Author Topic: Is moving all over the UK common in the early 1800s?  (Read 1590 times)

Offline Andrew Tarr

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Re: Is moving all over the UK common in the early 1800s?
« Reply #36 on: Thursday 31 January 19 17:49 GMT (UK) »
It may not have been 'common', but there are examples in both my tree and my wife's of working people turning up in apparently unlikely places many miles away.

Two of my g-g-g-grandparents married in Manchester in 1806 and later moved to Liverpool, where they died in the 1860s. He was a joiner from Northumberland, she from Shropshire.  My guess is that he worked on the canal (making lock gates? ) which reached Whitchurch about 1805, where they may have met.  A later generation of Devon farmers upped sticks and settled in southern Ireland in the early 1850s.

My wife has an ancestor who appears in the early census making bricks in Bedfordshire, then doing likewise in Sunderland before turning to farming near Consett.  She also has Robinsons who left Suffolk for horse-related employment on Tyneside or in London.

I think the obvious connection between Dunbar and Portsea (Island) will be maritime.  Most of London's coal then came from Tyneside (hence the well-known saying) so there were fleets of coasting ships which could have provided transport.  Also mining industry depended on exporting by sea, and there was regular traffic of mineworkers between Tyneside, Cumberland, south Wales and the west Country; probably also from parts of Scotland.
Tarr, Tydeman, Liversidge, Bartlett, Young

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Offline BushInn1746

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Re: Is moving all over the UK common in the early 1800s?
« Reply #37 on: Thursday 31 January 19 18:39 GMT (UK) »
Both are listed in the records of being of the Parish of Portsea. John spells his surname with two L's, and unusually for the time both signed their name.

I was discussing this point with an Archivist about the very short residence requirement in the Parish, up to the Marriage day and she mentioned 21 days residency by Banns.

If marrying by Banns one week's notice was required (7 days). Then to have the Banns read took 15 days, read on the same day each week including the day of the Marriage, it is either 21 or 22 days in total resident in the Parish (depending if the First Banns can be read on the 7th day of Notice, or the day after). Therefore residency in the Parish can be very short.

Banns were read usually on a Sunday provided that was the main Parish Church Service day, in that Parish. Not all churches and chapels had their main Service on a Sunday.

When applying for a Marriage Licence in 1815 I noticed, one of the Marriage party swore and signed on the Marriage Allegation that the other party (in the Marriage Parish) had her usual abode for the Space of four Weeks last past, ... on the day of swearing.

One having an Abode of Twenty eight days (four weeks) last past, suggests the oath could be made on the 29th day and they could marry that day by Licence.

Considering the amount of trade on the English Waterways and by Sea, it is very disappointing that quite some degree of Maritime and Merchant Crew Musters records survive (pre 1835 back to 1747) at various places in England and yet none of these are online!

Many Muster Rolls record places of Birth and Abode too, often a headache for researchers who feel they might have Mariners and Sailors as Ancestors, or simply don't know at all (due to not being searchable online and/or no reference at Marriage).

Mark
"George HOOD of Selby" Before 1812?

Born about 1785 (Yorkshire per 1841 Census)

Married Sarah RUSSELL at Selby 1815 newspaper - "both of that place".

Buried in the Quaker Burial Ground at Selby as "Not in Membership" in 1845, aged 60 years.

George HOOD of Selby was refused Membership of the Quakers in 1836.

Elected Overseer of the Poor of Selby in 1838.

Had both known (Selby) and unknown (some not stated 1846) property interests.

Possible (but unknown) links to COOK and/or PEARSON names.

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Offline lmfamilyresearch

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Re: Is moving all over the UK common in the early 1800s?
« Reply #38 on: Tuesday 05 March 19 17:29 GMT (UK) »
Thanks everyone for your posts.  It seems to be that moving all over the UK in the 1800s is not as uncommon as I thought it was. 

Unless anyone else has any interesting tidbits to add, this thread should be marked as COMPLETED.

Bennett, Bowling, Braedine/Brodie, Bulmer, Burns, Cochrane, Devlin, Ellis, Garth, Henderson, Holm/Holmes, Kershaw, Masson, McClernon/McLaren/MacLaren, McComb, McKee, Pitt, Rawood, Riddel, Robinson, Whitaker, Wood