Author Topic: Rag and bone man  (Read 60292 times)

Offline AnneMc

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Rag and bone man
« on: Tuesday 16 August 05 02:15 BST (UK) »
Does any one remember the rag and bone man???  I was out to lunch today with my friend from Scotland and a Canadian friend and I don't know how we came up with the topic of the rag and bone man but my Canadian friend had no idea what we were talking about.  Must say my Scottish friend and I had a good chat and I can remember that I took my grandmother's washing to the rag and bone man as my grandmother told me she had no old rags to give him. She had to chase him down the street to get her washing back!!!!

My Canadian friend asked what did they do with the rags?  We thought about it and we had no idea. Does anyone know??



Anne
Canada
Yorkshire - Thompson. Savage, Morris, Richardson, Frankish, Mintoft, Myers, Barker, Hotchkiss
Shropshire - Hotchkiss
Derbyshire - Hardwick, Barker, Marples
Lancashire - Winstanley, Morton

Offline tarnee

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Re: Rag and bone man
« Reply #1 on: Tuesday 16 August 05 02:28 BST (UK) »
Hi Anne,

Just read your post and it took me back many years. l remember as a kid the Rag and Bone men with their horse and cart. Thinking about it, l would say it was a form of recycling, today we have charities that have op shops, the rags which were no good to wear l think would go to factories for cleaning material. Also the coal was delivered by horse and cart.

Jean
Graham, Grundy, Wilson:- Birkenhead
Graham, Sharp, Hodgson, Sherwen:- Workington
Fulford,Braithwaite,Blanchard,Hackforth,Ward,White:- Lincolnshire
Seaby, Cockerill:- Northamptonshire.
Wiseman,Smith:- Warwickshire
Upton, Gentle:- Oxfordshire, Gloucestershire.
Wall, Curtis, Felts, Thoms:- Bedfordshire.
Davis, Smallman:- Shropshire.
Wilcox:- Worcestershire.
Young, Renwick:- Berwick upon Tweed.
Plante:- Stafford, Warwickshire.

Offline acorngen

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Re: Rag and bone man
« Reply #2 on: Tuesday 16 August 05 02:30 BST (UK) »
Anne,

I remember the rag and bone man to the point we used to hide old clothes etc and give them to him when he called for sixpence and a lolly ( early 1970's)  Shame they are no longer about.  

Now to answer your question.

Rags were and are still occasionally used to make paper.  When they are torn into tiny pieces they are left in a  liquid until the individual cotton threads have turned to mash ( as they do when recycling paper).  These were then dried out on frames.  The quality of the paper wasn't that good but it was a cheap.  This is one of the things I learnt when researching my 5 x Great grandfather who was a master paper maker in Derbyshire circa 1800 - 1814

Back to reminiscing.  I used to love watching the local R&B man sharpening scissors and knives.  Those sparks were like drugs to an addict to me.  I guess thats why I have a fascination with Pyro-techniks. It is a shame they are no longer around :(

Rob
WYATT, COX, STRATTON, all from south Derbyshire and the STS, LEI border Burns Fellows Gough Wilks from STS in particular Black Country and now heading into SOP


Offline AnneMc

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Re: Rag and bone man
« Reply #3 on: Tuesday 16 August 05 02:48 BST (UK) »
Hi Everyone:
Thanks for the replys. I did suggest that the rags were used to make paper but my two friends did not think so.  Another thing we talked about was bread and dripping !! I just love that have not had that in years.  I must say my canadian friend often wonders about my friend and I. I come from England and Phyllis from Scotland so when we get together you never know what we will come up with.  I must say my Canadian husband some times wonders about my food tastes!!  He can't understand me liking a chip butty.  But my two children like them.  I have passed on some of my tastes to them.  But then I can;t understand him liking peanut butter sandwhiches!! 


