Author Topic: Buried in Unconsecrated Ground  (Read 584 times)

Offline J Buxton

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Buried in Unconsecrated Ground
« on: Monday 29 April 19 23:38 BST (UK) »
Hi all,
Joseph Buxton’s death was registered in the second quarter of 1908 at West Ham (4A / 160)
In the register of burials at Walthamstow, Joseph Buxton who had died age 64 at Union Infirmary Leytonstone was buried on 9th June 1908,  grave ref IIID 334 in ordinary ground (rather than consecrated ground).  Another document also lists him as being buried in Unconsecrated Ground.
My query is that I had thought that only people who had committed suicide that were buried in unconsecrated ground  Was it cheaper? He had been an engine driver all his life so I wouldn't have thought he was destitute.  Was The Union Infirmary part of the workhouse?  Any opinions would be welcome

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Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Buried in Unconsecrated Ground
« Reply #1 on: Tuesday 30 April 19 01:00 BST (UK) »
Union is likely to have meant Poor Law Union. Workhouses had infirmaries.
There were various Burials Acts during 2nd half of 19th century. See 1880 Burials Act.

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Offline osprey

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Re: Buried in Unconsecrated Ground
« Reply #2 on: Tuesday 30 April 19 08:13 BST (UK) »
What was his denomination? I've found relatives buried in unconsecrated ground. They had been baptised in the established church but in later life attended a non-conformist church.
Cornwall: Allen, Bevan, Bosisto, Carnpezzack, Donithorn, Huddy, James, Retallack, Russell, Vincent, Yeoman
Cards: Thomas (Llanbadarn Fawr)
Glam: Bowler, Cram, Galloway, James, Thomas, Watkins
Lincs: Coupland, Cram
Mon: Cram, Gwyn, John, Philpot, Smart, Watkins
Pembs: Edwards (St. Dogmael's)
Yorks: Airey, Bowler, Elliott, Hare, Hewitt, Kellett, Kemp, Stephenson, Tebb

Offline KGarrad

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Re: Buried in Unconsecrated Ground
« Reply #3 on: Tuesday 30 April 19 08:16 BST (UK) »
Most workhouses had an attached Infirmary - it was the only medical care available to most people.

So I wouldn't read too much into that.
Garrad (Suffolk, Essex, Somerset), Crocker (Somerset), Vanstone (Devon, Jersey), Sims (Wiltshire), Bridger (Kent)

Offline Viktoria

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Re: Buried in Unconsecrated Ground
« Reply #4 on: Tuesday 30 April 19 08:29 BST (UK) »
Well the part of cemeteries for the burial of say Methodists ,Baptists.
was called The Non Conformist section—Non Con- that is not the same  as unconsecrated ground.
Church of England was called that, C of E.

I am not suggesting you have it wrong ,but as you say unconsecrated ground was where suicides were buried.
Is it possible I wonder , that it was at his request?
I have not heard of “ ordinary ground “ before.
Hope you get it sorted.
Viktoria.

Offline stanmapstone

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Re: Buried in Unconsecrated Ground
« Reply #5 on: Tuesday 30 April 19 08:55 BST (UK) »
My query is that I had thought that only people who had committed suicide that were buried in unconsecrated ground 

An 1823 statute legalized the burial of suicides in consecrated ground, but religious services were not permitted until 1882. . In 1882 this law was altered by the Interments (felo de se) Act, 1882, where every penalty was removed except that Interment could not be solemnized by a burial service .and the body may now be committed to the earth at any time, and with such rites or prayers as those in charge of the funeral think fit or may be able to procure.

Stan
Mapstone, Mapston.
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Offline stanmapstone

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Re: Buried in Unconsecrated Ground
« Reply #6 on: Tuesday 30 April 19 09:00 BST (UK) »
Consecration is the formal dedication and setting apart, by a Church of England Bishop, of a church, churchyard, or burial-ground.  There are legal consequences attaching to consecration, for instance a body cannot be removed from consecrated ground for burial elsewhere without a faculty.

Stan
Mapstone, Mapston.
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Offline Skoosh

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Re: Buried in Unconsecrated Ground
« Reply #7 on: Tuesday 30 April 19 09:01 BST (UK) »
 By the time you mention the bulk of the population were buried in public cemeteries so un-consecrated ground, whatever that means? Open to all & sundry, no mumbo-jumbo & nobody passing judgment on the dead for whatever reason! (Somebody else's job? ;D)

Skoosh.

Offline stanmapstone

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Re: Buried in Unconsecrated Ground
« Reply #8 on: Tuesday 30 April 19 09:05 BST (UK) »
The Burial Acts of 1852 and 1853,  allowed local authorities to build their own cemeteries
A municipal Cemetery would be usually divided into Anglican (i.e. Church of England),  and Non-Anglican burial areas. The Anglican burial area would be consecrated, and subject to Church law, a body interred in consecrated ground is under the protection of the ecclesiastical court. Unconsecrated ground would be for non-conformist denominations and civil burials. Roman Catholics, Jews and Quakers would have  their own sections.

Stan
Mapstone, Mapston.
Census Information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk