Author Topic: Is moving all over the UK common in the early 1800s?  (Read 1784 times)

Offline BumbleB

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Re: Is moving all over the UK common in the early 1800s?
« Reply #27 on: Friday 11 January 19 17:33 GMT (UK) »
Fine!   :-*  Always good to know that people do their own research, and don't rely entirely on ........
Transcriptions and NBI are merely finding aids.  They are NOT a substitute for original record entries.
Remember - "They'll be found when they want to be found" !!!
Archbell - anywhere, any date
Kendall - WRY
Milner - WRY
Appleyard - WRY

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Online Maiden Stone

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Re: Is moving all over the UK common in the early 1800s?
« Reply #28 on: Friday 11 January 19 20:46 GMT (UK) »
Re my reply #20 here's an example of a workforce being brought a long distance to Lancashire:
"The earliest cotton spinning mill was built in 1771 about 2 miles downriver from Samlesbury Bottoms by John Watson, a man who saw the potential of the fast-flowing river . and in the child labour he brought out of the London and Liverpool workhouses."
("Cotton Spinning in Samlesbury Bottoms 1770-1890")

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Offline coombs

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Re: Is moving all over the UK common in the early 1800s?
« Reply #29 on: Saturday 12 January 19 16:52 GMT (UK) »
Prior to 1800 I have found several instances of people living a long way from where they were born, and it was not just London as the destination, but I have found locative surnames in the 1700s in areas where the surname is as rare as hens teeth. As BumbleB said, often servants were bought from far away areas so they could not go home when things went wrong.

I have a Sarah Muncaster in north east Essex marrying in 1759. The surname is rare as hens teeth in Essex, and seems to be a Northumberland/Durham name.
Researching:

LONDON, Coombs, Roberts, Auber, Helsdon, Fradine, Morin, Goodacre
DORSET Coombs, Munday
NORFOLK Helsdon, Riches, Harbord, Budery
KENT Roberts, Goodacre
SUSSEX Walder, Boniface, Dinnage, Standen, Lee, Botten, Wickham, Jupp
SUFFOLK Titshall, Frost, Fairweather, Mayhew, Archer, Eade, Scarfe
DURHAM Stewart, Musgrave, Wilson, Forster
SCOTLAND Stewart in Selkirk
USA Musgrave, Saix
ESSEX Cornwell, Stock, Quilter, Lawrence, Whale, Clift
OXON Edgington, Smith, Inkpen, Snell, Batten, Brain

Offline greyingrey

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Re: Is moving all over the UK common in the early 1800s?
« Reply #30 on: Wednesday 30 January 19 12:56 GMT (UK) »
In my families, it happened more than I would have thought. There are some obvious reasons (laceworkers moving from Somerset to Nottingham as the industry moved), someone in London marrying someone from Manchester & moving up there (no  idea how they met) & someone moving from Liverpool to Nottingham for no apparent reason (apart from the football). If you have immigrant or Jewish roots, they tend to  move around a lot at first. My Jewish family in Nottm have a lot of connections with Portsea....I didn't realise till I started this lark that it was one of  the biggest & oldest Jewish communities in  Britain

Offline IgorStrav

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Re: Is moving all over the UK common in the early 1800s?
« Reply #31 on: Wednesday 30 January 19 17:06 GMT (UK) »
And the other thing, which I have only discovered recently, after researching a specific family, is that many people worked on building the railways in the 19th century, and you can see their movements round the country via the birth places of their children (as well as censuses).

I had one relative, a mason, who I can follow from Unthank (his birthplace) in Cumberland, across the Pennines to Derbyshire, South Sheffield.

And the recent research on a family showed children born in Yeadon (Yorks); Bootle (Lancs); Settle (North Yorks - building the Ribblehead Viaduct) where the child is shown as having been born in Batty Wife Hole, the shanty town there, in a subsequent census;  Kimberley, Nottingham; and finally they turned up in East Barnet right opposite the railway line and then in Kentish Town just behind St Pancras.

All this was between 1864 and 1901.

Added:  not suggesting that was what occurred with your family, just as a note when people are wondering about families travelling about in the UK generally.

Pay, Kent. 
Barham, Kent. 
Cork(e), Kent. 
Cooley, Kent.
Barwell, Rutland/Northants/Greenwich.
Cotterill, Derbys.
Van Steenhoven/Steenhoven/Hoven, Belgium/East London.
Burton, East London.
Barlow, East London
Wayling, East London
Wade, Greenwich/Brightlingsea, Essex.
Thorpe, Brightlingsea, Essex

Offline ThrelfallYorky

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Re: Is moving all over the UK common in the early 1800s?
« Reply #32 on: Thursday 31 January 19 14:07 GMT (UK) »
I've also got a family who moved around building railways etc, and popped up from Derby to Leeds, to Settle / Kirby Lonsdale and back to Idle, near Bradford (I'd love to think that was when they retired), IgorStrav.
Threlfall (Southport), Isherwood (lancs & Canada), Newbould + Topliss(Derby), Keating & Cummins (Ireland + lancs), Fisher, Strong& Casson (all Cumberland) & Downie & Bowie, Linlithgow area Scotland . Also interested in Leigh& Burrows,(Lancashire) Griffiths (Shropshire & lancs), Leaver (Lancs/Yorks) & Anderson(Cumberland and very elusive)

Offline coombs

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Re: Is moving all over the UK common in the early 1800s?
« Reply #33 on: Thursday 31 January 19 14:36 GMT (UK) »
People went where the work was, long before the Industrial Revolution.

And some moved gradually across the country over generations. For instance a man born in South Essex in 1800 had a grandfather born in south Suffolk, and in turn he had a grandparent born in Norfolk.

Canals also helped people get around. And if a fisherman from Great Yarmouth in Norfolk married in Leigh On Sea in Essex in the early 1700s, they probably had done may trips there by boat. In the 1700s I have found people from as far away as Yorkshire marrying in Essex.
Researching:

LONDON, Coombs, Roberts, Auber, Helsdon, Fradine, Morin, Goodacre
DORSET Coombs, Munday
NORFOLK Helsdon, Riches, Harbord, Budery
KENT Roberts, Goodacre
SUSSEX Walder, Boniface, Dinnage, Standen, Lee, Botten, Wickham, Jupp
SUFFOLK Titshall, Frost, Fairweather, Mayhew, Archer, Eade, Scarfe
DURHAM Stewart, Musgrave, Wilson, Forster
SCOTLAND Stewart in Selkirk
USA Musgrave, Saix
ESSEX Cornwell, Stock, Quilter, Lawrence, Whale, Clift
OXON Edgington, Smith, Inkpen, Snell, Batten, Brain

Offline Rena

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Re: Is moving all over the UK common in the early 1800s?
« Reply #34 on: Thursday 31 January 19 16:41 GMT (UK) »
I have a few who moved in the 1700s and it was a job to discover where they were born because they were old in 1841 when the census only marked Y or N for born in the county.  I did  eventually solve the whys and wherefores  One Yorkshire farrier enrolled in the army for a short spell and brought home a southern wife. One ancestor born in Yorkshire was brought up by an aunt because her mother had died but her mother had married in a London church, she having travelled down south to work in one of her employer's other homes.

Another method was that there were "hiring fairs" and "feeing markets" where agents travelled to where they set up stalls advertising jobs in other parts of the country.  If, for example a landowner found coal on his land, he leased the mining rights to a coalmaster and the coalmaster would then need to find miners from elsewhere to work for him - usually at a higher wage to attract decent miners.

I believe that merchants in Liverpool and other thriving English seaports used agents to bring skilled stonemasons, etc., from Scotland and elsewhere to build their fine large properties.

As roads were so bad, you can still trace their journeys by when the railroad opened in an area, or prior to that look for travel, by boat on either rivers, canals, or sea, on old maps.

Ag.labs either stayed put, or followed the seasonal work starting in the warmer south and then moving northward

 
Aberdeen: Findlay-Shirras,McCarthy<br />MidLothian: Mason,Telford,Darling,Cruikshanks,Bennett,Sime, Bell<br />Lanarks:Crum, Brown, MacKenzie,Cameron, Glen, Millar
Ross, Urray:Mackenzie<br />Moray: Findlay; Marshall/Marischell<br />Perthshire: Brown Ferguson<br />Wales: McCarthy, Thomas<br />England: Almond, Askin, Dodson, Harrison, Maw, McCarthy, Munford, Pye, Shearing, Smith, Smythe, Speight, Strike, Wallis/Wallace, Ward, Wells<br />Germany: Flamme,Ehlers, Bielstein, Germer, Mohlm, Reupke

Offline coombs

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Re: Is moving all over the UK common in the early 1800s?
« Reply #35 on: Thursday 31 January 19 17:11 GMT (UK) »
I have 3 ancestors who were alive in 1841 "not born in county" and they all died before 1851. One in Essex, one in London and one in Oxfordshire.

Also in the 1700s if someone was in the army, they travelled around. One of my ancestors spent much of the 1770s in America, and was discharged in Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk in 1785 then returned to County Durham.
Researching:

LONDON, Coombs, Roberts, Auber, Helsdon, Fradine, Morin, Goodacre
DORSET Coombs, Munday
NORFOLK Helsdon, Riches, Harbord, Budery
KENT Roberts, Goodacre
SUSSEX Walder, Boniface, Dinnage, Standen, Lee, Botten, Wickham, Jupp
SUFFOLK Titshall, Frost, Fairweather, Mayhew, Archer, Eade, Scarfe
DURHAM Stewart, Musgrave, Wilson, Forster
SCOTLAND Stewart in Selkirk
USA Musgrave, Saix
ESSEX Cornwell, Stock, Quilter, Lawrence, Whale, Clift
OXON Edgington, Smith, Inkpen, Snell, Batten, Brain