Anne
Yorkshire - Thompson. Savage, Morris, Richardson, Frankish, Mintoft, Myers, Barker, Hotchkiss
Shropshire - Hotchkiss
Derbyshire - Hardwick, Barker, Marples
Lancashire - Winstanley, Morton

Offline goggy

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Re: Rag and bone man
« Reply #4 on: Tuesday 16 August 05 04:01 BST (UK) »
AnneMc,youve done it now!STIRRED the old ragbag of a memory,jam jars,rags+bones,any that would re-cycle,Old Steptoe +Son was the best programme to explain all this wonderful world !!!
Our local dealer had a miniature carousel,or for those not so daring at 5 y.o,a Goldfish,bring your own bowl.Could go on ,never ending!!
When the younger ones want another' old fashioned' meal try the boiled tripe +onions,cow heel soup or ox tail with stale crusts and dripping!that should keep 'em happy.
         Loved it!!Goggy. ;D

Offline Janealogy

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Re: Rag and bone man
« Reply #5 on: Tuesday 16 August 05 06:28 BST (UK) »
Where I grew up used to have the Rag and Bone man on horse and cart. Lived on a very step hill, so the horse and cart would be left grazing while they went door to door. Many neighbors hoped for a deposit from the horse to put on their gardens. Also had the knife sharpener with his cart and stone. Scrap Iron, would also come around. Dad had a motor bike frame that this scrap iron guy wanted, thankfully even as a child I shoowed him off. Thanks goodness, my Dad was rebuilding an old BSA bike, I would have been blood and bone if I had let him take that. Gypsies used to come around selling the wooden dolly pegs, or tell your fortune if you crossed their palm with a piece of silver. We also had a fruit and veggie wagon come around once a week.

Bread and dripping I used to eat with my dad, in the kitchen with the door shut as my mum couldn't bare to watch us. Dad still eats hock, chickling (not to sure how its spelt) Tripe, onions with parsley sauce YUCK! stuffed heart YUCK! just writing that I can smell them being cooked.

I've given my children a few bad habits, bread and gravy after a nice roast dinner, dunking your biscuits in tea or coffee.

There are a lot of old traditions or way of life in the past that has changed, and future generations will never know it, shame!
Jane
Pembrokeshire St.Dogmaels names "Davies", "Jones" William (s)  and Rees, these families moved to Cardiff, Glamorgan.
Yorkshire, surname "Burniston"
Devon, Somerset and Cardiff Glamorgan surname "Wide"

Offline AnneMc

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Re: Rag and bone man
« Reply #6 on: Tuesday 16 August 05 07:22 BST (UK) »
Hi Jane:
I still have bread and gravy.  Another thing I liked was potty meat!! 


Anne
Yorkshire - Thompson. Savage, Morris, Richardson, Frankish, Mintoft, Myers, Barker, Hotchkiss
Shropshire - Hotchkiss
Derbyshire - Hardwick, Barker, Marples
Lancashire - Winstanley, Morton

Offline Janealogy

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Re: Rag and bone man
« Reply #7 on: Tuesday 16 August 05 07:38 BST (UK) »
Hi Anne,

What's potty meat? maybe I know it as something else.
I crave on occasions black pudding, I have never found a real good black pudding here in Auss, or smokey bacon crisps to have a nice crusty cob. Its amazing when you can't get certain things how bad you want them.
I knew someone years ago, who was just going crazy for a Marks & Spencer, cheesecake I think it was. Anyway paid a fortune to have one flown in, he sat down and said, thought it always tasted better than that!!!
Jane
Pembrokeshire St.Dogmaels names "Davies", "Jones" William (s)  and Rees, these families moved to Cardiff, Glamorgan.
Yorkshire, surname "Burniston"
Devon, Somerset and Cardiff Glamorgan surname "Wide"

Offline avj

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Re: Rag and bone man
« Reply #8 on: Tuesday 16 August 05 08:33 BST (UK) »
I remember Bread and Dripping and my mom's favourites roll mops (pickled herring) - the smell was awful.

My mother remembers milk being... delivered is quite the right word. It was brought round in churns on horse and cart and you took out your enamel jug and the milkman used a measured dipper to get the milk from the churn and pour it into your jug. This was then covered with wet Muslin to keep it fresh.

Everyone on the street grew their own produce, often including rhubarb and there was much competition for anything the horse left behind. My Grandfather had an intense rivalry with a neighbor, Billy, a very short little man. When the milkman cam round my Gran would keep watch and when she saw the horse 'doing its business' would shout for Grandad.."Bert!, Bert" the horse..."

Grandad would run for the door, grab the bucket and shovel that was kept handy and rush out to claim the prize. More often than not, however, he would be beaten to it by Billy and he'd stomp back into the house muttering "Damn Billy, he knows before the horse does when its going to do something..."   ;D



Just how do we archive these memories and pass them on to our kids.....


Adrian
Jordin, Cooper, Hobbs, Hardwick, Crotch, Carver, Taylor

Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk