Author Topic: Battle of Killiecrankie - Francis Ross  (Read 2201 times)

Offline txrnlee

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Re: Battle of Killiecrankie - Francis Ross
« Reply #9 on: Monday 20 July 20 01:50 BST (UK) »
I am a McCord family historian searching for clarification and support for family tradition that holds a similar contradiction. Our family, known to be Presbyterian after emigration, is said to have been part of the Battle of Killiekrankie as part of the Jacobite support. Therein lies the question about a Presbyterian supporting a Catholic uprising. I am most interested to know if you have garnered any information to support this apparent contradiction. I read Skoosh reply and would like to dig deeper into the history of Presbyterians fighting for an asserted Catholic cause. Suffice it to say, it expect there is more to the story than what lies of the surface. Thank you for entertaining my inquiry.

Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Battle of Killiecrankie - Francis Ross
« Reply #10 on: Monday 20 July 20 13:27 BST (UK) »
Welcome to RootsChat.
As the earlier reply by Skoosh explained, it was not a Catholic uprising for a Catholic cause. It's far more complex.
This article in Encyclopaedia Britannica explains the context. "The Revolution of 1688"
https://www.britannica.com/place/United-Kingdom/The-Revolution-of-1688#483189
The struggle for the crowns of England, Ireland and Scotland between King James and his son-in-law, Prince William of Orange, was a small part of a major war between European rulers which eventually spread to overseas colonies in the Americas, India and Africa. King Louis of France, whose ally was King James, was on one side. Practically everyone else who mattered was on the other side, opposing the expansionist ambitions of King Louis. Opposing rulers included Emperor Leopold (Catholic), King of Spain (Catholic), the Pope (Catholic, obviously), King of Sweden and Stadtholder William of Orange.
The League of Augsburg also known as The Grand Alliance was formed in 1686 by Emperor Leopold and kings of Spain, Sweden + others.  England joined after William became king. The War of the Grand Alliance (aka War of the League of Augsburg) was fought 1689-97. William commanded the Alliance armies  at some major battles on the European Continent.
Peace was short-lived. The War of Spanish Succession was a continuation of the struggle for power in Europe between the Bourbon (French kings) and the Hapsburg dynasties.
 
 An article from an Irish viewpoint about papal contribution: "Why did Pope Innocent XI support the Orange?" by Joe McVeigh, 11th July 2017
www.judecollins.com/2017/07/pope-innocent-xi-support-orange-joe-mcveigh/
Apparently there was a painting of Pope Innocent blessing King William's army. It used to hang in Stormont (the seat of N.I. Parliament, now N.I. Assembly) until someone objected and vandalised it.

History was never simple.
Cowban

Offline BushInn1746

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Re: Battle of Killiecrankie - Francis Ross
« Reply #11 on: Sunday 26 July 20 09:14 BST (UK) »
I am a McCord family historian searching for clarification and support for family tradition that holds a similar contradiction. Our family, known to be Presbyterian after emigration, is said to have been part of the Battle of Killiekrankie as part of the Jacobite support. Therein lies the question about a Presbyterian supporting a Catholic uprising. I am most interested to know if you have garnered any information to support this apparent contradiction. I read Skoosh reply and would like to dig deeper into the history of Presbyterians fighting for an asserted Catholic cause. Suffice it to say, it expect there is more to the story than what lies of the surface. Thank you for entertaining my inquiry.

In Yorkshire, England in the 17th Century and at Selby, Yorkshire by 1690 there was already a Presbyterian Chapel and the earliest surviving Baptism Register in 1797 says the chapel was English Presbyterian. English Presbyterianism was supported in Yorkshire by Lady Hewley (Sarah) who were Protestant Dissenters 17th Cent.

Inconsistencies and seeming contradictions often require detailed searching in archives, with the hope of finding a document mentioning an ancestor inside, only to find that type of document does not, or may have not have survived.

Mark


Offline Skoosh

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Re: Battle of Killiecrankie - Francis Ross
« Reply #12 on: Sunday 26 July 20 12:28 BST (UK) »
The Clan Ross were generally Presbyterians but in the '45 their chief, Ross of Pitcalnie, raised men for the prince. "Jumping the dyke!" was not uncommon amongst the chiefs, Cromartie & particularly, Lord Lovat amongst them. He was an Episcopalian, Presbyterian & a Catholic by turn! The greatest Lord Lovat that ever was, as he modestly maintained! He was probably right ;D

https://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/person/mp02804/simon-fraser-11th-lord-lovat/

 Hereditary animosities & family ties were more important than religion in Highland politics. Lovat's elder brother died of wounds received at Killiecrankie so young Simon rose to prominence, his principal enemies were the expansionist Mackenzie's & the Murray's of Atholl who had a forfeited Jacobite duke at their head & his replacement Hanoverian brother, also a duke. Most of these gentlemen held government appointments & kept one eye open for the main chance. George II was godfather to Lovat's son & a dukedom would probably have bought his loyalty, he was desperate to be a duke. His ally through thick & thin, against the Murray's was MacLeod of Macleod & Dunvegan his favoured bolt-hole when things got too hot. The duke of Argyll was also a good mate! He hated the Murray's as much as Simon.
 A fascinating character, he had his portrait painted by Hogarth at St Albans, en-route to his trial & he went to the block with a smile on his face when several of the packed-in spectators were killed when their seating collapsed!
 The enthusiastic Skye clansmen were under the impression that they were off to join the Jacobites when summoned by MacLeod & Macdonald of Sleat, the opposite proved the case when this duo finally made up their minds which way to jump. Their co-religionists the MacLeod's of Raasay joined the rebellion & paid the price, & retribution when it came, was exacted by the Skye MacLeod's who left slim pickings for the redcoats!
 This Thagt-shire business could be Cromarty-shire which was only joined to Ross-shire in modern times.

Skoosh.