swarthy complexion, thin faced, has black dull eyes, long black rough hair……………………….. 


Morpeth Gaol, July 23rd 1785
The felons in Morpeth Gaol are: Joseph Miller, James Wintrip, alias Winter…………………
 House of Correction, Newcastle, March 2nd 1786
Two suspected Persons in the House of Correction Here., ONE of them calls himself ABRAHAM SMITH, a Tinker, says he was born at Lead-Gate, near Ryton, and has lived at Bishop Auckland for about a year and a half past, and was lately a soldier in the Fencibles in America; he appears to be about 21 years of age, 5 feet 5 inches high, has a dark or swarthy complection, long dark brown hair, curled at his ears, black eyes………………………………… 
The other calls himself JOHN COOPER, says he was born at Bishop Monkton, near Ripon, in Yorkshire, but was brought up and chiefly lived at Barnard Castle, has been formerly two or three voyages at sea, and lately got his bread by selling books and pamphlets, &c., he appears to be about 17 years of age, about 5 feet 2 inches and a half high, has dark brown hair, very thick and rough on the top of his head, grey eyes, and a fair complection……………………… 
The above two persons are supposed to be part of the notorious gang of thieves called the Bishop Auckland-Gang, otherwise the Barlow-Gang, otherwise the Gateshead-Fell-Gang, so called from some of them residing, and others occasionally rendezvousing at these places.
 
Northumberland Quarter Sessions, May 6th, 1786
At the General Quarter Sessions of the Peace held at Morpeth, the 26th day of April last,..................   and Ann Bennett, and Jane Winterup, otherwise Jane Winter, for twelve months each
 Morpeth, August 2nd, 1788
We hear that the noted John and Robert Winter, (father and son) who were found guilty of burglary, and received sentence of death at the last Assizes for Northumberland, are to be executed, pursuant to their sentence, on Fair Moor, near Morpeth, on Wednesday next, at eleven o'clock in the forenoon.
Morpeth, August 9th, 1788
On Wednesday John and Robert Winter, father and son, were executed on the Fair Moor, near Morpeth, pursuant to their sentence, at the last assizes, for breaking into the house of William Charlton, Esq; at Hesleside, they appeared to be perfectly resigned to their unhappy situation, and as they were going to be turned off, the younger Winter addressed the numerous spectators of their melancholy situation, in a very unexpectedly pathetic speech, in which he observed, that having been brought up without any regard to morality of religion, the progress of evil had so rapidly over-run his inclination, that at any early age he was arrived at the full maturity of vice, in the pursuance of which he experienced so many dreadful pangs, that he could not pretend to say, whether his ignominious untimely end was more piercing than the uneasiness he had felt in his various pursuits of rapince and depredation, which he had been in practice from his infancy, and in which he was much aided by the ill example shewn by his profligate parents. He then warned the younger part of the assembled populace, to beware of the practice of evil deeds, and recommended a particular attention to the duties of religion, and special observance of the sabbath, a day he had never been taught to reverence; and with the great importance of which he was so totally unacquainted; and that he had never, to his knowledge, attended a place of divine worship. He then met his unhappy fate with uncommon fortitude, whilst his unfortunate father seemed to be totally bereft of any sense of his dreadful situation.

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Re: World War One. Gipsy Roll of Honour.
« Reply #165 on: Monday 13 April 20 22:04 BST (UK) »
https://gladstoneuk.bandcamp.com/track/the-ballad-of-william-winter

An old gibbet set high on a windswept Northumberland moor, the last resting place for an evil man.
lyrics
Winter was a bad man, he came from a bad lot
eighteen years for petty crimes in prison cells left to rot
they hanged his brother before him
they hanged his father as well
but he didn't learn his lesson as he sat there in his cell

Winter was a cruel man, his temper it was hot
he murdered Margaret Crozier, stole everything she'd got
they hanged his brother before him
they hanged his father as well
now the hangman's sent his soul to a fiery hell

listen to my story
heed my warning well
as my body swings in the crisp cold air
my soul resides in hell

The Clark sisters were also hanged for their part in the crime
their bodies sent to surgeon's hall and damned for all time
they hanged his brother before him
they hanged his father as well
Winter's body now hangs in chains on a gibbet at Steng cross fell

listen to my story
heed my warning well
as my body swings in the crisp cold air
my soul resides in hell

William Winter, you have been found guilty of the heinous crime of murder,
you will be taken from here to a place of execution, where you will be hanged by the neck until you are dead,
and may God have mercy upon your soul.....................


