Author Topic: Why do we say Uncle, rather than Uncle-in-law?  (Read 909 times)

Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Why do we say Uncle, rather than Uncle-in-law?
« Reply #36 on: Tuesday 08 January 19 18:15 GMT (UK) »
Returning to the topic.
I think uncle or "nuncle" was used as a form of address to an elderly man by a younger character in a Shakespeare play. I can't remember which play. I may be wrong.

Raised in a working-class community in North-West England, aunt was auntie but parents were dad and mam or mum not mummy and daddy. Large family on both sides so plenty of aunts and uncles; no need for honorary, unrelated ones. The only time I recall being confused as a child was when a friend referred to someone as "Auntie So & so" when there was no relationship.

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Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Why do we say Uncle, rather than Uncle-in-law?
« Reply #37 on: Tuesday 08 January 19 18:20 GMT (UK) »
When we were little, my brother and I had an "Auntie Scotland" because that's where she lived (a long way away from us). 
The present Queen used to call her paternal grandfather "Grandpapa England". She was 9 or 10 when he died.

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Offline Paulo Leeds

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Re: Why do we say Uncle, rather than Uncle-in-law?
« Reply #38 on: Tuesday 08 January 19 19:04 GMT (UK) »
May I suggest that some posters to this thread read or re-read the following:

"RootsChat Terms of Use
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4.1. As a user you agree not to do any of the following:
1.  Abuse, harass, threaten, stalk, defame or in any way seek to violate the rights of another user or third party "

I'm speaking as a Dutch uncle. (Look it up if you don't know what it means.)
             
I'm currently listening to PM programme Radio 4. Topic being discussed is widespread ill-feeling unleashed by Brexit. Remember Jo Cox M.P. who was murdered. Follow her example - spread happiness not hate.

Agreed. Rosinith decided to get funny with me.

Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Why do we say Uncle, rather than Uncle-in-law?
« Reply #39 on: Tuesday 08 January 19 19:21 GMT (UK) »
May I suggest that some posters to this thread read or re-read the following:

"RootsChat Terms of Use
4.  Specific Forum Rules
4.1. As a user you agree not to do any of the following:
1.  Abuse, harass, threaten, stalk, defame or in any way seek to violate the rights of another user or third party "

I'm speaking as a Dutch uncle. (Look it up if you don't know what it means.)
             
I'm currently listening to PM programme Radio 4. Topic being discussed is widespread ill-feeling unleashed by Brexit. Remember Jo Cox M.P. who was murdered. Follow her example - spread happiness not hate.

Agreed. Rosinith decided to get funny with me.
Just as important as how something begins is how it ends.
I didn't want to report this thread to a moderator.

Offline majm

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Re: Why do we say Uncle, rather than Uncle-in-law?
« Reply #40 on: Tuesday 08 January 19 21:19 GMT (UK) »
I am in Australia,  born and raised in New South Wales central western rural districts ..... born 1947.

Aunts/Aunties and Uncles ... these included Godparents,  siblings Godparents, cousins Godparents and Godparents of school friends and not just both  the parents of my first cousins ....

Also  people my grandparents age who knew me ... if they spoke to me inside my/their/gran/ home were aunt/uncle BUT if at Church or shops or sport or community gathering .... Mr /Mrs Surname or if informal quietly ... as an aside ... Mr S or Mrs S (where S is just the initial capital letter of surname) ... and never interupt your elders,  but stand , hands clasped together in front to show you wish to speak or clasped behind to show you are just listening...

Once you were 'old enough'  ... you could start a conversation otherwise you needed to wait ...and wait ... and .....w a i t ....

My generation quietly grew up and by mid 1960s  chose when to obey and when to ignore those rules ..

JM
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Online Rosinish

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Re: Why do we say Uncle, rather than Uncle-in-law?
« Reply #41 on: Wednesday 09 January 19 14:08 GMT (UK) »
Paulo,

My sincere apologies!

I was having a bad day with a serious issue (no excuse I know)! & automatically took your question the wrong way (wrong frame of mind) & when I logged on later (when I'd calmed down), to delete it, my comp cut out & have been away from home until now.

Annie  :-[
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Newcastle-on-Tyne/Durham (Northumberland):- Harrison, Jude, Kemp, Lunn, Mellon, Robson, Stirling

Kettering, Northampton:- MacKinnon

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Offline SUSANHORTON

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Re: Why do we say Uncle, rather than Uncle-in-law?
« Reply #42 on: Wednesday 09 January 19 14:18 GMT (UK) »
I think this is a very good question. It is irrelevant that it sounds like a mouthful when you say uncle in law John, as you would never use it in that form. You never address your mother in law as mother-in-law Susan or mother-in-law Mrs Smith.

Martin
yes I go along with that. never thought about it til late in adult life and doing family history.
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Offline Mart 'n' Al

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Re: Why do we say Uncle, rather than Uncle-in-law?
« Reply #43 on: Wednesday 09 January 19 14:28 GMT (UK) »
Sloe gin said,
"I will say here that the use of "aunty" or "auntie" always grates on me when someone is referring to their aunt.  It's fine when used with the name ("I'll ask Auntie Jane" or "Happy birthday, Aunty Liz!" but it seems rather childish to say eg "My aunty would know" instead of "My aunt would know".  There's no such issue with "uncle"."

Nunky is often used as an affectionate term for an uncle. I had Nunky John. 45 years ago at school we even used it for our chemistry teacher, Nunky Vernon, who was particularly avuncular.

Martin
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