Author Topic: Gambling in the 1920s  (Read 271 times)

Offline Claire64

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Gambling in the 1920s
« on: Wednesday 06 February 19 14:28 GMT (UK) »
I've come across an article in the Sheffield newspaper where a landlord at a local pub was fined for allowing another man to take bets on his premises.  The article (1929) mentions "bookmaking without a license".  I have tried Googling this but can't sort the wheat from the chaff.
Was gambling actually illegal? when they say a license, were there betting shops or was it allowed on a racecourse only?
The landlord was fined even though both he and the man taking the bets said he knew nothing about it.
I do get off at a tangent when doing my family research - this has nothing at all to do with my family, it wasn't even their pub, they had a different one! - but my enquiring mind gets the better of me.
Pearson (Bradwell Dby & Stocksbridge)
Donkersley
Crawshaw (Bradfield)
Evans (Bradwell Dby and Stocksbridge)
Crossley (Penistone)
Rogers (Nottinghamshire & Stocksbridge)
Bramall (Bradfield/Wadsley)
Walton (Hunshelf)

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Offline iolaus

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Re: Gambling in the 1920s
« Reply #1 on: Wednesday 06 February 19 15:33 GMT (UK) »
Only at racecourses till 1961 (according to wikipedia so make of it as you will)https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bookmaker

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Offline medpat

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Re: Gambling in the 1920s
« Reply #2 on: Wednesday 06 February 19 15:46 GMT (UK) »
My grandfather was a bookies runner (he was over 65).

On lunchtimes he stood on a corner near a large factory not far from where he lived. If we saw him on that corner as we walked pass mum always told us not to talk to him.  ;D

He died aged 69 in 1960.
Lloyd, Paddock, Cooper, Morris, Darby, Rigby, Platt, Armstrong. All based in West Midlands

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Offline Viktoria

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Re: Gambling in the 1920s
« Reply #3 on: Wednesday 06 February 19 16:19 GMT (UK) »
There were back street bookies,all very clandestine and literally business  was done from the Backdoor .

The only time I went  was once when Mum fancied  a horse in The  Grand National .Sheila’s Cottage. Can’t remember if it won.
Sixpence each way,( last of the big spenders my Mum!)
Then betting shops appeared and there was no need for the back street bookies anymore.
Viktoria.


Offline Falkyrn

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Re: Gambling in the 1920s
« Reply #4 on: Wednesday 06 February 19 17:21 GMT (UK) »
From http://www.gordonhouse.org.uk/history-gambling-uk-viewpoint/

Quote
Anti-gambling sentiment grew in the early 1800s due to a series of events including several high-profile betting frauds, corrupt lotteries and a proliferation of literature expounding the immorality of gaming. To address these concerns, Parliament passed the Gaming Act of 1845 and the Betting Act of 1853, which effectively prohibited most avenues for commercialized gambling. On-course betting was still allowed at horse races, but only wealthy citizens could afford to attend these events. Therefore, most gambling activity went to the streets. Although the 1906 Street Betting Act further criminalized gambling in public, enforcement was difficult and ultimately ineffective. Meanwhile, unregulated gambling led to an increase in other crimes.

During the early 1900s, two Royal Commissions on Lotteries and Betting were established to determine how gambling should be regulated to reduce crime and increase government tax revenues. Their recommendations led to new gambling legislation in 1960, which legalized betting in licensed shops under government supervision.
Cuimhnichibh air na daoine bho'n d'thainig sibh

Offline Claire64

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Re: Gambling in the 1920s
« Reply #5 on: Wednesday 06 February 19 19:55 GMT (UK) »
Thanks all!
Pearson (Bradwell Dby & Stocksbridge)
Donkersley
Crawshaw (Bradfield)
Evans (Bradwell Dby and Stocksbridge)
Crossley (Penistone)
Rogers (Nottinghamshire & Stocksbridge)
Bramall (Bradfield/Wadsley)
Walton (Hunshelf)

Offline Kiltpin

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Re: Gambling in the 1920s
« Reply #6 on: Thursday 07 February 19 00:12 GMT (UK) »
(according to wikipedia so make of it as you will)
   

I am a Wikipedia editor and I will tell you what I make of it. 

Wikipedia was based on the 1908 Encyclopaedia Britannica, which was written and complied by professionals and experts in their field. It was discovered in 2008 that over 75% of it was inaccurate, between 10 & 20% was just totally wrong. Distances and populations were just made up.   

If you look at any article you will see in-line citations and references at the bottom of the page. Data is not allowed unless it has been previously promulgated in another source. Original research is forbidden. Reliable 3rd party resources only are used. Some national newspapers are not allowed to be cited a source as they are just not reliable - The Daily Mail and The Mail on Sunday are just two off the top of my head. 

Every time an article is edited various editors are informed. We patrol the page and correct spelling, grammar, remove bias, correct syntax, debate among ourselves for hours on the tone of the article, do endless re-writes and so on, and so on ad infinitum.   

And why do we do this? So people with no understanding and less care can rubbish our work out of hand. What do I make of it? This is what I make of it - If you don't trust Wikipedia, don't give it as a link to another person!
 
Chas

Whannell - Eaton - Jackson
India - Scotland - Australia

Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Gambling in the 1920s
« Reply #7 on: Thursday 07 February 19 02:18 GMT (UK) »
"Peaky Blinders" made a lucrative living from it. Aunt Polly managed the business while her nephews were away fighting WW1. (I know it's fiction but it's based on fact.)

Offline iolaus

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Re: Gambling in the 1920s
« Reply #8 on: Thursday 07 February 19 08:56 GMT (UK) »
Sorry Chas I didn't mean to insult you

I did believe the article (hence why I posted the link) however I have done so before and promptly been rubbished for linking to wikipedia

Great news that you don't allow references from the Mail though, can't believe a word they print