Author Topic: Help with a term for working in the fields 1608  (Read 388 times)

Offline Skoosh

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Re: Help with a term for working in the fields 1608
« Reply #9 on: Tuesday 04 June 19 09:25 BST (UK) »
Hilaire Belloc's book "The Aftermath or Gleanings from a Busy Life!" the poor were also permitted to "glean" the field after the corn was cut & gathered in!

Skoosh.

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Offline Mike in Cumbria

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Re: Help with a term for working in the fields 1608
« Reply #10 on: Tuesday 04 June 19 10:05 BST (UK) »
I don't know about other areas, but here in rural Cumbria "aftermath" has a slightly different meaning from gleanings and is still in common use.

After grass fields have had their first cut for silage, haylage or hay, the secondary growth is called the aftermath. This can either be grazed off or cut for a second time.




Added: A google search suggests that this is a widespread meaning, not just here in Cumbria.
Como le dijo el mosquito a la rana, "Mas vale morir en el vino que vivir en el agua"

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Offline Skoosh

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Re: Help with a term for working in the fields 1608
« Reply #11 on: Tuesday 04 June 19 12:04 BST (UK) »
Corect Mike, the aftermath could be grazed, mown or indeed ploughed under, gleaning, even in Cumbria, has been obsolete for quite some time.  Gleaning, a legal entitlement as per the Bible. Naomi & Ruth as I recall.

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Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Help with a term for working in the fields 1608
« Reply #12 on: Tuesday 04 June 19 18:08 BST (UK) »
Reply #5. "Colley Croft" and "Lampron"? Colley birds like the 4 in "Twelve Days of Christmas"?  I'm also curious as to what was kept in the "Nun yard"; perhaps a previous farmer had a herd of black and white cattle.  :)