Author Topic: Help deciphering condition of Roderick Torrence  (Read 375 times)

Offline Katsy8

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Help deciphering condition of Roderick Torrence
« on: Saturday 24 November 18 21:39 GMT (UK) »
Can anyone please help me deciphering condition of Roderick Torrence .
Itís something brother but am unsure.
Many thanks .

Offline Ruskie

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Re: Help deciphering condition of Roderick Torrence
« Reply #1 on: Saturday 24 November 18 21:44 GMT (UK) »
 :)
It looks a bit like Good Brother, but the second o in good doesn't look right so probably not an o, and there seems to be a full stop after "good" so it may be an abbreviated word. I can't think what kind of brother would start with a G though ....  :-\

Offline Katsy8

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Re: Help deciphering condition of Roderick Torrence
« Reply #2 on: Saturday 24 November 18 21:53 GMT (UK) »
Thanks Russkie I just googled some census terms and finally found  good brother means brother in-law  :o
Thatís a new one for me.
Many thanks

Offline Ruskie

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Re: Help deciphering condition of Roderick Torrence
« Reply #3 on: Saturday 24 November 18 22:35 GMT (UK) »
Glad you have sorted it. I haven't heard that one before either.  :)


Offline Henry7

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Re: Help deciphering condition of Roderick Torrence
« Reply #4 on: Saturday 24 November 18 22:41 GMT (UK) »
It's fairly normal Scottish dialect - within recent memory, if not nowadays.

"Gude-brither" means brother-in-law according to the Scots dictionary, and I have certainly heard my grandparents (born in the 1870s) use the term.
Ballingall, Donaldson, Fulton, Gillespie, Ramsay, Walker - in Fife.
Bury - in Salford & Liverpool.
Jack - in Glasgow, Dunfermline & Dundee.
Bermingham/Birmingham - in Cork.
Eagle - in Norfolk, Edinburgh & Glasgow.

Offline Ruskie

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Re: Help deciphering condition of Roderick Torrence
« Reply #5 on: Saturday 24 November 18 22:47 GMT (UK) »
Just googled and found out a bit more about the term. I also discovered that I had heard it before on a previous rootschat thread.  ;D

Offline Skoosh

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Re: Help deciphering condition of Roderick Torrence
« Reply #6 on: Saturday 24 November 18 22:49 GMT (UK) »
Good brother, still used in the villages NE of Glasgow & no doubt further afield. First time I heard it from a workmate I thought the other/s must be b-------s!  ;D

Skoosh.