Author Topic: Nineteenth century map of Manchester?  (Read 368 times)

Offline Althea7

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Nineteenth century map of Manchester?
« on: Sunday 02 December 18 16:09 GMT (UK) »
I was wondering if there is a simple way to find an old map of Manchester, from the nineteenth century, that I am able to put markers on for the various places my ancestors lived, maybe just circles with numbers on the map with a key underneath showing the addresses where my ancestors lived and details about the family who lived there and the dates they lived there?

One of my ancestors lived in Sandywells, Salford, and he had a baby daughter in July 1867.  His parents lived in Ancoats and his mother died at the end of December 1867.  I am trying to understand the family relationships and how they would keep in touch with each other, and the distances involved.  Sandywells seems to be a part of Salford that was close to Manchester centre, yet still just on the Salford side of the river Irwell.  They were very poor, so presumably they would have walked these distances?  I wonder how the mother would have transported the baby?  Did poor people have prams back in 1867, or did they carry their baby in their shawl?

I am finding that locality is a vital factor in understanding these ancestors.

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Offline BumbleB

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Re: Nineteenth century map of Manchester?
« Reply #1 on: Sunday 02 December 18 16:22 GMT (UK) »
Paper maps - try Alan Godfrey Maps - http://www.alangodfreymaps.co.uk/lancashire.htm

Online maps try  Old Maps - https://www.old-maps.co.uk/#/

or  NLS maps - https://maps.nls.uk/geo/find/#zoom=5&lat=56.0000&lon=-4.0000&layers=102&b=1&point=0,0

There may be other sources  :-\
Transcriptions and NBI are merely finding aids.  They are NOT a substitute for original record entries.
Remember - "They'll be found when they want to be found" !!!
Archbell - anywhere, any date
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Offline Susan Blackstone

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Re: Nineteenth century map of Manchester?
« Reply #2 on: Sunday 02 December 18 16:35 GMT (UK) »
Try the site National Library of Scotland.  They have a wide range of old UK maps from mid 19th century onwards.  I often use this site.

Offline mazi

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Re: Nineteenth century map of Manchester?
« Reply #3 on: Sunday 02 December 18 16:40 GMT (UK) »
This is Salford 1880s, canít find sandywells tho

https://maps.nls.uk/view/101103782

Mike

Offline Althea7

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Re: Nineteenth century map of Manchester?
« Reply #4 on: Sunday 02 December 18 18:32 GMT (UK) »
I looked at that nls map and it only names the bigger streets.  One of my ancestors, Rebecca Greenwood, was born in July 1867 at 3 Sandywell, Greengate, Salford, which is on her birth certificate. I assume that could mean Sandywell lane?  Which seems to be in the top corner of where the river Irwell comes closest to Manchester centre, just inside the Salford side of the river Irwell, which I understand to be the border between Manchester and Salford?

On the 1871 census, Rebecca and her parents Hiram and Mary Ann Greenwood were living at 25 Ravald Street, Salford.  This is also the address on her death certificate on 25th April 1871.  After that her parents moved out of central Manchester, which was probably seen as not as healthy as the clean air in areas just outside of Manchester?  So many of my ancestors in this family died of lung diseases, from asthma and bronchitis to tuberculosis (Hiram).  Rebecca died of measles.

Offline Althea7

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Re: Nineteenth century map of Manchester?
« Reply #5 on: Sunday 02 December 18 18:38 GMT (UK) »
Try the site National Library of Scotland.  They have a wide range of old UK maps from mid 19th century onwards.  I often use this site.

Thanks, I will have a look. 

Online dobfarm

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Re: Nineteenth century map of Manchester?
« Reply #6 on: Monday 03 December 18 03:19 GMT (UK) »
You may have to register, click sign in (next page) click sign up

The page in link map is 1886 to 1930

http://british-library.georeferencer.com/map/qPtLcIwkERZKlb1RwR5oYw/201312031354-imhjDM/visualize

Fire insurance maps and plans - The British Library 

http://www.bl.uk/onlinegallery/onlineex/firemaps/fireinsurancemaps.html
A selection of historic fire insurance maps and plans from the British Library. ... at the turn of the twentieth century; publication dates range from 1886 to 1930.

http://www.bl.uk/onlinegallery/onlineex/firemaps/england/northwest/mapsu145ubu17u1uf001r.html
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Intended as a Guide only in ancestry research.-It is up to the reader as to any Judgment of assessments of information given! to check from original sources.

In my opinion the marriage residence is not always the place of birth. Never forget Workhouse and overseers accounts records of birth

Offline Ray T

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Offline Susan Blackstone

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Re: Nineteenth century map of Manchester?
« Reply #8 on: Monday 03 December 18 09:32 GMT (UK) »
I have been looking at an old Manchester and areas A-Z  C 1970s and both addresses are in the same grid.  Although the writing is very tiny and difficult to make out without a magnifying glass.  I found a Sandywell St off Springfield Lane which joined Greengate and then into Blackfriars Road.    As mentioned it does seem to be in the top left hand corner of the River Irwell.