Author Topic: What is the occupation?  (Read 848 times)

Offline dobfarm

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 7,337
  • Scarcliffe village Derbyshire
    • View Profile
Re: What is the occupation?
« Reply #9 on: Tuesday 25 December 18 10:17 GMT (UK) »
Looking at to compare the 'o to h' in Johns is the same as the 'o to k' in book- therefore not Bockseller or Bocksiller or Bockciller
and not Dock
Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Any transcription of information does not identify or prove anything.
Intended as a Guide only in ancestry research.-It is up to the reader as to any Judgment of assessments of information given! to check from original sources.

In my opinion the marriage residence is not always the place of birth. Never forget Workhouse and overseers accounts records of birth

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline BushInn1746

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,353
  • Selby 1815. Have You Seen Signature Anywhere Else?
    • View Profile
Re: What is the occupation?
« Reply #10 on: Tuesday 25 December 18 11:23 GMT (UK) »
So when he marries in 1821 he is a bookseller, when his son is born in 1822 he is a miner, then when he daughter is born in 1823 he is a stationer (which relates to bookseller), odd to have a big change in a year, donít you think and then change back?

I suppose maybe he tried something else and didnít like it.

Hello

I see Bockseller derived from Boc. See the first e in Bennett is almost straight

Boc and Bock is of Anglo-saxon and Old English origin. I have also seen it referred to as Germanic A-S (old Anglo-Saxon).

It can be linked to 'bec' which means beech, as in wood.

However, Boc is also linked to Books and Writing. Also gospel, deeds, charters & conveyances.
Bocfell, Parchment and Vellum ['bookfell'].

Bockseller, an old spelling of Bookseller.

A Stationer - also the seller of blank Legal documents to Solicitors, Legal, Business Stationery and blank column lined Accounts and Survey books.

 -----------

boc Book and/or blank Writing Book and Document (blank documents and blank column lined books for Legal, Accounting and Surveying purposes)

boc also linked to Learning and Library

boc linked to the Bible and biblical books.

Mark
"George HOOD of Selby" Before 1812?

Born about 1785 (Yorkshire per 1841 Census)

Married Sarah RUSSELL at Selby 1815 newspaper - "both of that place".

Buried in the Quaker Burial Ground at Selby as "Not in Membership" in 1845, aged 60 years.

George HOOD of Selby was refused Membership of the Quakers in 1836.

Elected Overseer of the Poor of Selby in 1838.

Had both known (Selby) and unknown (some not stated 1846) property interests.

Possible (but unknown) links to COOK and/or PEARSON names.

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline Rena

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 3,394
  • Crown Copyright: www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: What is the occupation?
« Reply #11 on: Tuesday 25 December 18 23:42 GMT (UK) »
By coincidence rather a possible relationship I have the Speight name in my distant line. Cumberland, Northumberland and Durham. Shows the name has a Northern connection.

If I'm following the right family, I'm back in the 1500s and still in Yorkshire in a place called "Darfield".
Since seeing your posting, I'm thinking that now more records are available, than when I followed this trail nearly 20 years ago, I might just need to check my facts.
Aberdeen: Findlay-Shirras,McCarthy
MidLothian: Mason,Telford,Darling,Cruikshanks,Bennett,Sime, Bell
Lanarks:Crum, Brown, MacKenzie,Cameron, Glen, Millar
Ross, Urray:Mackenzie
Moray: Findlay; Marshall/Marischell
Perthshire: Brown Ferguson
Wales: McCarthy, Thomas
England: Almond, Askin, Dodson, Harrison, Maw, McCarthy, Munford, Pye, Shearing, Smith, Smythe, Speight, Strike, Wallis/Wallace, Ward, Wells
Germany: Flamme,Ehlers, Bielstein, Germer, Mohlm, Reupke

Offline AMBLY

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 8,547
    • View Profile
Re: What is the occupation?
« Reply #12 on: Wednesday 26 December 18 08:18 GMT (UK) »
I wonder if he was both - set up his front room as a Booksellers/Stationer which his wife might have run while he was off being a miner for his main income?

I have seen that sort of thing before - not those 2 occupations  - I can't recall off hand in my tree:
Grocer Shop/Dock Labourer or Licensed Innkeeper/Blacksmith - something on those lines.

Cheers
AMBLY

Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

"Now that we're all here, I'm not sure if we're all there...."

 Entre los individuos, como entre las naciones, el respeto al derecho ajeno es la paz
 Among individuals, as among nations, respect for the rights of others is peace
    ~Benito Juarez (1806-1872)

Offline CelticMom

  • RootsChat Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 532
    • View Profile
Re: What is the occupation?
« Reply #13 on: Thursday 27 December 18 18:48 GMT (UK) »
Thanks everyone for you replies. A lot to to consider,

He was living at the docks in devonport in Devon. Two occupations could definitely be plausible.

Sadly he is deceased by the 1841 census. But he definitely seems to stick to  stationer occupatio apart from the one reference to being a miner and a possible military record I have found for him.

Iíve been trying to trace where he came from. The military record states Redruth, Cornwall and I have found a baptism to coincide with that, but unfortunately donít know for definite whether the military record is him.
Anderson & Marr - Midlothian & East Lothian
Bennett - Devonport
Catleugh & Shiells - East Lothian
Cullen & Dowling - Waterford, Ireland
Littlejohns - Plymouth & London
Mansfield - Benfleet & St Pancras
Michelin - London
Newlands - Midlothian & Fife
Paterson - Canongate, Midlothian
Paulin - Northumberland
Rutherford - Roxburghshire
Taylor - East Lothian & Berwickshire
Thomson - Leith & Muthill
Thorney - Herefordshire
Small - Northumberland
Varrall - Kent

Offline bjwil

  • RootsChat Extra
  • **
  • Posts: 2
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: What is the occupation?
« Reply #14 on: Thursday 27 December 18 20:47 GMT (UK) »
Is it possible that the third and fourth letters in "Books. . . " are not "o k" but rather "c k"?  I'm looking at the two "o"s; they're not linked.  Perhaps that's just a characteristic of the handwriting at that time and place but it caught my attention.  Of course, my theory likely just muddied the water for you (back seller? ;) so I shall herewith wish you well with this mystery and crawl back under my rock. 

Offline Maiden Stone

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,039
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: What is the occupation?
« Reply #15 on: Friday 28 December 18 22:39 GMT (UK) »
A year later he is working on the docks as a miner . Very strange and it is all definitely the same person.
Was there a mine near the docks? Could the occupation have been mariner?

Offline Maiden Stone

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,039
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: What is the occupation?
« Reply #16 on: Friday 28 December 18 23:12 GMT (UK) »
I wonder if he was both - set up his front room as a Booksellers/Stationer which his wife might have run while he was off being a miner for his main income?

I have seen that sort of thing before - not those 2 occupations  - I can't recall off hand in my tree:
Grocer Shop/Dock Labourer or Licensed Innkeeper/Blacksmith - something on those lines
I have examples of that for several generations in one line. 18thC they combined butcher and innkeeper because neither was a full-time occupation in a small town off the beaten track. When the town prospered and stagecoaches came, the inn returned a healthy profit and provided employment for father and several sons. Later, in 19thC, the sons, living in a larger town were at various times innkeepers, corn merchants/millers, shopkeepers and bookkeepers. One was a shopkeeper and bacon curer on 1841 census. In 1851 he worked at the docks and his wife was a shopkeeper. He never had the same occupation twice. A brother was a clerk at the coal wharf in one census and a provision merchant in another.