Author Topic: Anyone recognise the job of a Tillifer?  (Read 474 times)

Online arthurk

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Re: Anyone recognise the job of a Tillifer?
« Reply #9 on: Wednesday 01 May 19 10:54 BST (UK) »
Could it possibly be meant to be Filleter? (I haven't looked at the page image, but comparison of other letters might help to answer this.)

I haven't found this word in a dictionary, but one meaning of 'fillet', according to the OED, is 'a thin narrow strip of any material'; more specifically, in a Carding-engine, 'a strip of card-clothing'.

Joseph Wright's Dialect Dictionary includes 'filleting' as a West Yorkshire term for 'narrow strips of leather, india-rubber , or cloth, used for covering certain parts of a scribbling or carding machine'. One of his sources is a bit more precise: 'A piece of leather or cloth in which the pins of a carding-machine are fastened, and which is then fastened round a roller.'

Edited to add:
On the other hand, I like the look of Stan's tillotter too (OED has tillet or tillot, and tilloting, but not tilloter).

Another edit:
See my further thoughts at reply #12
Researching among others:
Bartle, Bilton, Campbell, Craven, Emmott, Harcourt, Hirst, Kellet(t), Kennedy,
Meaburn, Mennile/Meynell, Metcalf(e), Palliser, Robinson, Rutter, Shipley, Stow, Wilkinson

Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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Offline JenB

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Re: Anyone recognise the job of a Tillifer?
« Reply #10 on: Wednesday 01 May 19 11:02 BST (UK) »
I think Mike and Stan are right, the occupation, is tilloter (or tilliter as written Malcolm's snip).

Here's another 1881 example
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Offline Malcolm Bull

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Re: Anyone recognise the job of a Tillifer?
« Reply #11 on: Wednesday 01 May 19 11:09 BST (UK) »
Here's a larger section of the original 1881 census at Stainland for comparison

I agree that Stan's response - tilloter - is most likely.

MB
Surname interests:

Huntingdon: Bull / Shelford
Rotherham: Andrews / Steel
Easingwold: Snowball / Potter

Online arthurk

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Re: Anyone recognise the job of a Tillifer?
« Reply #12 on: Wednesday 01 May 19 11:24 BST (UK) »
In case anyone wants to check, the reference is RG11/4412 fo88 p17.

I tried looking for an upper-case 'F' in the same handwriting to see if my suggestion can be excluded. There aren't many to be seen, but p16 has a Cloth Fuller, and p19 has a Farmer and a Fireman (as well as another Tilliter). In all cases, the 'F' is clearly crossed, so I now think Filleter can be ruled out.
Researching among others:
Bartle, Bilton, Campbell, Craven, Emmott, Harcourt, Hirst, Kellet(t), Kennedy,
Meaburn, Mennile/Meynell, Metcalf(e), Palliser, Robinson, Rutter, Shipley, Stow, Wilkinson

Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline stitchwitch

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Re: Anyone recognise the job of a Tillifer?
« Reply #13 on: Wednesday 01 May 19 13:17 BST (UK) »
Yep, def Tilliter(sic).

The other thing that sadly strikes me is the 12yo already skilled as a worsted spinner.
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Offline stanmapstone

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Re: Anyone recognise the job of a Tillifer?
« Reply #14 on: Wednesday 01 May 19 14:04 BST (UK) »
From a Dictionary of obsolete and  provincial English
Mapstone, Mapston.
Census Information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline Dalum

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Re: Anyone recognise the job of a Tillifer?
« Reply #15 on: Thursday 02 May 19 00:25 BST (UK) »
...and the OED

tillet/tillot
" A kind of coarse cloth, used for wrapping up textile fabrics and (formerly) garments; also for making awnings."

apparently from Old French tellette - a wrapper of cloth
Sheffield look-ups, Cemeteries etc

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Offline Mike in Cumbria

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Re: Anyone recognise the job of a Tillifer?
« Reply #16 on: Thursday 02 May 19 08:36 BST (UK) »
...and the OED

tillet/tillot
" A kind of coarse cloth, used for wrapping up textile fabrics and (formerly) garments; also for making awnings."

apparently from Old French tellette - a wrapper of cloth

Interesting.

In that case, it presumably also derives from the French word "toile".

Toile is a fabric, from the French word meaning "linen cloth" or "canvas", particularly cloth or canvas for painting on. The word "toile" can refer to the fabric itself, a test garment (generally) sewn from the same material, or a type of repeated surface decoration (traditionally) printed on the same fabric. The term entered the English language around the 12th century.


And ultimately from the Latin Tela, meaning web.
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