Author Topic: Auntie who?  (Read 384 times)

Offline Teletran

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Auntie who?
« on: Thursday 30 May 19 18:42 BST (UK) »
Good afternoon,

I'm reviewing some old family photo's I have inherited and this name draws a blank with those I can ask, is that Auntie Foots?  Soots? Any idea's if this is short for another name for example?  Many thanks

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Online JenB

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Re: Auntie who?
« Reply #1 on: Thursday 30 May 19 18:44 BST (UK) »
I'd say it's Toots, although what that's short for I have no idea.
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Offline Mike in Cumbria

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Re: Auntie who?
« Reply #2 on: Thursday 30 May 19 18:46 BST (UK) »
Yes, Toots and quite likely a nickname rather a short version. Wasn't one of the Bash Street Kids called Toots?
Como le dijo el mosquito a la rana, "Mas vale morir en el vino que vivir en el agua"

Offline Teletran

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Re: Auntie who?
« Reply #3 on: Thursday 30 May 19 18:55 BST (UK) »
Thanks, Google 'therefore it must be correct' states it is more of a term of endearment. Seems it was popular in films in the 1930's.  Now that makes some sense the photo was taken in 1932 and the back is printed 'Movie films 'George Coleman' 10 Royal Arcade Boscombe.  I guess the joke has been lost in time and I can't identify the family member. Shame.

Offline Girl Guide

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Re: Auntie who?
« Reply #4 on: Saturday 01 June 19 12:15 BST (UK) »
Is this a postcard that has been addressed to someone?  If so to whom?

Does Boscombe have any significance to the family?

Tried looking in the 1939 register?
Ashford: Somerset, London
England: Devon, London, New Zealand
Holdway: Wiltshire
Hooper: Bristol, Somerset
Knowling: Devon, London
Southcott: Devon, China
Strong: Wiltshire
Watson: Cambridgeshire
White: Bristol
Windo - Gloucestershire, Somerset, Wiltshire

Offline loobylooayr

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Re: Auntie who?
« Reply #5 on: Saturday 01 June 19 12:42 BST (UK) »
I still refer to my teenage daughter as Toots from time to time , so I would definitely say it's a term of endearment.
Maybe Toots was how a child mispronounced "Auntie's" name. My sister called an uncle of ours Uncle  Coco . His proper name was Colin.

Looby :)


Offline genjen

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Re: Auntie who?
« Reply #6 on: Saturday 01 June 19 13:10 BST (UK) »
My father had aunties known as Tootie and Pansy - absolutely nothing to do with either of their given names, simply nicknames, the reasons for which were long ago lost!

My friend calls her granddaughter Toots - again, no reason, just affection.
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ESS: Howe French Cant Annis Noakes Turner Marshall Makerow Duck Spurden Harmony
SCT: Howe Shaw Raitt Milne Forsyth Birnie Crichton Duncan McBeath Daniel Hay Robertson Jaffrey Smith McDonald Alexander Craighead
NRY: Bushby Smith Bland Iley Cunion Kendrew Thornbury Favell Lonsdale Crossland Rudd Pratt Gibson
WES; Dickenson Jackson Ewbank Waller
STS: White
SRY: Knight
DUR: Smith Littlefair
HAM: Williams Grose Lush Venson

Online Greensleeves

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Re: Auntie who?
« Reply #7 on: Saturday 01 June 19 14:09 BST (UK) »
It seemed to have been quite popular in the 1920s/30s to give girls nicknames such as Toots, Bubbles, Pixie and suchlike.  I remember a great-aunt by marriage who visited occasionally,  and she was known as  Auntie Dolly.  I've never worked out which of the great-aunts she was because there are none in the family tree with a name remotely like that - Dorothy, for example, would have been an obvious choice, or Doreen but neither appear in the FT.
Suffolk: Pearl(e),  Garnham, Southgate, Blo(o)mfield,Grimwood/Grimwade,Josselyn/Gosling
Durham/Yorkshire: Sedgwick/Sidgwick, Shadforth
Ireland: Davis
Norway: Torreson/Torsen/Torrison
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Online CarolA3

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Re: Auntie who?
« Reply #8 on: Saturday 01 June 19 18:26 BST (UK) »
I associate Toots with 1930s/40s American movies, said with a short 'oo' as in 'foot' rather than 'boot'.

GS, my granddad's little sister was born in 1903 and registered/baptised as Harriet Sarah Eliza, and she was just Harriet in 1911 - but she didn't like those names and insisted on Dolly so the world assumed she must be Dorothy  In 1939 she was listed as Dorothy and presumably that was on her ID card etc.  Her death (1979) and probate (1980) were registered as Dorothy Harriet Sarah Eliza.

So, basically, at the end of the day - Dolly could be anyone ;D

Always happy to help :D
Carol
OXFORDSHIRE / BERKSHIRE
Bullock, Cooper, Boler/Bowler, Wright, Robinson, Lee, Prior, Trinder, Newman, Walklin, Louch