Author Topic: How did they get there?  (Read 666 times)

Offline Andrew Tarr

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How did they get there?
« on: Wednesday 27 February 19 17:29 GMT (UK) »
Not long after his father died, my g-g-grandfather left the family farm near Ashburton in Devon, and took everyone across to Ireland, probably in 1854 when the farm was put up for sale (this was a few years after the famines and mass emigration, so there must have been plenty of farms vacant).  There had been seven children; the eldest (my g-g) married an Irish girl and apparently learnt the language.  He seems to have been the only one to settle - several of the others returned to Devon in the early 1880s.

I was wondering what route they might have taken to reach Midleton in eastern county Cork.  Cork itself is a major port and there are harbours at Youghal, Waterford and Dungarvan, where the one settler died in 1904.  But where to sail from?  Does anyone know what passages there were between the West Country and Ireland in the 1850s ?
Tarr, Tydeman, Liversidge, Bartlett, Young

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Offline BushInn1746

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Re: How did they get there?
« Reply #1 on: Wednesday 27 February 19 18:49 GMT (UK) »
Hello Andrew

You could try the Port of Bristol (the City of Bristol has its own Archives with limited emigration items), if they lived in the South-west of England. That would be my first 'port of call' for enquiries (if you pardon the pun  ;D ) as to whether anything local was kept and where held.

But smaller harbours were navigating boats along the coast to other Ports, before crossing the sea.

TNA, Kew
Emigration Fact Sheets
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/help-with-your-research/research-guides/emigration/

Many Government Files mainly relate to Policy, but the PRO TNA is a most interesting place if you have stacks of time and can get there.

Media File
https://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/emigration-records/

Search Emigration & 1854
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/results/r?_aq=emigration&_dss=range&_sd=1854&_ed=1854&_ro=any&_st=adv

and
Search emigration & Ireland & 1854 ...
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/results/r?_dss=range&_sd=1854&_ed=1854&_ro=any&_q=emigration+Ireland

These are all likely to be original documents at TNA and will require a READERS TICKET application and recent Proofs of ID and Address (See their "Visit Us" page). Contact other Archives re access requirements.


However, I was led to believe by TNA, Kew, that many of the early government Emigration Registers are gone.


Surviving Crew Muster Sheets Bound
Surviving Muster Sheets that were saved for Merchant Crews (Bristol search in BT 98, other Ports available), see also CUST series (Customs)
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/results/r?_ep=Bristol&_cr=BT%2098&_dss=range&_ro=any&_st=adv

Bit unusual for a Passenger to be listed with the Crew names, but I have seen them.


Also worth remembering that many inland rivers and waterways were more navigable further inland in time gone by, than they are now.


I do know that in c.1780 there were sailings with cargo from Liverpool to Waterford & Belfast
Reply 53
https://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?topic=731922.msg6535046#msg6535046


If the last point of departure from the English Coast was Liverpool, there might be some interesting items at the Maritime Museum, Liverpool (if documents not online).
http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/maritime/archive/

This company (who also do paid research) have put a lot of general useful links on their site, for those interested in Merchant Shipping.
http://www.maritimearchives.co.uk/

Also Lloyds of London Registers of Vessels (many online) are scanning their Archives.

Also National Maritime Museum Archive, Greenwich.

British Library, UK.

Other smaller Coastal places have Museums with Maritime pieces.

There are others on here with a deep interest in Shipping.

Some travelled on chartered boats and vessels from smaller harbours, if a group emigrated together.

Mark
"George HOOD of Selby" Before 1812?

Born about 1785 (Yorkshire per 1841 Census)

Married Sarah RUSSELL at Selby 1815 newspaper - "both of that place".

Buried in the Quaker Burial Ground at Selby as "Not in Membership" in 1845, aged 60 years.

George HOOD of Selby was refused Membership of the Quakers in 1836.

Elected Overseer of the Poor of Selby in 1838.

