Author Topic: Has anyone heard of the Stockiness Riot?  (Read 1666 times)

Offline marp

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Re: Has anyone heard of the Stockiness Riot?
« Reply #9 on: Wednesday 08 May 19 00:44 BST (UK) »
Hi,

I think it likely that the riot was either connected to the Pentrich Revolution of 1817 or a rising of framework knitters in 1811 (Jonathon Wright was a framework knitter).  Framework knitters made stockings and again, according the family stories, the stockingers walked to Nottingham from Pentrich to sell the stockings.

Thank you for the link.  I had seen it before when searching for the Hunt family.  In my family tree is Samuel Hunt who was tried at Derby assizes for high treason for his part in the Pentrich Revolution and transported to Australia.  In fact the beginning of the Pentrich Revolution was when the ringleaders met at Hunt's barn in South Wingfield.

Thank you again,  marp

However, as I was looking for the Hunt family I did not notice the Bramley/Brambley connections also.   So, thank you for that.


Offline spendlove

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Re: Has anyone heard of the Stockiness Riot?
« Reply #10 on: Wednesday 08 May 19 12:27 BST (UK) »
Hi

It is unlikely, but not impossible, for the Pentrich frame work knitters to walk to Nottingham to sell their stockings.  However the system was that Bag Men distributed the Cotton or Silk to the FWKs and then collected the finished hose and paid them for their work.

This system was used until the factory system came into operation, an example is the Ward family of Belper, long established as hosiers, who in 1801 built premises and installed stocking frames and employed FWKs they also rented out machines to FWK in various villages.  The cost of renting these frames plus low payment to these out workers,  caused a lot of hardship and led to the Pentrich uprising.

Frame work knitting frames were very expensive to purchase, the knitters also had to obtain the raw materials if they operated alone.  Think it more likely that many in Pentrich and other places in Derbyshire were renting their frames, some from the Ward family, who in 1801 became Ward Sharpe & co, abt 1811 Ward, Brettle & Ward a company who would later become George Brettle & co.

Please note this is a very rough statement as to the history of FWK.

Spendlove
Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Spendlove, Strutt in London & Middlesex.

Offline marp

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Re: Has anyone heard of the Stockiness Riot?
« Reply #11 on: Thursday 09 May 19 01:00 BST (UK) »
  Thank you for this Spendlove.  Regarding the walk to Nottingham from Pentrich to sell stockings,  I was repeating one of the many stories families pass down the generations.   Sometimes, they become embellished over time. The story of Stockiness is another example.

I had an aunt who told me the story of the man who hid in a grandfather clock to evade those knocking on his door to ask him to join them in what she said was the Pentrich Revolution.   Years later, I heard from a distant cousin, several times removed and found through a DNA match (with guess who), the same story but using the term the Stockiness Riot rather than Pentrich Rising/Revolution which led to my original posting here.

It is interesting to compare the factual accounts with the family stories which often have a grain of truth but the facts have been changed over the years of telling.

Thanks again, marp