Author Topic: Irish place name on 1871 census  (Read 428 times)

Offline Flemming

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Irish place name on 1871 census
« on: Monday 20 May 19 16:20 BST (UK) »
Do any Chatters know where the place in the attached clip might be? It's transcribed as 'Scay' but could it be Leay? Many thanks, Flemming.

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Offline myluck!

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Re: Irish place name on 1871 census
« Reply #1 on: Tuesday 21 May 19 13:51 BST (UK) »
If you were to think phonetically - there is a place named Lacky in Fermanagh

Also as it look more like Lcay to me - it could be an abbreviation
Kearney & Bourke/ Johns & Fox/ Mannion & Finan/ Donohoe & Curley
Byrne [Carthy], Keeffe/ Germaine, Butler/ McDermott, Giblin/ Lally, Dolan
Toole, Doran; Dowling, Grogan/ Reilly, Burke; Warren, Kidd [Lawless]/ Smith, Scally; Mangan, Rodgers/ Fahy, Calday; Staunton, Miller
Further generations:
Brophy Coleman Eathorn(e) Fahy Fitzpatrick Geraghty Haverty Keane Keogh Nowlan Rowe Walder

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Offline hallmark

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Re: Irish place name on 1871 census
« Reply #2 on: Tuesday 21 May 19 14:21 BST (UK) »
Depends on names, ages etc...then see if Birth Reg etc exist for them!!

Maybe even Parent's Marriage!
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Offline Rattus

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Re: Irish place name on 1871 census
« Reply #3 on: Tuesday 21 May 19 14:24 BST (UK) »
I found the relevant page on the census, to see the whole thing in context. I am inclined more towards 'Scay'.

Note the formation of the letters in 'Scotland' (just below) and 'Scholar' (down again, and left). Then look at the formation of the multiple instances of 'Laborer' [sic] elsewhere on the page. There is some ambiguity, but in general the word in question looks more like the former than the latter.

I assume that 'Newtonwards' is actually Newtownards, so I scanned the map in this area for a possible match. Nothing obvious.

With some (minimal) experience of Irish geography, language and spelling, I'm assuming it's the enumerator's attempt to render something like 'Skeagh'. Which might be this one, though there are several more:

http://www.placenamesni.org/resultdetails.php?entry=11494
BARTRAM - Nottingham, Derby, originally Beds (Stagsden)
PERFETT - St Pancras & Marylebone, Rugby, Nottingham
RADFORD - Nottinghamshire, also back & forth to Bury
RUDD - Durham, Margate, Bermondsey, Newcastle, Nottingham

Offline hallmark

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Re: Irish place name on 1871 census
« Reply #4 on: Tuesday 21 May 19 14:36 BST (UK) »
Give a man a record and you feed him for a day.
Teach a man to research, and you feed him for a lifetime.

Offline Flemming

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Re: Irish place name on 1871 census
« Reply #5 on: Tuesday 21 May 19 15:38 BST (UK) »
Many thanks to all for the replies. Skeagh looks like a strong contender. I had wondered if it was a phonetically spelled abbreviation for Scrabo which is near Newtownards, but that may be more like 'Scray' than 'Scay'.

Thanks again. Will dig further into the people concerned.

Flemming

Offline BallyaltikilliganG

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Re: Irish place name on 1871 census
« Reply #6 on: Friday 24 May 19 22:26 BST (UK) »
Hi Flemming,
my first reaction is your 1871 census if its Ireland is the first extract I have ever seen or cited from that census in this way. What have I missed and how to I get to see the original please., if its an English Census I have never seen an original entry for that year that lists this sort of detail etc ....
The census form appears to work down to Newtown Ards so the line above might be Lecale Lower the barony then upwards the next would be Co Down, then the next line upwards Ireland.As is actually written on the form 
If you have more than this extract, the original might confirm the idea.

I checked out Scrabo inhabitants in early 1860s in Griffiths Valuation
http://www.askaboutireland.ie/griffith-valuation/index.xml?action=doNameSearch&PlaceID=468293&county=Down&barony=Castlereagh,%20lower&parish=Newtown%20ards&townland=%3Cb%3EScrabo%3C/b%3E
there are no Flemming
however Ballyskeagh high and Ballyskeagh Lower townlands are on the northern border of Newtownards so Skeagh might be a pet name for home using the same griffiths source as above however no Flemming in either. 
My source for map etc is http://www.rosdavies.com/MAPS/NewtownardsTownlands.htm the same website has Flemming has about 10 entries in surnames under Newtownards . More than one are from North st and at least two weavers are among them   
So Lecale doesnt help anyway, except it keeps  your query firmly in co Down
Gracey Gracie Gracy Grassy Greacy
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Offline Flemming

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Re: Irish place name on 1871 census
« Reply #7 on: Friday 24 May 19 22:53 BST (UK) »
Hi there, thanks for the reply. The entry isn't for Flemming so doubt you'll find it under that name.

For the original, if you search for Patrick McClean age 39 in Workington, Cumberland, you should find it. There's a whole mix of Ireland, Scotland and Cumberland on the page.

Best wishes, Flemming.

Offline Rattus

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Re: Irish place name on 1871 census
« Reply #8 on: Saturday 25 May 19 08:13 BST (UK) »
For the avoidance of doubt, this relates to the England 1871 census.
BARTRAM - Nottingham, Derby, originally Beds (Stagsden)
PERFETT - St Pancras & Marylebone, Rugby, Nottingham
RADFORD - Nottinghamshire, also back & forth to Bury
RUDD - Durham, Margate, Bermondsey, Newcastle, Nottingham