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Re: World War One. Gipsy Roll of Honour.
« Reply #166 on: Monday 13 April 20 22:07 BST (UK) »


 http://www.ndfhs.org/pdfs/Vol-20-No-4.pdf
extracts
vol. 20, No. 4   winter 1995
page 131

THE BISHOP AUCKLAND GANG by George Bell

The Bishop Auckland Gang achieved notoriety in the 1780's as a "Gang of Thieves and Pickpockets, who have for some time past infested the markets in this town (Newcastle), and generally resort to fairs in the country". The core members of the gang belonged to two Northumberland families, the Winter's and the Clark's, six of whom, John Winter and his sons Robert and William, and Walter Clark and his daughters Jane and Eleanor, ended their days at `the fatal tree'……………   


……………….THE MEMBERS OF THE GANG AND THEIR CRIMES The activities of the Bishop Auckland Gang were brought to prominence in a Hue & Cry published in the Newcastle Courant of 12th January 1782. This identified 11 members of the gang, three of whom, Henry Cunningham and his de facto wife Ann Hamilton, and Mary Wilson   (Tate, wife of William Wilson), were being held in custody. Still at large were Elizabeth Whitebread, Thomas Douglas and his (unnamed) wife, Thomas's brother John Douglas and his wife Eleanor, and their 15 year old son David, and Thomas Colpits and his (unnamed) wife  …………..


……………………….Saturday last, four persons belonging to the notorious gang of Thieves and Shop-lifters, called the Bishop Auckland Gang, otherwise the Barlow Gang, otherwise the GatesheadFell-Gang……………………….


 

………………………. The brothers John and William Winter were tried at the Northumberland Assizes in 1784 for stealing rags from the warehouse of Aaron Dowley of Hexham. They were acquitted of the charge, but were removed the same day by Habeas Corpus to Newcastle, where they were convicted of stealing an ass, for which they were sentenced to seven years transportation. The law eventually caught up with their brother Robert, and father John; both were sentenced to be hanged at the Northumberland Assizes of 1788 for horse stealing……………..   

 ……………………………… Newcastle Courant (10th September 1791) undoubtedly echoed the sentiments of his readers when he wrote:- "It is hoped the remainder of this wicked gang will soon be taken, and brought to that condign punishment so justly due to the enormity of their offences"…………………   

…………………………………..   Walter was finally arrested and tried at the Northumberland Quarter Sessions in July 1793, when he was sentenced to death for the crime of burglary. Again, there was no respite; he was executed on Fair Moor on Wednesday 14th August. The Newcastle Courant (17th August 1793) reported on the hanging:-   Clarke, at the fatal tree, and during his confinement, behaved with great penitence, acknowledged his guilt, implored the prayers of the good and virtuous, and admonished the wicked to take warning by his untimely end, but refused to give any account of his practices, or of the gang of the Winters, with whom it is supposed he was connected, except that he was the father of the two unhappy girls who suffered with one of them last year! …………………………

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Re: World War One. Gipsy Roll of Honour.
« Reply #167 on: Monday 13 April 20 22:24 BST (UK) »
This below is just a few of  the reports from 1923, along with all their relations the Winters where said to be in this film that was also named the Children of the Caravan


 

Tuesday 25 September 1923
Dundee Courier
Angus
Scotland

“THE ROMANY” AT DUNDEE
  “THE ROMANY” AT DUNDEE. Overdrawn Scottish Characters. Film producers seem unable to present a Scottish film free from exaggeration of Scottish character. The Romany, at present showing in the Scala, is an example. The Scottish characters are on lines familiar  from American-made films. The Romany was produced in Glen Tilt, and one expected something better than a caricature of Scottish characterisation. The film idea of a Scot seems to be: —Take a man, put a tamo' shanter on him. gravat  (even on a summer's day) round his neck or a plaid over his shoulder, and make him produce—at least once—a gill bottle. The herdsman in The Romany fits this bill. He produces a bottle, takes a sup, and talks about ma maistor's lands.   The Scottish sub-titles are also a weak point………….. No doubt there are difficulties producing satisfactory realistic Scots on the screen, and difficult to recall a film where the detail in this respect was without blemish. In other respects The Romany is quite a good film, though in the early part of last night's showing it was presented much too quickly, and people had difficulty in reading the descriptive passages. The gipsy element is boldly depicted with many strong characters. Many people will be interested in the scenic attractions, and these are well done, and in many parts the players are staged amid settings of native beauty, some magnificent views of Glen Tilt being shown. Victor Maclaglen as the Romany, plays the part of the forecful leader to perfection. To escape the attentions of a wealthy farmer. Flora, a pretty Scottish girl, runs from nome, and is befriended by a band of gipsies. The Romany chief, although in love with Valict, one his own tribe, falls a victim to the charms of Flora. Event follows event with amazing rapidity, and the climax is reached when the gipsy gets struck by lightning while  a duel for Flora is being fought.
 

Wednesday 29 August 1923
Dundee Courier
Angus
Scotland

PITLOCHRY FOLKS' INTEREST IN ROMANY FILM
 PITLOCHRY FOLKS' INTEREST IN ROMANY FILM. Keen interest was taken in the showing in Pitlochry Picture House last night of the Romany photoplay by Elliot Stannard, which was filmed in the Atholl Highlands last, autumn. The resulting film one of wondrous beauty and The gipsy fair and sheep dog trial scenes in Glentilt and the passing of the whole caravan series along the Grampian highway among the rugged mountains is specially fine. Many district folk assisted in the making of the film, and the showing of familiar figures on the screen created much interest.

