Author Topic: Poor Law "pass"  (Read 332 times)

Offline Top-of-the-hill

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Poor Law "pass"
« on: Wednesday 28 November 18 21:59 GMT (UK) »
   I have a reference in a churchwardens accounts for 1818 - "Relieved 2 sailors with a pass". Would I be right in assuming this is something to do with the Poor Law and vagrancy? A pass to allow them to reach home?
Pay, Kent
Codham/Coltham, Kent
Kent, Felton, Essex
Staples, Wiltshire

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Offline Old Bristolian

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Re: Poor Law "pass"
« Reply #1 on: Wednesday 28 November 18 22:12 GMT (UK) »
Yes, I believe the pass was to authorize the churchwardens of parishes passed through to grant relief (possibly food, lodging or cash)

Steve
Bumstead - London, Suffolk
Plant, Woolnough, Wase, Suffolk
Flexney, Godfrey, Burson, Hobby -  Oxfordshire
Street, Mitchell - Gloucestershire
Horwood, Heale Drew - Bristol
Gibbs, Gait, Noyes, Peters, Padfield, Board, York, Rogers, Horler, Heale, Emery, Clavey, Mogg, - Somerset
Fook, Snell - Devon
M(a)cDonald, Yuell, Gollan, McKenzie - Rosshire
McLennan, Mackintosh - Inverness
Williams, Jones - Angelsey & Caernarvon

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Offline Bookbox

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Re: Poor Law "pass"
« Reply #2 on: Thursday 29 November 18 00:11 GMT (UK) »
Not necessarily to reach home, but to reach any destination named on the pass, which was often a place of employment.

The 'pass' system fell out of favour shortly after this date, as explained on the Workhouses website ...
http://www.workhouses.org.uk/vagrants/index.shtml#Pre-1834
"During the same period, an informal system grew up of magistrates issuing passes which would allow the bearer to travel unmolested to a named destination and in cases to request a night's board or a few pence for a day's subsistence from an overseer or churchwarden. However, the pass system was widely abused and was in fact increasing vagrancy rather than reducing it. By 1821, a Parliamentary Select Committee estimated that around 60,000 people were perpetually circulating around the country at the public's expense. The Committee concluded that the pass system "has been found to be one of inefficiency, cozenage and fraud."

Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Poor Law "pass"
« Reply #3 on: Thursday 29 November 18 15:17 GMT (UK) »
Looking up surnames of my Irish ancestors in Lancashire Archives turned up many vagrant passes during this period with destination Liverpool for embarkation back to Ireland. Some were soldiers returning home; others might have been itinerant labourers. Names included females.

Offline Milliepede

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Re: Poor Law "pass"
« Reply #4 on: Thursday 29 November 18 15:56 GMT (UK) »
"Relieved" seems an odd word to use but maybe I am connotating the word incorrectly.
Hinchliffe Huddersfield Wiltshire

Offline stanmapstone

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Re: Poor Law "pass"
« Reply #5 on: Thursday 29 November 18 16:26 GMT (UK) »
Relieved: Provided with money, food, etc.; given relief i.e.  assistance given to the poor from funds administered under the Poor Law or from parish doles.

Stan
Mapstone, Mapston.
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Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Poor Law "pass"
« Reply #6 on: Thursday 29 November 18 22:50 GMT (UK) »
Several Poor Relief Acts were passed into law in 17th and 18th centuries.
An Act for the Relief of the Poor (1601)

An Act for the Better Relief of the Poor of this Kingdom (1662)
 Also known as the Settlement and Removal Act.

An Act for Amending the Laws relating to Settlement, Imployment and Relief of the Poor (1722) a.k.a Knatchbull's Act.

An Act for the better Relief and Employment of the Poor (1782)
a.k.a. Gilbert's Act.

An Act for the Amendment and better Administration of Laws relating to the Poor in England and Wales (1834)
 "Whereas it is expedient to alter and amend the Laws relating to the Relief of poor Persons in England And Wales .."

www.workhouses.org.uk

Btw I've not made a spelling mistake in title of 1722 Act.

Offline Top-of-the-hill

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Re: Poor Law "pass"
« Reply #7 on: Thursday 29 November 18 23:08 GMT (UK) »
   Thank you all. I suggested "going home" as we are within a days walk of the coast, and I was thinking of paid off sailors. The churchwarden paid them 3 shillings, which I thought sounded quite generous. Especially as the (female) church cleaner got 13/- for a whole year!
Pay, Kent
Codham/Coltham, Kent
Kent, Felton, Essex
Staples, Wiltshire