Author Topic: RUSH PEELER  (Read 262 times)

Offline CassieP

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RUSH PEELER
« on: Monday 15 April 19 10:44 BST (UK) »
Hi  Please does anyone know about this occupation found for a lady on the 1861 census - rush peeler.  She lived in central London.  I'm assuming it is preparing rushes to make baskets and mats - but perhaps there is more to it?  Many thanks 


Oh ... since posting this I found it has already been discussed here, also that the soft inner part of rushes were used to make candles, but if anyone can enlarge on this it would be great!

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Online KGarrad

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Re: RUSH PEELER
« Reply #1 on: Monday 15 April 19 11:05 BST (UK) »
It's also a croquet term! ;D ;D

When you hit your ball into another ball, and at the same time sending said ball through it's scoring hoop.

Sorry! I know it's off topic but, as a croquet player myself, I couldn'd resist ;)
Garrad (Suffolk, Essex, Somerset), Crocker (Somerset), Vanstone (Devon, Jersey), Sims (Wiltshire), Bridger (Kent)

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Offline CassieP

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Re: RUSH PEELER
« Reply #2 on: Monday 15 April 19 11:10 BST (UK) »
Thanks - you never know when bits of information like that might come in useful!  :D

Online stanmapstone

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Re: RUSH PEELER
« Reply #3 on: Monday 15 April 19 11:32 BST (UK) »
From a Dictionary of Occupational Terms
Mapstone, Mapston.
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Offline CassieP

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Re: RUSH PEELER
« Reply #4 on: Monday 15 April 19 11:36 BST (UK) »
Thanks - so it could be basket making or rush candle making.

Online stanmapstone

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Re: RUSH PEELER
« Reply #5 on: Monday 15 April 19 11:44 BST (UK) »
Mapstone, Mapston.
Census Information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline CassieP

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Re: RUSH PEELER
« Reply #6 on: Monday 15 April 19 11:51 BST (UK) »
Thank you  :)

Offline Viktoria

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Re: RUSH PEELER
« Reply #7 on: Monday 15 April 19 16:01 BST (UK) »
The centre of rush stalks is very pithy, I wonder if the outer “ skin “ is peeled off so the rushes  can be used as wicks in small oil lamps,”rush lights”?
Having said that they would be very delicate.
 Just a thought.
Viktoria.


Just looked it up and yes rush lights were peeled rushes.
V.

Offline CassieP

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Re: RUSH PEELER
« Reply #8 on: Monday 15 April 19 16:07 BST (UK) »
Hi Viktoria   Yes, you are right, I've found information on it now.  The outer skin was peeled off, leaving a narrow strip to keep the rush straight.  They were soaked in fat (often mutton fat) to make rush lights.  I think they were also used as wicks for candles. 

http://www.victorianweb.org/technology/domestic/1.html