Author Topic: occupied ground  (Read 122 times)

Offline Silvercup

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occupied ground
« on: Sunday 24 February 19 23:31 GMT (UK) »
If you read the following in a newspaper article about somebody stealing cabbages (in 1855)

"It was quite clear the robberies had been committed by persons who occupied ground"

What would you take occupied ground to mean? Could it be people living in a gypsy camp?

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Offline Steve G

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Re: occupied ground
« Reply #1 on: Monday 25 February 19 02:45 GMT (UK) »
It would add up that they'd blame Gypsys, regardless. Some things never change.
GAITES (Alverstoke / Bath Pre 1850)
CURTIS (Portsmouth & 1800's Berkshire).
BURGE (Dorset, Somerset and Hampshire)
HUNTLEY (Dorset, Hampshire, Sussex, 'Surroundings')

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Offline Silvercup

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Re: occupied ground
« Reply #2 on: Monday 25 February 19 09:09 GMT (UK) »
It was actually a woman stealing from her father in law, so potentially both were gypsies. I'm researching the idea that this line of my family were Romany and have a few "clues" but nothing conclusive so far.

This is the full article:

Harriet Pearcey, remanded from Staines, for stealing cabbage-greens, was discharged in consequence of Thomas Pearcey, the owner of the greens, not appearing. It appeared that he was a relation to the prisoner. In answer to the magistrates, Sergeant Atter stated that complaints having been made of the robbery of several gardens, he sent a constable in plain clothes to detect the depredators. It was quite clear the robberies had been committed by persons who occupied ground, and this turned out to be the case; but when parties were taken the complainants refused to prosecute. 

So I was interested in this phrase occupied ground and what it meant.