 
 

https://earlycinema.gla.ac.uk/


extracs

  With the frowning Grampian Mountains around them the company carried on at Dalnaspidal, the summit of the Grampians, and later went on to Glen Tilt, owned by the Duke of Atholl, who generously placed his estate at the disposal of the company, offering every facility for filming exterior scenes around about the picturesque cottages and among his Highland cattle and sheep.
The film called for the real gipsies, who were found at Buckie Fair, and they gladly and enthusiastically joined forces, giving a wonderful air of reality to the production. These gipsies, the king of whom is Samson Young and the queen Wilhelmina Young, hail from Epping Forest, and with their sixteen caravans, fifty horses, and 195 caravan and tent inhabitants added picturesqueness to the whole production, besides acquitting themselves excellently in the parts of supers, in which they were joined by many of the local inhabitants clad in Highland dress.




Even when not actually working before the camera Victor McLaglen does not allow himself a complete rest. During the last week he has been up in Scotland with Mr Martin Thornton, who will direct him in his next film, searching for good types of gipsies to act as 'atmosphere' for the next film in which Mr. McLaglen will play. After many days search they found the gipsies they wanted. They are one of the oldest Romany tribes to be found in Scotland, and McLaglen said it was exceedingly difficult to persuade them to accept Mr Thornton's offer of financial reward for their services as film actors. 'They are exceedingly proud of their ancestry,' says McLaglen, 'and were very much opposed at first to the idea of appearing on the film, especially when we told them we would pay them. The head gipsy made me understand that they were not in need of money - however, we eventually won them to our side, and for several weeks whilst the film, is being made we are to live with them in their camp.'

this photo below is from the film above, Winters Boswells, Youngs, Shaws, they are behind the three actors at the front, i read this on the internet but only the Winter families of today would be able to confirm this as true
 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Crowd_by_caravans_(6210681933).jpg

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Re: World War One. Gipsy Roll of Honour.
« Reply #168 on: Monday 13 April 20 22:43 BST (UK) »
If there is anyone who would be able to expand on this research I would welcome your input, all records regarding the Winters I am collecting, if you have anything what so ever I would appreciate you sharing your finding, all the related family's I would like to hear of plus locations and everything is of most importance, no detail is worth overlooking in my search for the truth, I hope I to through sharing, my research may help others, that is my biggest goal of all, I will finish part three of three of the Winters some time in the future as I have collected much information, to me they are another great Gipsy family, systematically it seems they have been left out of many records of so-called scholars and when wrote of it is mostly been in a bad sense, through all my writing of all their life's I hope their relatives of the future will get to know more of the truth of their ancestors, I do not read like other people, I do not see like other people, maybe others will never understand what I see

So maybe in a few weeks i will put on the last records of the Winters, they to were caught up in the war years, there is no doubt in my mind they are a strong Gipsy family of great renown history and tradition of the hightest order

 

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Re: World War One. Gipsy Roll of Honour.
« Reply #169 on: Saturday 06 June 20 20:57 BST (UK) »
 Hi everyone

I do hope all are well, would there be anyone who would help me in my research, i am at present researching the Winter Family who are a Family court up in the world war one account's, this is my own way of personal research to learn and share for not only you but for future people and relatives to learn the real truth and get my personal input that will not be there when i am dead, the point at this time is i write of the writings of others to teach of the past but now i think some of the old writers may of just twisted or plain made things up, this is of most importance for they are the same type who wrote of everything, every and all accounts, evan the census records, if the truth be known, the truth should be known, so if i put some evidence up is there anyone who would help me evaluate my findings, if not i will strike out alone, but i would like some educated help to stear me through what may be a strange place, George Hall quoted Scott, and true Scott was quoted by Simson about the Winters, but what if the truth was first lied about, then what of quotes, what about my quote now, i would like someone to come forwards and help me and evan say what i say is maybe wrong, if not i will try my best to help others to navigate the history of my genealogical research

regards michael

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Re: World War One. Gipsy Roll of Honour.
« Reply #170 on: Sunday 07 June 20 10:40 BST (UK) »
Hello! I would be really interested to hear more about Alfie Gaskin, if you have the time please. I am a military historian from Bury St. Edmunds (some of my work here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUFT4ft6SEk) - I'm also a Gaskin. My grandfather was Marky Gaskin and his father John Henry Gaskin (my namesake).

I go to the battlefields often and would love to hear more about Alfie, how I relate to him and where he is buried to visit myself.

Thank you in advance.

Hi thank you for the enclosed. Made interesting reading.

This picture is Alfie Gaskin originally from Sudbury, enlisted into the army in 1917 at Byker Showground, Newcastle. He was killed outside Ypres.