Author Topic: Interpretation of an abreviation Please  (Read 222 times)

Offline Fresh Fields

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Interpretation of an abreviation Please
« on: Sunday 14 April 19 06:18 BST (UK) »
Hello.

Below is a clip from a double page of entries attached to an 1800’s title deed.

Each line represents an instrument number and date, the abbreviated form of Grant; Mortgage; or Reconveyance, and the party’s involved.

In the case of the Recon., lines they are followed by the notation full - - [ abbreviation ??]

Is the legal terminology “full and sufficient” when acknowledging the mortgage has been repaid, and thereby cancelling that instrument number.

It’s the only assumption that I can think of at this time. Suggestions appreciated.

Alan.
Early Settlers & Heritage. Family History.

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Offline horselydown86

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Re: Interpretation of an abreviation Please
« Reply #1 on: Sunday 14 April 19 07:47 BST (UK) »
I think you are right.  It looks (particularly the last two) like -

...full & sufft

- with the ampersand running into the s.

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Offline Craclyn

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Re: Interpretation of an abreviation Please
« Reply #2 on: Sunday 14 April 19 08:11 BST (UK) »
Sufficient
Crackett, Cracket, Webb, Turner, Henderson, Murray, Carr, Stavers, Thornton, Oliver, Davis, Hall, Anderson, Bainbridge, Charlton, Chator, Corbett, Coxon, Davis, Dow, Farside, Garden, Gowans, Harmsworth, Hedley, Hunter, Ironside, Johnson, Laidler, Mason, Miller, Milne, Moreis, Nesbitt, Newton, Parkinson, Piery, Reay, Reed, Read, Reid, Robinson, Ruddiman, Smith, Tait, Thompson, Watson, Wilson, Young

Offline Fresh Fields

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Re: Interpretation of an abreviation Please
« Reply #3 on: Sunday 14 April 19 09:59 BST (UK) »
Thank you.

With no break following the &, I began to second guess myself. Trying to think what legal expression may have been used.

Even the mort for mortgage could throw the novice. Interesting to to see 10% being the interest rate in 1878 on what today could be called a 1st mortgage, registered against a substantial feehold title. Further up the page, two years prior, and it was set at 6 1/2 % pa.

Alan.
Early Settlers & Heritage. Family History.

Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Interpretation of an abreviation Please
« Reply #4 on: Sunday 14 April 19 21:28 BST (UK) »
Interesting to to see 10% being the interest rate in 1878 on what today could be called a 1st mortgage, registered against a substantial feehold title. Further up the page, two years prior, and it was set at 6 1/2 % pa.
I looked at tables of historical interest rates yesterday in connection with another RC enquiry relating to early 19thC. Rates were stable at 4% or 5% for almost a century until around 1820.