Author Topic: Does 'kinsman' equal 'in-law'? Richard SEAGER and James AGUTTER  (Read 378 times)

Online Gadget

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Re: Does 'kinsman' equal 'in-law'? Richard SEAGER and James AGUTTER
« Reply #9 on: Monday 31 December 18 09:04 GMT (UK) »


By the way Gadget, in all the hundreds of wills I've seen, I've never come across the term 'affines'.
Is it used in a particular way or place?


It is the correct term for in-laws and used generally but, more specifically, in Anthropology. I majored in Anthropology in my first degree.

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affine noun
af·​fine | \a-ˈfīn,
ə-\
Definition of affine

(Entry 1 of 2)

: a relative by marriage : in-law

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/affine
Census &  BMD information Crown Copyright www.nationalarchives.gov.uk and GROS - www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk

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Offline goldie61

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Re: Does 'kinsman' equal 'in-law'? Richard SEAGER and James AGUTTER
« Reply #10 on: Monday 31 December 18 20:25 GMT (UK) »

 I majored in Anthropology in my first degree.




That sounds a very interesting thing to study Gadget.
I expect quite useful in genealogy too.
Lane, Burgess: Cheshire. Finney, Rogers, Gilman:Derbys
Cochran, Nicol, Paton, Bruce:Scotland. Bertolle:London
Bainbridge, Christman, Jeffs: Staffs

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