Author Topic: Cloud storage of family history, too hard for the target audience?  (Read 1104 times)

Offline majm

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Re: Cloud storage of family history, too hard for the target audience?
« Reply #27 on: Tuesday 30 April 19 16:17 BST (UK) »
I am still struggling to see what you are hoping to achieve here PaulMcEvoy. You seem to be determined to attack everyone who offers you advice.
Why do you want to force everyone in your family to use one mode of communication? People have different skills, interests and needs. If you want to reach out to your family and get them interested or educate them in some way about the errors in published articles then the only way you are likely to succeed is to adapt your method of communication to meet the requirements of those you want to reach. There is no one size fits all and if there was it is highly unlikely that cloud storage would be the solution.

Yes,  spot on.

I was born in 1947,  I have been actively involved in family history since childhood,  so I have seen many changes in the ways to research,  the ways to record that research,  the availability of material to research, and the formats to store that research.  It is only in recent years that the concept of seeking out the living relatives to exhibit that research to them and to expect them to flock to hear, see and even  promote the researcher has emerged. To me,  the basic tenet was to seek out information about our deceased ancestors and if along the way we met someone else who was also researching same deceased person,  to willingly share info and conundrums  with them.   

On the other hand,  I do a newsletter every quarter to many of my known living relatives .... my scandal sheet .... gossip,  snippets on 19th century families,  photos,  etc .  This is a pdf,  it goes  as email attachment.  The eldest person receiving email was born 1915.  He has had email since 1992.  He ditched his cheque book last century,  and does his bookkeeping all online.  He does not trust cloud.  And .... well .... Metadata is not for him. 

Family history booklets,  essays,  papers,  and electronic storage devices etc can still be lodged with family history groups or with archives organisations here in New South  Wales, Australia.

JM.
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Offline Mart 'n' Al

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Re: Cloud storage of family history, too hard for the target audience?
« Reply #28 on: Wednesday 01 May 19 17:17 BST (UK) »
As an aside, I first heard the expression "the cloud" in 1990, working for the data network part of General Electric, where it referred to the entire part of their global network, an extension of old fashioned time sharing.

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Offline Paul McEvoy

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Re: Cloud storage of family history, too hard for the target audience?
« Reply #29 on: Thursday 02 May 19 08:07 BST (UK) »
I had signed off from this thread. But I received a personal message from Martin which I attempted to reply to but was defeated by the personal messaging system despite numerous attempts.

Thankyou Guy for your very considered post.

You ask me to provide a link to my history. Others have talked about security of their material and I hope you can understand why I do not wish to open up my files to strangers, especially considering some of the posts made here.

But I have not had any technical problems at all. I have had feedback from people who have accessed the files successfully. The links are short enough for a single line. Viewers are presented with a file and a supporting folder on a standard cloud server - much as you get if you download a webpage. Clicking on the file will open it in a browser. It is not technically demanding. But I know from sending email links on unrelated matters that clicking on them does not always work for all the recipients. They work for some but not for others. I assume it is related to the email server they use.

The alternative to clicking on the link is of course to cut and paste the link to the address line of a browser. In my experience that always works. But I suspect that some people don't know that. They click. It doesn't work. They give up. They feel I have sent them a dud. Or they may worry that it is their fault and they don't want to admit ignorance.

So in future I am going to include a file "What to do if clicking on the link doesn't work".

But it goes beyond that. My files are more like magazine articles with genuine human interest even for non-family members. I am confident if people just start to browse they will be sucked in. But there is a general reluctance to try. I put this down to a stereotype of 'family history'. Because genealogy has become popular they assume that I am sending them a detailed family tree type of history. This is not to deride what genealogists do. I too am interested in my family tree and like to look up my ancestors from time to time.

People here have said I can't force others to read the history. No, but I intend to do my best to persuade them.

An alternative to using cloud storage is to use a restricted access website. But I understand the restriction occurs via an email link which means the problem will be the same. A website is also more work. But if others have tried both I would love to hear of their experience.

You mention cloud servers going down. But the original files which I hold (yes, with backups) will always be there. Everything can be reconstructed. Nothing is perfect. After all hard-copy records can be consumed in a fire.

You mention "many of the digital professionals I talk to prefer books for long term storage than digital and many print online records to read rather than read them online."

Do you remember the old joke "A pessimist is someone who lives with an optimist"? I am probably older that the average here but I believe I can objectively straddle both sides of the traditional / modern debate. I still read newspapers, magazines and have a library book out right now. Among my two millennial late-nesters I am constantly defending traditional ways versus digital and online. Here it is the opposite. I can acknowledge there are lots of good things about traditional ways. I use those arguments against my children all the time. But no one here acknowledges any of the advantages of the digital and online. They are not succeeding because of prejudice. It is because they offer genuine functional advantages.

I imagine some members have family history albums brimming with information which are works of art and a joy to view and hold. No digital version could compete with that. (If you want to view them though you'd better get along with the owner, 'cause he ain't gonna let you in otherwise). But each still sits in one bookcase / house / town / state / country. The online digital version can be viewed by anyone (approved), anywhere with an internet connected computer.