Author Topic: Irish death certificates.  (Read 530 times)

Offline Viktoria

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,282
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Irish death certificates.
« on: Wednesday 20 February 19 23:42 GMT (UK) »
Just thinking of something,during the Irish famine,I wonder if death certificates were issued?
Considering how so many died and the weakened state of the rest of the family ,would they have been able to walk perhaps many miles to register a death?
It is reported that whole families just gave up.
Closed the door of their little cabins and piled turves against the door and lay down and died,whole families together.
So the ruins of houses are probably graves, and in a staunchly Roman Catholic  country must have been distressing to say the least that there  was no service or wake.

Who would register the deaths?
The distances involved even to try and get a meal ticket,were unimaginable .
So the numbers quoted may be seriously fewer than the real cost.
I know records were burned and so even those that were reported may have gone.
Just interested in a shocking event.
Viktoria.

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline Johnf04

  • RootsChat Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 544
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Irish death certificates.
« Reply #1 on: Wednesday 20 February 19 23:48 GMT (UK) »
Civil registration of deaths didn't start in Ireland until 1864...long after the famine.
Farrell  - Ayrshire
Cairns - Ayrshire
McCann - Ayrshire
Brown - Ayrshire
Petty - Yorkshire, Durham
Lucas - Staffordshire, Durham
Whitaker - Yorkshire
Thackrah - Yorkshire
Stephenson - Durham
Marshall - Yorkshire
Walker - Staffordshire, Southland New Zealand
McCullough -  Antrim, Southland New Zealand,
Cavanagh - Galway, Southland New Zealand
Anthony - Tipperary, Southland New Zealand
Bath - Cornwall, Tasmania, Southland
Brungot - Alesund, Norway; Southland
Bonthron - Fifeshire, Southland

RootsChat is the busiest, largest free family history forum site in the country. It is completely free to use. Register now.
Also register instantly with Facebook or Twitter (and other social networks). Start your genealogy search now.


Offline Viktoria

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,282
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Irish death certificates.
« Reply #2 on: Wednesday 20 February 19 23:54 GMT (UK) »
Oh Thank you,I did not know that.

So figures will have been estimated .
Whatever, the numbers are appalling.
Thanks again.
Viktoria.

Offline Skoosh

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 4,432
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Irish death certificates.
« Reply #3 on: Thursday 21 February 19 10:06 GMT (UK) »
Good question Viktoria, the aftermath of this catastrophe be-devils British politics to this day!

Skoosh.

Offline carol8353

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 16,710
  • The grandchildren sitting on a wooden spider!
    • View Profile
Re: Irish death certificates.
« Reply #4 on: Thursday 21 February 19 11:31 GMT (UK) »
As you say they are very religious in Ireland,my husband's parents were from County Clare.
So I very much doubt they buried anyone in the back garden. They would have done their damndest to get them to the local church to give them a proper burial and therefore one would hope that they appear in the burial registers of the day.
Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline Sinann

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 8,556
    • View Profile
Re: Irish death certificates.
« Reply #5 on: Thursday 21 February 19 11:48 GMT (UK) »
This will give you an idea of how low things got with regards to burials.
https://www.libraryireland.com/annals-famine-ireland/manner-of-burying-the-starving.php
You can't fish on a empty stomach so give the man one or two records so he knows how good it tastes.

Offline hallmark

  • -
  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • ****
  • Posts: 13,730
    • View Profile
Re: Irish death certificates.
« Reply #6 on: Thursday 21 February 19 11:51 GMT (UK) »
The biggest killers were Typhus, Cholera so people weren't carried around so if they died in countryside they weren't brought to a town or village where disease might spread.

People moving around often had to bypass villages, towns due to barricades. Wells were guarded day and night. Livestock was brought in at night, dairy herds guarded 24/7.

Plenty of people buried in-situ.
Give a man a record and you feed him for a day.
Teach a man to research, and you feed him for a lifetime.

Offline conahy calling

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,317
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Irish death certificates.
« Reply #7 on: Thursday 21 February 19 17:19 GMT (UK) »
from Atlas of the Great Irish Famine P372

A sailor from the HMS Tartarus delivering a cargo of food to Ballydehob (Co Cork) gave a close up description of what he witnessed:
        The deaths here average 40 or 50 daily: 20 were buried this morning and they were fortunate in getting buried at all.  The people build themselves up into their cabins so that they may die together with their children and not be seen by passers by. 

p375 Skibbereen Co Cork
On 20 Feb 1847 American philanthropist Elihu Burrit visited the town.
"We entered the graveyard, in the midst of which was a small watch-house. This miserable shed had served as a grave where the dying could bury themselves.... And into this horrible den of death, living men, women and children went down to die....."



R.C. parish registers seldom have deaths or burials recorded, most have just baptisms and marriages.

http://xroads.virginia.edu/~hyper/sadlier/irish/Galway.htm   From The Times  8th March 1847

https://www.irishcentral.com/news/one-thousand-famine-victims-found-in-irish-burial-site-132301653-237418841
Link about Kilkenny workhouse burials

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5htYzvdigFA 
1 minute you tube clip about famine mass grave outside Skibbereen Co Cork.




Online Maiden Stone

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,888
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Irish death certificates.
« Reply #8 on: Friday 22 February 19 02:35 GMT (UK) »
This will give you an idea of how low things got with regards to burials.
https://www.libraryireland.com/annals-famine-ireland/manner-of-burying-the-starving.php
See also accounts "Sara's Bed and Burial" and "Death and Burial of Abraham" in chapter 4 and "Burial at Newport" and "Deaths in the Famine" in chapter 7.