Author Topic: Thomas Cubitt's Pimlico  (Read 347 times)

Offline Les P Davies

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Thomas Cubitt's Pimlico
« on: Tuesday 02 April 19 12:38 BST (UK) »
We are travelling to the UK in April this year and are concluding our time there with a 5-night stay in London. I hope to explore Pimlico, where my emigrant great grandfather, Thomas Davies, was born in 1829 and lived with his parents and siblings at 9 Commercial Road (now Ebury Bridge Road).

As he and his father (also Thomas) were in the employ of Thomas Cubitt. Does anyone have any suggestions about any things to view in Pimlico specifically connected to Thomas Cubitt eg. the location and any remnants of his Yard and Workshops between Lupus Street and the River Thames. Also any mid-19th C landmarks.

From recent photos of Ebury Bridge Road, it appears that there may still be 2-storey Victorian row houses along that street; if they date from the time of Cubitt’s development of Pimlico, then I might be able to view houses that my great great grandfather helped to build.

Thanks for any advice/suggestions that locals might be able to provide.

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Offline Ruskie

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Re: Thomas Cubitt's Pimlico
« Reply #1 on: Tuesday 02 April 19 14:28 BST (UK) »
Welcome to rootschat Les.

You can compare the then and now on the following maps:

Commercial Road:
https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/side-by-side/#zoom=18&lat=51.4895&lon=-0.1505&layers=168&right=BingHyb

and a little further along to Lupus Street:
https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/side-by-side/#zoom=18&lat=51.4877&lon=-0.1399&layers=168&right=BingHyb

Use scroll and zoom to move around.

You can see the area is much changed, though there are pockets of older buildings. I can't offer any advice on places to visit in the area. I would probably just try to soak up the atmosphere and try to use my imagination about what it may have been like for Thomas back in the 1800s.

I will see if I can find a contemporary map which features any Cubitt buildings.

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Offline Ruskie

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Re: Thomas Cubitt's Pimlico
« Reply #2 on: Tuesday 02 April 19 14:41 BST (UK) »
No mention of anything related to Cubitts on this 1868 Weller map:
http://london1868.com/weller64.htm

What sort of business was Cubitts? I can see a distiller on an earlier map but no other businesses between Lupus St and the river. Presumably you have found reference somewhere of the location of Cubitts between Lupus St and the Thames?

Online Mart 'n' Al

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Re: Thomas Cubitt's Pimlico
« Reply #3 on: Tuesday 02 April 19 14:42 BST (UK) »
Hello again Les. You've probably thought of this but I'll mention it anyway. Have you used Google Street View just to familiarise yourself with the area before you arrive? There are some magnificent streets there and it is very peaceful, as it isn't really much of a tourist attraction, despite being 5 or 10 minutes walk from Victoria Station.

Martin
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Names:
Loughborough and Loughbrough, (London, Hull, Pirton, Durham & Hartlepool);
Watson, (Bedlington, Jarrow & Hartlepool);
Ballard & Glassop (E. London); 
Leggett (Corton, Scarborough, Hartlepool); 
Young, Adamson & Wilson, (Hartlepool). 

I use GRAMPS v5.0 software. 

My ancestors are probably turning in their graves, not that I can actually find any of them.

Offline Ruskie

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Re: Thomas Cubitt's Pimlico
« Reply #4 on: Tuesday 02 April 19 14:48 BST (UK) »
Added: I re-read your post and note that you mention housing. Cubitts were builders?


Online stanmapstone

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Online CarolA3

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Re: Thomas Cubitt's Pimlico
« Reply #6 on: Tuesday 02 April 19 14:51 BST (UK) »
Thomas Cubitt was a major builder in London and elsewhere.  Here's some background:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Cubitt

Enjoy your trip :)

Carol
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Offline Ruskie

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Re: Thomas Cubitt's Pimlico
« Reply #7 on: Tuesday 02 April 19 14:51 BST (UK) »
Here is an earlier1827  map which may be of interest:
https://iiif.lib.harvard.edu/manifests/view/ids:8982548
Note that Lupus St was then called Cross Lane.

Offline Ruskie

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Re: Thomas Cubitt's Pimlico
« Reply #8 on: Tuesday 02 April 19 14:55 BST (UK) »
Thomas Cubitt was a major builder in London and elsewhere.  Here's some background:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Cubitt

Enjoy your trip :)

Carol

So Les will be looking for grand structures rather than modest terrace houses.  :) The Wikipedia article mentions several of his buildings which still stand and would be well worth a visit.