Author Topic: Buried in Unconsecrated Ground  (Read 585 times)

Offline Skoosh

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Re: Buried in Unconsecrated Ground
« Reply #9 on: Tuesday 30 April 19 09:19 BST (UK) »
None of that nonsense in Glasgow, the public cemeteries became a necessity after the Cholera epidemics of the mid 19th century & the scandal of mass-graves on private plots!  The new cemeteries were  completely un-segregated, the only qualification was to be dead. There were of course private cemeteries,  for RC's for example, & the Merchants had their own burial ground. There is a section of my local municipal cemetery set aside for the Jews but that land was purchased by that denomination & not public.

Skoosh.

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Offline J Buxton

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Re: Buried in Unconsecrated Ground
« Reply #10 on: Tuesday 30 April 19 09:36 BST (UK) »
On a closer reading it would appear that 11 other people were also buried in that plot over the the next 30 days, then another in 1956 and another in 1989.  I can only assume this was done to reduce costs.

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Offline Skoosh

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Re: Buried in Unconsecrated Ground
« Reply #11 on: Tuesday 30 April 19 09:44 BST (UK) »
Doesn't sound like a family plot, what did he die of?

Skoosh.

Offline Viktoria

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Re: Buried in Unconsecrated Ground
« Reply #12 on: Tuesday 30 April 19 10:33 BST (UK) »
Stan, I have misunderstood for most of my life!
I truly thought Non Con was Non Conformist ie Methodists&  Baptists.
I had no idea it meant not consecrated.
That seems a bit high handed by the C of E.
Thank you.
I will now have to go and get the grave papers for my Grandmother, died September1916 in “ Non Con “ part of Philip’s Park Cemetery.
The whole burial and grave cost something like £ 6 .OO.
It took grandad two years to pay it off at a few shillings a month.
That arrangement perhaps because my Mum & Dad( it was his mother) were “ courting” and Mum’s father was the Blacksmith for the Undertakers so perhaps a bit of leniency as to payment.
Dad was a prisoner of war and it was 1933 when they eventually married.
Otherwise I would now be about a hundred years old whereas I only feel that. ;D
Stan you are a mine of very useful information, Viktoria.

Offline stanmapstone

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Re: Buried in Unconsecrated Ground
« Reply #13 on: Tuesday 30 April 19 11:42 BST (UK) »
‘The distinction between consecrated and unconsecrated burial land remains fundamental to English and Welsh burial law’ http://www.rootschat.com/links/01nq7/

Stan
Mapstone, Mapston.
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Offline Guy Etchells

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Re: Buried in Unconsecrated Ground
« Reply #14 on: Tuesday 30 April 19 15:01 BST (UK) »
Cemeteries are divided into two sections.
Consecrated: This section is consecrated on opening and is mainly used for Church of England burials.
Unconsecrated: This section the individual plots may be consecrated shortly before each burial (if the particular faith requires) and is mainly used for faiths (and non-believers) other than Church of England burials.

A burial in the unconsecrated section does not mean the grave plot is unconsecrated ground
Cheers
Guy
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Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Buried in Unconsecrated Ground
« Reply #15 on: Wednesday 01 May 19 01:16 BST (UK) »
On a closer reading it would appear that 11 other people were also buried in that plot over the the next 30 days, then another in 1956 and another in 1989.  I can only assume this was done to reduce costs.
If he didn't have relatives on hand to arrange the burial, it may have been done by whoever was in charge at the infirmary, at public expense.
A list of 'Burials in unconsecrated ground' in Burnley Cemetery for a span of years in 19thC  were put on Lancashire Online Parish Clerks website some time ago. A lot of them were workhouse deaths and stillborn or young babies. There were several unrelated people in each grave. One memorable burial was 'The leg of N. N.'. I don't know where the rest of his mortal remains ended up; they weren't reunited in death. I looked for the list today but it seems to have been incorporated into the general run of registers.

Offline Guy Etchells

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Re: Buried in Unconsecrated Ground
« Reply #16 on: Wednesday 01 May 19 09:35 BST (UK) »
On a closer reading it would appear that 11 other people were also buried in that plot over the the next 30 days,

This shows that the plot was a public plot (what used to be often called a paupers plot). It was a grave paid for by the public authorities for those deceased who had no relatives who could pay for the deceased's burial.

then another in 1956 and another in 1989.  I can only assume this was done to reduce costs.
The later burials in the same plot were most likely due to the cemetery running out of land and having to re-use previously opened plots which were capable of containing more burials.
This is getting more and more common.
In many cases these days machines are used to dig the grave far deeper and the original remains re-buried in some cases as deep as 20 feet deep or more, leaving room above for new burials.

Cheers
Guy
http://anguline.co.uk/Framland/index.htm   The site that gives you facts not promises!
http://burial-inscriptions.co.uk Tombstones & Monumental Inscriptions.

As we have gained from the past, we owe the future a debt, which we pay by sharing today.