Author Topic: Is moving all over the UK common in the early 1800s?  (Read 763 times)

Offline BumbleB

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Re: Is moving all over the UK common in the early 1800s?
« Reply #27 on: Friday 11 January 19 17:33 GMT (UK) »
Fine!   :-*  Always good to know that people do their own research, and don't rely entirely on ........
Transcriptions and NBI are merely finding aids.  They are NOT a substitute for original record entries.
Remember - "They'll be found when they want to be found" !!!
Archbell - anywhere, any date
Kendall - WRY
Milner - WRY
Appleyard - WRY

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Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Is moving all over the UK common in the early 1800s?
« Reply #28 on: Friday 11 January 19 20:46 GMT (UK) »
Re my reply #20 here's an example of a workforce being brought a long distance to Lancashire:
"The earliest cotton spinning mill was built in 1771 about 2 miles downriver from Samlesbury Bottoms by John Watson, a man who saw the potential of the fast-flowing river . and in the child labour he brought out of the London and Liverpool workhouses."
("Cotton Spinning in Samlesbury Bottoms 1770-1890")

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Online coombs

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Re: Is moving all over the UK common in the early 1800s?
« Reply #29 on: Saturday 12 January 19 16:52 GMT (UK) »
Prior to 1800 I have found several instances of people living a long way from where they were born, and it was not just London as the destination, but I have found locative surnames in the 1700s in areas where the surname is as rare as hens teeth. As BumbleB said, often servants were bought from far away areas so they could not go home when things went wrong.

I have a Sarah Muncaster in north east Essex marrying in 1759. The surname is rare as hens teeth in Essex, and seems to be a Northumberland/Durham name.
Researching:

LONDON, Coombs, Roberts, Auber, Helsdon, Fradine, Morin, Goodacre
DORSET Coombs, Munday
NORFOLK Helsdon, Riches, Harbord, Budery
KENT Roberts, Goodacre
SUSSEX Walder, Boniface, Dinnage, Standen, Lee, Botten, Wickham, Jupp
SUFFOLK Titshall, Frost, Fairweather, Mayhew, Archer, Eade, Scarfe
DURHAM Stewart, Musgrave, Wilson, Forster
SCOTLAND Stewart in Selkirk
USA Musgrave, Saix
ESSEX Cornwell, Stock, Quilter, Lawrence, Whale, Clift
OXON Edgington, Smith, Inkpen, Snell, Batten, Brain