Author Topic: Composted Bodies  (Read 991 times)

Offline pinefamily

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Re: Composted Bodies
« Reply #9 on: Tuesday 05 February 19 22:36 GMT (UK) »
And I don't see composting of bodies as being too much of a hurdle for future researchers; there is bound to be some records kept.
The biggest hurdle I see is the anonymous donation of eggs and sperm for childless couples. Let future researchers work through that.  :)
I am Australian, from all the lands I come (my ancestors, at least!)

Pine/Pyne, Dowdeswell, Kempster, Sando/Sandoe/Sandow, Nancarrow, Carrington, Hounslow, Youatt, Richardson, Jarmyn, Oxlade, Coad, Bentham, Holloway, Lindner, Pittaway, and too many others to name.
Devon, Dorset, Gloucs, Cornwall, Yorks, Bucks, Oxfordshire, Wilts, Germany, Sweden, and of course London, to name a few.

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Offline Viktoria

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Re: Composted Bodies
« Reply #10 on: Tuesday 05 February 19 23:18 GMT (UK) »
Ooh donít get me started on THAT.
There is the distinct possibility as far as I can see ,that close relatives could have children together without knowing that they are related.
Think of the sad possibilities.
Viktoria.

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Offline pinefamily

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Re: Composted Bodies
« Reply #11 on: Tuesday 05 February 19 23:27 GMT (UK) »
Kissing cousins?  ;D
I am Australian, from all the lands I come (my ancestors, at least!)

Pine/Pyne, Dowdeswell, Kempster, Sando/Sandoe/Sandow, Nancarrow, Carrington, Hounslow, Youatt, Richardson, Jarmyn, Oxlade, Coad, Bentham, Holloway, Lindner, Pittaway, and too many others to name.
Devon, Dorset, Gloucs, Cornwall, Yorks, Bucks, Oxfordshire, Wilts, Germany, Sweden, and of course London, to name a few.

Offline John915

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Re: Composted Bodies
« Reply #12 on: Wednesday 06 February 19 13:39 GMT (UK) »
Good afternoon,

I've always understood that any bones left unburnt were ground up. These were then added to the ashes which are the bones anyway. As far as I know the soft tissue doesn't leave any ash, but I may be wrong.

John915

Added, surely any burial in a wooden casket, or similar,  composts over the years anyway. This why only bones are found when Time Team are digging up graves.
Stephens, Fuller, Tedham, Bennett, Ransome (Sussex)
Rider (Fulham)
Stephens (Somerset)
Kentfield (Essex)

Offline myluck!

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Re: Composted Bodies
« Reply #13 on: Wednesday 06 February 19 13:50 GMT (UK) »
My sister-in-law has expressed a wish to be placed in a brown bin when she dies - definite laws against this!

However I know some cemeteries that are close to underground water supplies insist on particular types of coffins to prevent the spread of disease. 
Kearney & Bourke/ Johns & Fox/ Mannion & Finan/ Donohoe & Curley
Byrne [Carthy], Keeffe/ Germaine, Butler/ McDermott, Giblin/ Lally, Dolan
Toole, Doran; Dowling, Grogan/ Reilly, Burke; Warren, Kidd [Lawless]/ Smith, Scally; Mangan, Rodgers/ Fahy, Calday; Staunton, Miller
Further generations:
Brophy Coleman Eathorn(e) Fahy Fitzpatrick Geraghty Haverty Keane Keogh Nowlan Rowe Walder

Offline John915

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Re: Composted Bodies
« Reply #14 on: Wednesday 06 February 19 13:56 GMT (UK) »
Back again,

Just done a little research. The human body is primarily water, carbon and ???. Stupid me, forgotten that bit already. During cremation, due to the temperature, all organic matter is vapourised, the water evaporates anyway and the bones burn. After a cooling period the ash is raked out, it all goes through a crusher followed by a magnetic chamber to remove any metal parts. It is then sifted by hand and placed in a container ready for  disposal. The typical male body leaves about 6lb of ash.

John915
Stephens, Fuller, Tedham, Bennett, Ransome (Sussex)
Rider (Fulham)
Stephens (Somerset)
Kentfield (Essex)

Online Erato

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Re: Composted Bodies
« Reply #15 on: Wednesday 06 February 19 14:19 GMT (UK) »
In the end, burial, composting and cremation all have the same result.  The body is decomposed. Complex organic molecules are broken down into CO2 and water which return to the atmosphere.  The mineral elements remain and are returned to the soil from whence they came.  It can be done quickly or slowly; it can be done by fire or by decomposer organisms, but the end products are the same.
Wiltshire:  Banks, Taylor
Somerset:  Duddridge, Richards, Barnard, Pillinger
Gloucestershire:  Barnard, Marsh, Crossman
Bristol:  Banks, Duddridge, Barnard
Down:  Ennis, McGee
Wicklow:  Chapman, Pepper
Wigtownshire:  Logan, Conning
Wisconsin:  Ennis, Chapman, Logan, Ware
Maine:  Ware, Mitchell, Tarr

Offline lydiaann

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Re: Composted Bodies
« Reply #16 on: Wednesday 06 February 19 15:56 GMT (UK) »
I believe that land is for the living and intend to be the first cremation in my family when I eventually go (aged 103 sounds good to me, gives me almost 30 years to do the things I want to do).  However, strangely, I am comforted by visits to the graves of my parents, and my 2 beloved brothers as well as that of my grandparents; I tell them what I have been doing and how much I miss them all.  I even had to apologise to one brother, as the only flowers I could get were pink...not really his colour at all but, as I said to him, they went well with the grey marble of his headstone!
Cravens of Wakefield, Alnwick, Banchory-Ternan
Houghtons and Harrises of Melbourne, Derbyshire
Taylors of Chadderton/Oldham, Lancashire
MacGillivrays of Mull
Macdonalds of Dundee

Offline Viktoria

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Re: Composted Bodies
« Reply #17 on: Wednesday 06 February 19 17:57 GMT (UK) »
Lydian,I mis read the last sentence of your post,an idea came to me.
What if the ashes of someone were incorporated in their headstone which would take up,very little room .
It would have to be a composite material but they would be in there ,,almost like added sand,their name,date etc carved as usual.
In the crematorium wher my F in Lís ashes are there seems to be a new kind  of ashes,actually they look like , oh I am sorry but cat litter.
My Dadís  which we scattered in Belgium were a fine dust.
New process I suppose.
Viktoria.