Author Topic: Composted Bodies  (Read 990 times)

Offline JohninSussex

  • RootsChat Senior
  • ****
  • Posts: 382
    • View Profile
Re: Composted Bodies
« Reply #18 on: Wednesday 06 February 19 18:05 GMT (UK) »
In the end, burial, composting and cremation all have the same result.  The body is decomposed. Complex organic molecules are broken down into CO2 and water which return to the atmosphere.  The mineral elements remain and are returned to the soil from whence they came.  It can be done quickly or slowly; it can be done by fire or by decomposer organisms, but the end products are the same.

Or in fewer words, Ashes to ashes, dust to dust.
Rutter, Sampson, Swinerd, Head, Redman in Kent.  Others in Cheshire, Manchester, Glos/War/Worcs.
RUTTER family and Matilda Sampson's Will:

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline Gillg

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,284
    • View Profile
Re: Composted Bodies
« Reply #19 on: Thursday 07 February 19 11:08 GMT (UK) »
The only ashes I have seen looked like cat litter, too, Viktoria.  We were presented by the vicar with m-i-l's ashes in a clear plastic bag inside a nasty plastic "urn".  At the designated area for burying ashes in the churchyard the vicar shook the bag out into a hole out like a bag of waste and tucked the bag back into the urn to return to the funeral company, I suppose.  We were so numb with surprise and shock that we just let her do this. :o  Still, I'd rather do that than have someone's ashes on the mantelpiece in a fancy container.  I've told my daughter that I want my ashes to be scattered at the top of Barbon Hill (Cumbria), but I don't think you are actually allowed to scatter ashes willy-nilly.
Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

FAIREY/FAIRY/FAREY/FEARY, LAWSON, CHURCH, BENSON, HALSTEAD from Easton, Ellington, Eynesbury, Gt Catworth, Huntingdon, Spaldwick, Hunts;  Burnley, Lancs;  New Zealand, Australia & US.

HURST, BOLTON,  BUTTERWORTH, ADAMSON, WILD, MCIVOR from Milnrow, Newhey, Oldham & Rochdale, Lancs.

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline macwil

  • RootsChat Senior
  • ****
  • Posts: 285
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Composted Bodies
« Reply #20 on: Thursday 07 February 19 13:32 GMT (UK) »
. . . but I don't think you are actually allowed to scatter ashes willy-nilly.
There are actually very few restrictions regarding the scattering of ashes, most have to do with proximity to drinking water and bathing areas and on someone's private land.

However cremation ashes are highly alkaline, being mainly calcium carbonate with potassium carbonate also in there, so care should be used in disposing of them.
My father's ashes were scattered in a Garden of Remembrance at Gilroes Cemetery, Leicester in 1969, almost 40yrs later we wanted to scatter my mother's ashes in the same place. 'Oh we don't have them any more. The ashes were killing the plants despite the area regularly having manure dug into it' said the Crematorium assistant. 'We removed all the soil into a woodland area which is where the ashes are now scattered' and led us to a nice woodland area and promptly dumped the ashes in a pile on the ground from a small container she was carrying which operated like a bagless vacuum cleaner dust container. 'Don't you bury them?' We asked. 'Oh it's better this way. We can avoid putting too many in the same area if we can see them' was the reply.

So cremation is not necessarily the environmentally friendly option it is often claimed to be.

I think composting will provide a more balanced medium for the environment.
Active links are now (after 13/04/2018) indicated by bold red italics. Just click on them.
The only stupid question is the one not asked

WILSON; Lancs, Lanrks.
BERRY; Lancs.
BORASTON; Salop, Worcs,
TYLER; Salop, Herefords.

Offline Viktoria

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,172
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Composted Bodies
« Reply #21 on: Thursday 07 February 19 15:00 GMT (UK) »
To be truthful,my personal opinion is one which I have hesitated to post as I have no wish to upset anyone.
I do not think it matters really where your ashes are scattered ,I stress that is a personal opinion and I respect different opinions.
It is what comforts those left which matters most along with the wishes of the deceased.
Quite some years ago,people living near Manchester,s Southern cemetery
were worried as the number of cremations was really a lot.
Many people who had been cancer patients were cremated there.
There must have been a report which raised the fears of local residents as to the amount of radiation released during a cremation.
Not sure how that was solved or even disproved.
Some people keep a loved oneís ashes to eventually add theirís to and both be scattered together.
My children asked that their fatherís ashes be kept and mine (eventually)mingled with them and both be blown in the wind off a lovely Shropshire hillside together.
That suits me and is what my husband wanted.
Cremation was at one time thought to be the answer to the crowded graveyard problem but seemingly it is not so simple.
But the reverence for a human body is age old,and that should not be lost,
whatever the religious beliefs ,or none ,of those concerned.
Viktoria.( one foot in the graveó-Oh no, I mean the urn,)

Offline John915

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,285
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Composted Bodies
« Reply #22 on: Thursday 07 February 19 15:09 GMT (UK) »
Good afternoon,

A couple of sites worth reading about cremation. There are no dangers to the enviroment or to humans from cremated remains it seems.

scattering-ashes.co.uk
Cremationsolutions.com

One UK and one US. But there are plenty more online including one for Australia. Plus a very informative wikipedia entry.

John915

Stephens, Fuller, Tedham, Bennett, Ransome (Sussex)
Rider (Fulham)
Stephens (Somerset)
Kentfield (Essex)

Offline bykerlads

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,134
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Composted Bodies
« Reply #23 on: Thursday 07 February 19 19:47 GMT (UK) »
There is a lovely poem by Pam Ayres called Woodland Burial.
Really heartening and uplifting in sad circumstances. And a reference to woodland/natural burials.
Even better when recited by the poet in her own inimitable and kindly accents.

Offline Viktoria

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,172
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Composted Bodies
« Reply #24 on: Thursday 07 February 19 19:55 GMT (UK) »
I have just given a book of her poems to the books in our supermarket which people can take and hopefully leave a donation.For charity.
So I have had to google it ,and yes it really is lovely.
Thanks for reminding me.
Viktoria.

Offline Xinia :)

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 8,076
  • STATIC AVATAR
    • View Profile
Re: Composted Bodies
« Reply #25 on: Thursday 07 February 19 19:59 GMT (UK) »
So   my 6d 

 I havent read previous posts..

BUT how do we know whose ASHES we get????

is the fire!! specifically designed to have a clean box -- ready to collect the remains of each person or is it bung em in and hope for the best?

sorry but I think my Viking ship will be best for me.

xin

Offline bykerlads

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,134
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Composted Bodies
« Reply #26 on: Thursday 07 February 19 21:00 GMT (UK) »
I would like to be buried with my necklace which is made from ancient Roman glass.
That will provide quite a puzzle for any future archeologists who dig up my remains!