Author Topic: Cheshire parish entry  (Read 198 times)

Offline bbart

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Cheshire parish entry
« on: Saturday 09 March 19 04:52 GMT (UK) »
This is only for curiosity, as I ran across this entry while looking for something else.

I'm seeing:
Samuel Jobson drownd in Smallwood
John Morris drownd in Smallwood
goth the (a good OR above) horse & all togather in one pitt.


Is he saying a horse was buried with the drowned men?

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Offline horselydown86

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Re: Cheshire parish entry
« Reply #1 on: Saturday 09 March 19 05:07 GMT (UK) »
I'm sure it is:  both the above horse & all togather in one pitt

I wonder if they were small boys riding on one horse and got into trouble in a bog.

To answer your question - it's hard to form any other interpretation than that they did bury the horse with the two of them.  They had to bury the horse somewhere, of course.

I don't know what the Church's position is on consecrated ground and horses?

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Offline bbart

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Re: Cheshire parish entry
« Reply #2 on: Saturday 09 March 19 05:14 GMT (UK) »
Thanks for the insight on this.  Sad occasion, whatever happened.
That's an interesting point about consecrated grounds and horses.  I did run into a burial where the horse of the deceased was buried "nearby", which I took to mean away from the human graves.




Offline bbart

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Re: Cheshire parish entry
« Reply #3 on: Saturday 09 March 19 05:58 GMT (UK) »
This old book on google says horses can't be buried on consecrated ground.

Maybe the "pitt" was on the very edge of the cemetery, with boys in the cemetery, and the horse technically off the cemetery (if it was even consecrated wherever they were buried.)

Offline ShaunJ

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Re: Cheshire parish entry
« Reply #4 on: Saturday 09 March 19 09:20 GMT (UK) »
Quote
goth the (a good OR above)

"both the above"
UK Census info. Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline Raybistre

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Re: Cheshire parish entry
« Reply #5 on: Saturday 09 March 19 13:31 GMT (UK) »
 I don't think the reference is to the burial of the men and a horse but to the manner of their death. The Pit was most probably left after the extraction of limestone which I believe this area was noted for.
Maybe still being worked. Maybe a sudden inrush of water or if the pit was flooded maybe the horse became stuck and the men drowned trying to get it out.
Ray

Online arthurk

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Re: Cheshire parish entry
« Reply #6 on: Saturday 09 March 19 14:05 GMT (UK) »
My first thought was that they'd all died together.

I tried to find the entry to see what was written over to the right. It's from Astbury BTs, and the writing is a place - of residence, presumably. What I found interesting was that John Morris's burial is recorded twice: as shown above on 24 Mar 1770, and again on 25 Mar 1770:
Researching among others:
Bartle, Bilton, Campbell, Craven, Emmott, Harcourt, Hirst, Kellet(t), Kennedy,
Meaburn, Mennile/Meynell, Metcalf(e), Palliser, Robinson, Rutter, Shipley, Stow, Wilkinson

Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline bbart

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Re: Cheshire parish entry
« Reply #7 on: Saturday 09 March 19 18:03 GMT (UK) »
Thank you all for your thoughts on this. 

When reading "both the above horse & all togather in one pitt" in a burial entry, I did take it to mean it was a burial entry for all of them, but ArthurK's find of a second burial entry does open the possibility that the entry was more of a "how and where" they died, and not the actual burial information. 
The old newspapers shed no light on this, so I guess whether it was two fellows and a horse in the wrong place at the wrong time, or a workplace accident, we will never know.

Thanks again for your time!