Author Topic: Ideas wanted on technical mapping and formats.  (Read 236 times)

Offline Althea7

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Ideas wanted on technical mapping and formats.
« on: Monday 15 April 19 14:03 BST (UK) »
I have a lot of members of one family who lived in central Manchester from around 1830 to the 1870's, most of them in the Ancoats area.  I want to make a list of all the addresses given on records of births, deaths, marriages and residences, and gravestones or burial spots if I can find them, and plot them on a map, which I can have on my computer and upload to my Ancestry family tree, maybe under Media.  Maybe I can even take photographs of the streets where they lived and the actual addresses, or what is there now, and somehow link this to the map and the people.

I have no idea how to do this.  Maybe I could print off a Google map and manually plot the addresses, and then upload that back to my computer and have that on the Internet.  There are problems to that as I might not get enough detail of the individual streets in the size of map even for Ancoats, where most of these ancestors lived, and probably not combined with a map that goes out as far as Salford.  Is there any way to do all of this online, and so it looks really clear and professional?  What would be the best way to link all this to my Ancestry family tree?  Or should I try to make a separate format for this family and just concentrate on them, to present all the information I have about this one family?  What is the best format to do this in?

Another thought is that maybe I am trying to re-invent the wheel by taking street photographs myself, and maybe I can just enter the addresses into Google Street View?  Is there any advantage in taking photographs myself?  I am wondering if just to use my simple small camera, or drag an SLR along for better photographs?

Has anybody else here tried anything like this?

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Online KGarrad

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Re: Ideas wanted on technical mapping and formats.
« Reply #1 on: Monday 15 April 19 14:23 BST (UK) »
On Google Maps, if you click on the 3 lines symbol (the "hamburger"!) next to the search places box, you can select "Your Places".

You can then ., or embed it.

I've done this for some friends who were visiting Bristol, and I mapped Real Ale pubs, hotels and some places of interest.
Then I shared it, and they used it on mobile phones (I think!).
Garrad (Suffolk, Essex, Somerset), Crocker (Somerset), Vanstone (Devon, Jersey), Sims (Wiltshire), Bridger (Kent)

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Offline Erato

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Re: Ideas wanted on technical mapping and formats.
« Reply #2 on: Monday 15 April 19 14:27 BST (UK) »
I've done this on a larger scale with the precise location of farms, using Google Earth.  You could do the same thing with urban locations.
Wiltshire:  Banks, Taylor
Somerset:  Duddridge, Richards, Barnard, Pillinger
Gloucestershire:  Barnard, Marsh, Crossman
Bristol:  Banks, Duddridge, Barnard
Down:  Ennis, McGee
Wicklow:  Chapman, Pepper
Wigtownshire:  Logan, Conning
Wisconsin:  Ennis, Chapman, Logan, Ware
Maine:  Ware, Mitchell, Tarr

Online cristeen

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Re: Ideas wanted on technical mapping and formats.
« Reply #3 on: Monday 15 April 19 15:04 BST (UK) »
I've not tried this on such a great scale as you intend but I have used screen shots of street maps pasted into paint and then added text boxes and crosses or spots to show relevant residences. I also use Google street view to capture images of the buildings, if they still exist. It's also worth using a combination of Google images, Rightmove sold history and Zoopla for the address, sales particulars and images from them hang around on the web for ages & I've found some great interior & exterior  images of ancestors homes
Newson, Steavenson, Walker, Taylor, Dobson, Gardner, Clark, Wilson, Smith, Crossland, Goldfinch, Burnett, Hebdon, Peers, Strother, Askew, Bower, Beckwith, Patton, White, Turner, Nelson, Gilpin, Tomlinson, Thompson, Spedding, Wilkes, Carr, Butterfield, Ormandy, Wilkinson, Cocking, Glover, Pennington, Bowker, Kitching, Langhorn, Haworth, Kirkham.

Offline Erato

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Re: Ideas wanted on technical mapping and formats.
« Reply #4 on: Monday 15 April 19 16:39 BST (UK) »
Once you have the locations marked and saved, it's easy to zoom in and use the clipper tool to capture the bits that you want and then paste the images into a document.

This is my gg-grandfather's farm as it is today and next door is gg-uncle Anthony's place.  They were there in the 1830s to the 1860s and the original houses are long gone so the street view is not very useful in this case.
Wiltshire:  Banks, Taylor
Somerset:  Duddridge, Richards, Barnard, Pillinger
Gloucestershire:  Barnard, Marsh, Crossman
Bristol:  Banks, Duddridge, Barnard
Down:  Ennis, McGee
Wicklow:  Chapman, Pepper
Wigtownshire:  Logan, Conning
Wisconsin:  Ennis, Chapman, Logan, Ware
Maine:  Ware, Mitchell, Tarr

Online BenRalph

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Re: Ideas wanted on technical mapping and formats.
« Reply #5 on: Tuesday 16 April 19 07:22 BST (UK) »
This is something I too would like to do with my family in Leeds. I've an Excel file with all the addresses but would like to view the map of the areas to see how close they lived.

Offline Ruskie

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Re: Ideas wanted on technical mapping and formats.
« Reply #6 on: Tuesday 16 April 19 09:30 BST (UK) »
This is something I too would like to do with my family in Leeds. I've an Excel file with all the addresses but would like to view the map of the areas to see how close they lived.

This may or may not give the detail you need, nor be in the right time frame:
https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/side-by-side/#zoom=14.729073765860516&lat=53.8011&lon=-1.5331&layers=168&right=BingHyb

You can zoom in and out, and scroll around the map.

It might be useful to use google maps as a guide then locate the streets on the NLS map, then view the side by side to compare the then and now.  ;) Sometimes street names change or streets of houses are demolished so keep that in mind.  :)

Offline pharmaT

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Re: Ideas wanted on technical mapping and formats.
« Reply #7 on: Tuesday 16 April 19 09:47 BST (UK) »
I love sitting with Old maps and modern maps and trying to work out where my ancestors lived and what I looks like now.  One of mine lived next door to where the Usher Hall is now.  When she lived there she was surrounded by fields and it was outside the City of Edinburgh, now it is very much in the city.
Campbell, Dunn, Dickson, Fell, Forest, Norie, Pratt, Somerville, Thompson, Tyler among others

Offline Ruskie

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Re: Ideas wanted on technical mapping and formats.
« Reply #8 on: Tuesday 16 April 19 10:00 BST (UK) »
I love sitting with Old maps and modern maps and trying to work out where my ancestors lived and what I looks like now.  One of mine lived next door to where the Usher Hall is now.  When she lived there she was surrounded by fields and it was outside the City of Edinburgh, now it is very much in the city.

Itís great fun I agree.  :)
as well as challenging and educational ....