Author Topic: DNA from Victorian stamps and envelopes  (Read 523 times)

Offline Milliepede

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Re: DNA from Victorian stamps and envelopes
« Reply #9 on: Monday 31 December 18 11:49 GMT (UK) »
Or saved it till next Christmas  :D
Hinchliffe Huddersfield Wiltshire

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Re: DNA from Victorian stamps and envelopes
« Reply #10 on: Monday 31 December 18 11:49 GMT (UK) »
I seem to recall that the flap was just tucked in in the olden days when I was young.  Wasn't there a differential postage rate?
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Offline ShaunJ

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Re: DNA from Victorian stamps and envelopes
« Reply #11 on: Monday 31 December 18 12:00 GMT (UK) »
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I seem to recall that the flap was just tucked in in the olden days when I was young.  Wasn't there a differential postage rate?

As I recall it was 21/2d to send a card in an unsealed envelope, and 3d to send a sealed letter.
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Offline Mart 'n' Al

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Re: DNA from Victorian stamps and envelopes
« Reply #12 on: Monday 31 December 18 12:01 GMT (UK) »
I'm too young to remember the olden days.  I recall my dad's friend in the late 1960s used to send a Hartlepool football paper to us, with just a band of brown paper 4" wide around it, to qualify for a low rate.  My dad's friend used to secrete a hand-written letter inside to get a special rate.  Wow, I haven't thought about that for 50 years.

Martin
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Re: DNA from Victorian stamps and envelopes
« Reply #13 on: Monday 31 December 18 12:08 GMT (UK) »
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I seem to recall that the flap was just tucked in in the olden days when I was young.  Wasn't there a differential postage rate?

As I recall it was 21/2d to send a card in an unsealed envelope, and 3d to send a sealed letter.

So we'd only be able to collect DNA from the posh or wealthy  ;D
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Offline Guy Etchells

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Re: DNA from Victorian stamps and envelopes
« Reply #14 on: Monday 31 December 18 12:37 GMT (UK) »
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I seem to recall that the flap was just tucked in in the olden days when I was young.  Wasn't there a differential postage rate?

As I recall it was 21/2d to send a card in an unsealed envelope, and 3d to send a sealed letter.

So we'd only be able to collect DNA from the posh or wealthy  ;D

No poor folk licked the stamps on most cards and letters they sent.
Cheers
Guy
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Re: DNA from Victorian stamps and envelopes
« Reply #15 on: Monday 31 December 18 12:46 GMT (UK) »
We didn't and we were poor.

I really think the whole idea is a wee bit OTT.


Added - I do have an original marriage cert from 1873 with signatures, etc. It was in the family bible.
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Online Wendy2305

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Re: DNA from Victorian stamps and envelopes
« Reply #16 on: Monday 31 December 18 13:03 GMT (UK) »
American author Patricia Cornwell claims to have done this to identify Jack the Ripper from a stamp from one of the ripper letters She funded a private investigation to identify Jack and published a book on her idea that he was artist Walter Sickert
Unfortunately the test could only be Mitochondrial

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Re: DNA from Victorian stamps and envelopes
« Reply #17 on: Monday 31 December 18 13:23 GMT (UK) »
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Many historians discount claims that Sickert is a suspect in the Jack the Ripper Murders. But like so many of the theories that surround the unsolved mystery, believers of a particular theory will go to any length to prove that they are the ones who have finally cracked the case.

https://allthatsinteresting.com/walter-sickert
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