Had both known (Selby) and unknown (some not stated 1846) property interests.

Possible (but unknown) links to COOK and/or PEARSON names.

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Offline Steve G

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Re: How did they get there?
« Reply #2 on: Wednesday 27 February 19 23:28 GMT (UK) »
 :o Forgive me, but; Standing Ovation!

What an incredibly generous response!
GAITES (Alverstoke / Bath Pre 1850)
CURTIS (Portsmouth & 1800's Berkshire).
BURGE (Dorset, Somerset and Hampshire)
HUNTLEY (Dorset, Hampshire, Sussex, 'Surroundings')

Offline Andrew Tarr

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Re: How did they get there?
« Reply #3 on: Thursday 28 February 19 09:39 GMT (UK) »
Thanks for all that, Mark.  I wasn't hoping to find a record of their travel, more a general idea of how such a journey might have happened.  By 1854 railway travel was expanding - Ashburton was not yet connected, but their farm was only a few miles from the main line at Newton Abbot.  I guess the nearest port would have been Exeter, but Bristol or even Highbridge on the north coast might have been a possibility.  I can't see them going as far as Liverpool or south Wales somehow.  The family wills suggest that they were well-off enough, but that kind of travel would have cost; I don't think they saw themselves as true emigrants.
Tarr, Tydeman, Liversidge, Bartlett, Young

Offline mazi

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Re: How did they get there?
« Reply #4 on: Thursday 28 February 19 17:20 GMT (UK) »
Bideford  looks a possibility, wiki tells me Canadian emigrants left from there in the 1800s.
There donít seem to be many ports on the north devon coast

I doubt they would have gone from any south coast port as the journey round Cornwall would have lengthened the voyage considerably

Mike

Offline Andrew Tarr

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Re: How did they get there?
« Reply #5 on: Thursday 28 February 19 18:23 GMT (UK) »
Bideford  looks a possibility, wiki tells me Canadian emigrants left from there in the 1800s.
There donít seem to be many ports on the north Devon coast

I doubt they would have gone from any south coast port as the journey round Cornwall would have lengthened the voyage considerably.
 
Thanks, Mike, I had forgotten about Bideford, but Barnstaple is close by, and Watchet has been a port for centuries.  There remains the question of how they travelled; without knowing exactly when that was, it remains hard to guess.  A new railway reached Barnstaple from Exeter in summer 1854 (so that seems just possible), and Bideford the following year, but a railway didn't get to Watchet until 1862.
Tarr, Tydeman, Liversidge, Bartlett, Young

Offline Skoosh

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Re: How did they get there?
« Reply #6 on: Thursday 28 February 19 20:53 GMT (UK) »
Millford Haven?

Skoosh.

Offline Andrew Tarr

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Re: How did they get there?
« Reply #7 on: Thursday 28 February 19 21:03 GMT (UK) »
Milford Haven?

No railway there either in 1854.  I think a likely plan would have been to cross the Bristol Channel, perhaps from Highbridge, to Cardiff or Swansea, and get another ship there.
Tarr, Tydeman, Liversidge, Bartlett, Young

Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: How did they get there?
« Reply #8 on: Thursday 28 February 19 21:07 GMT (UK) »
I would also favour Bristol.
Railway reached Anglesey in 1848. Was Holyhead an option?
Irish Genealogy Toolkit has pages on emigration. The section on Britain has a bit about migration routes.
https://www.irish-genealogy-toolkit.com    Emigration is on Genealogy tab on home page. There's a ship advert.
They may have gone to Ireland by packet steamer.
Expansion of steamship travel and competition between companies reduced fares. Travel between Britain and Ireland became very cheap.
They might have bought 3rd class train tickets.
Search for newspaper adverts for sailings to Ireland from ports on your shortlist.
Edit. Bristol had an Irish population of long-standing.
There was a tradition of Munster people as seasonal agricultural workers in Britain.