Author Topic: Surnames in other languages  (Read 1035 times)

Offline pinefamily

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Re: Surnames in other languages
« Reply #18 on: Monday 20 May 19 00:31 BST (UK) »
As far as I am aware, Spanish and Portuguese tradition gives the mother's and grandmother's surnames as middle names for girls. I'm not sure how the boy's names are done.
I am Australian, from all the lands I come (my ancestors, at least!)

Pine/Pyne, Dowdeswell, Kempster, Sando/Sandoe/Sandow, Nancarrow, Carrington, Hounslow, Youatt, Richardson, Jarmyn, Oxlade, Coad, Bentham, Holloway, Lindner, Pittaway, and too many others to name.
Devon, Dorset, Gloucs, Cornwall, Yorks, Bucks, Oxfordshire, Wilts, Germany, Sweden, and of course London, to name a few.

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Online Erato

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Re: Surnames in other languages
« Reply #19 on: Monday 20 May 19 00:42 BST (UK) »
They aren't middle names; they are surnames.  Both Spanish and Portuguese use double-barreled surnames.  In Spanish, the paternal surname comes first and in Portuguese, it is the maternal surname that is first.

For example, in Spanish, the son of Juan López García and María Moreno Rodríguez will be Carlos López Moreno.
Wiltshire:  Banks, Taylor
Somerset:  Duddridge, Richards, Barnard, Pillinger
Gloucestershire:  Barnard, Marsh, Crossman
Bristol:  Banks, Duddridge, Barnard
Down:  Ennis, McGee
Wicklow:  Chapman, Pepper
Wigtownshire:  Logan, Conning
Wisconsin:  Ennis, Chapman, Logan, Ware
Maine:  Ware, Mitchell, Tarr

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Offline pinefamily

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Re: Surnames in other languages
« Reply #20 on: Monday 20 May 19 00:48 BST (UK) »
Thanks for explaining that Erato.
I am Australian, from all the lands I come (my ancestors, at least!)

Pine/Pyne, Dowdeswell, Kempster, Sando/Sandoe/Sandow, Nancarrow, Carrington, Hounslow, Youatt, Richardson, Jarmyn, Oxlade, Coad, Bentham, Holloway, Lindner, Pittaway, and too many others to name.
Devon, Dorset, Gloucs, Cornwall, Yorks, Bucks, Oxfordshire, Wilts, Germany, Sweden, and of course London, to name a few.

Online Erato

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Re: Surnames in other languages
« Reply #21 on: Monday 20 May 19 01:01 BST (UK) »
You can readily see how this is very useful for genealogical purposes.  On the other hand, it is a damned pain in the butt if you're a foreigner with only one surname because, no matter how many times you tell them that, they insist on inventing some second surname.  Usually your middle name winds up being taken as your paternal surname.  And that means you are listed under an entirely false name [which, admittedly, can sometimes be handy because it means that the surname in your passport does not match your name on the list of people who are behind on their taxes].
Wiltshire:  Banks, Taylor
Somerset:  Duddridge, Richards, Barnard, Pillinger
Gloucestershire:  Barnard, Marsh, Crossman
Bristol:  Banks, Duddridge, Barnard
Down:  Ennis, McGee
Wicklow:  Chapman, Pepper
Wigtownshire:  Logan, Conning
Wisconsin:  Ennis, Chapman, Logan, Ware
Maine:  Ware, Mitchell, Tarr

Offline Sloe Gin

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Re: Surnames in other languages
« Reply #22 on: Monday 20 May 19 13:15 BST (UK) »
What do they do about people like me who only have one forename?  :)
UK census content is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk  Transcriptions are my own.

Offline Skoosh

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Re: Surnames in other languages
« Reply #23 on: Monday 20 May 19 13:54 BST (UK) »
Very good Erato, crazy, but very good!  ;D

Skoosh.

Offline Billyblue

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Re: Surnames in other languages
« Reply #24 on: Tuesday 21 May 19 14:00 BST (UK) »
I was told once, by an Australian-born Vietnamese person, that Nguyen is the equivalent of Smith.

Dawn M
Denys (France); Rossier/Rousseau (Switzerland); Montgomery (Antrim, IRL & North Sydney NSW);  Finn (Co.Carlow, IRL & NSW); Wilson (Leicestershire & NSW); Blue (Sydney NSW); Fisher & Barrago & Harrington(all Tipperary, IRL)

Offline maggbill

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Re: Surnames in other languages
« Reply #25 on: Tuesday 21 May 19 14:11 BST (UK) »
And for me, who has done years of my Scottish/Irish ancestry, looking forward to future generations of my now Australian family - I wonder at the complexity of it all.

Immediate future possible generations - a mix of Scottish/Irish/German/English/Italian/Polish/Filippino… heavens running out of breath - and that is just without the inevitable modern issue of second marriages, split families, half siblings etc. etc....  !!!!!!
McNab, Kenney, Johnstone, Carrigan, (Cargan, Kirgan, Corrigan), Toll, Tracey, McNulty,  Reilly, Maguire, Loughlin, Banks, McGonagle, Forsyth, McDonald, Michael,  Kennedy, Bagnell, Cronan, Dunleavy, McMullan. -  Glasgow, Ireland, British Columbia Canada, Manchester New Hampshire USA.

Offline pinefamily

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Re: Surnames in other languages
« Reply #26 on: Tuesday 21 May 19 23:54 BST (UK) »
I was told once, by an Australian-born Vietnamese person, that Nguyen is the equivalent of Smith.

Dawn M

I have been told that too, Dawn.
Pronunciation is interesting. I've heard native speakers pronounce it two ways: Noiyen, and NeWIN.
I am Australian, from all the lands I come (my ancestors, at least!)

Pine/Pyne, Dowdeswell, Kempster, Sando/Sandoe/Sandow, Nancarrow, Carrington, Hounslow, Youatt, Richardson, Jarmyn, Oxlade, Coad, Bentham, Holloway, Lindner, Pittaway, and too many others to name.
Devon, Dorset, Gloucs, Cornwall, Yorks, Bucks, Oxfordshire, Wilts, Germany, Sweden, and of course London, to name a few.